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OPINION
September 19, 2012
Re "Grocer's plan to use E-Verify stirs anger," Sept. 17 Congratulations to the owner of Mi Pueblo Food Center for having the courage to stand up for what is right and deciding to participate in the federal E-Verify program. Many of the grocer's critics fail to consider an important benefit of E-Verify: to make sure that a person applying for a job using a Social Security number in fact obtained that number legally. My fiancee was the victim of identity theft when a person used her Social Security number for employment in another state.
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BUSINESS
October 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
A growing appetite for energy has caused China to overtake the U.S. as the world's biggest net importer of oil in September. On average, China used up 6.3 million more barrels a day than it produced last month, according to the Energy Information Admin. That points to imports equaling that amount to make up the shortfall. China's econonimic growth, rising income levels and growing car sales have stoked a hunger for more and more oil, the agency said. Meanwhile, the U.S., which still consumes far more oil per person than China, is enjoying booming domestic production thanks to new technology.
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OPINION
March 8, 2010
To think that for all these years, we were wrong about E-Verify, the government background check that tells employers whether their employees are authorized to work legally in the United States. We thought the reason to distrust the program was its tendency to get things wrong, ensnaring legal, permanent residents and citizens in red tape, halting their legitimate employment. Now it turns out that E-Verify is not misidentifying legitimate workers in troubling numbers but clearing undocumented immigrants.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Shan Li
Wealthy Californians have bounced back from the Great Recession, according to one report. About two-thirds of Californians with assets of $1 million or more actually feel better off now than before the 2008 financial crisis, a report from BMO Private Bank said. And roughly the same portion say they expect the economy to continue its recovery in the next year. "We are seeing increased confidence in the overall California economy, and the momentum is led by high-net worth individuals and families," said Ron Gong, managing director of CTC Consulting/Harris myCFO, a part of BMO Financial Group.
OPINION
October 7, 2011
Here we go again. Every year for the last five, immigration hawks in Congress have sought to require all businesses to use an error-plagued federal system known as E-Verify to ensure that all new hires are U.S. citizens or legal immigrants. This year's proposal, known as the Legal Workforce Act, deserves special attention because it's being disingenuously advertised as a jobs plan. Its author, Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), says that expanding E-Verify nationally will exorcise illegal immigrants from the workforce and create new opportunities for unemployed Americans.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
As Congress continues to discuss comprehensive immigration reform, one of the biggest issues businesses are watching is E-Verify, an online system that checks workers' immigration status. The House version of the bill would make E-Verify mandatory for businesses, as it already is in Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina. Since its inception in 1996, E-Verify has been criticized for being a burden to business - it provided inaccurate results and was too difficult to use for many small businesses focusing on day-to-day operations.
OPINION
June 13, 2011 | By Lamar Smith and Elton Gallegly
Over the last few years, our economy has faced unprecedented challenges, and millions of Americans have lost their jobs. For two years, the unemployment rate has hovered around 9%. While 26 million Americans are unemployed or underemployed, 7 million individuals work illegally in the United States. On top of all the challenges Americans face today, it is inexcusable that Americans and legal workers have to compete with illegal immigrants for scarce jobs. Fortunately, there is a tool available to preserve jobs for legal workers: E-Verify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
For years, activists against illegal immigration pushed cities across California to adopt ordinances ordering businesses to verify that their employees were eligible to work in the U.S. Several cities, including Temecula, Murrieta and Lake Elsinore, complied and required businesses to enroll in E-Verify, an online program that uses federal databases to check the immigration status of workers. Those that refused could face fines or revocation of their business licenses . But those victories appear to have been wiped out this month with legislation signed into law that prohibits the state, cities and counties from mandating that private employers use E-Verify.
OPINION
May 27, 2011
On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an Arizona law that permits local officials to revoke the licenses of businesses that knowingly hire illegal workers. The decision makes sense in principle but not in practice. Under the 2007 Legal Arizona Workers Act, business owners are required to use the federal E-Verify program to confirm if a person is authorized to work in this country. Employers must electronically check workers' names against databases kept by the Social Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - A Northern California-based supermarket chain that caters to Latino immigrant shoppers and was founded by an undocumented schoolteacher from Mexico announced Friday that the company is being audited by federal immigration officials. Disclosure of the audit, which could result in a mass firing, comes six weeks after San Jose-based Mi Pueblo Food Center joined E-Verify, a voluntary and controversial computerized system that screens the immigration status of new employees.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Shan Li
Tell The Times how you or your family is dealing with the government shutdown. The budget standoff in Washington has forced widespread cutbacks in services, closed national parks and sent thousands of federal workers on furlough. How are the ripple effects affecting your life? Full coverage: Obamacare rolls out Are you a furloughed government employee who has been told not to go to work? A small business owner who is seeing sales drop or cannot apply for a loan? Someone on holiday who has to reschedule your vacation?
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Don Lee and Ricardo Lopez
WASHINGTON - The effect of the partial government shutdown began hitting businesses Tuesday, with the potential for bigger problems if federal agencies remained closed more than a few days. A budget stalemate left many agencies with no money, forcing the furlough of about 800,000 federal workers nationwide, widespread cutbacks in services and closures of national parks and monuments. The effect resonated beyond the halls of Congress as companies grapple with the first federal shutdown in 17 years.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
As Congress continues to discuss comprehensive immigration reform, one of the biggest issues businesses are watching is E-Verify, an online system that checks workers' immigration status. The House version of the bill would make E-Verify mandatory for businesses, as it already is in Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina. Since its inception in 1996, E-Verify has been criticized for being a burden to business - it provided inaccurate results and was too difficult to use for many small businesses focusing on day-to-day operations.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - Aslam Khan, owner of 165 Church's Chicken eateries, still has the text message - a plea from a general manager at one of his restaurants in Indiana: “Please don't fire me. If I lose my job, I lose everything. Please let me stay in the company.” The request had moved Khan so much that he read it aloud to a round table of business executives meeting in Scottsdale this week to discuss their frustrations and concerns about immigration law - and their hope Congress passes some sort of reform to address those worries.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
More than half of small businesses are in favor of requiring all employers to comply with some kind of E-Verify system, even though a majority of them don't use it or have never heard of it, according to a national survey. The National Small Business Assn. interviewed nearly 300 businesses for its 2013 Workforce and Immigration Survey . It found that 17% employ immigrant workers and that 46% depend on workers with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - A Northern California-based supermarket chain that caters to Latino immigrant shoppers and was founded by an undocumented schoolteacher from Mexico announced Friday that the company is being audited by federal immigration officials. Disclosure of the audit, which could result in a mass firing, comes six weeks after San Jose-based Mi Pueblo Food Center joined E-Verify, a voluntary and controversial computerized system that screens the immigration status of new employees.
OPINION
June 18, 2011
Stanford's vets Re "Vets have desk duty — at Stanford," June 13 As a Stanford graduate and a U.S. Air Force Vietnam veteran, I was very pleased to read about several of the Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who now attend Stanford. Because only 10 out of roughly 7,000 undergraduates are military veterans, it is even more impressive that they have reached out to "traditional" students and are planning a conference on military energy use with the help of the president's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2009 | Anna Gorman and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Los Angeles County is exploring the possibility of requiring future contractors to participate in a federal program that checks whether employees are legal residents authorized to work in the United States. The Board of Supervisors voted 5 to 0 Tuesday to have county officials review E-Verify and make a recommendation on mandating the program for contractors, which could include drug treatment facilities, construction companies and foster family agencies. E-Verify is a free, online program that uses federal databases to verify that new hires are in the country legally and eligible to work.
OPINION
September 19, 2012
Re "Grocer's plan to use E-Verify stirs anger," Sept. 17 Congratulations to the owner of Mi Pueblo Food Center for having the courage to stand up for what is right and deciding to participate in the federal E-Verify program. Many of the grocer's critics fail to consider an important benefit of E-Verify: to make sure that a person applying for a job using a Social Security number in fact obtained that number legally. My fiancee was the victim of identity theft when a person used her Social Security number for employment in another state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2012 | By Lee Romney and Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - When customers enter Mi Pueblo Food Center to do their weekly shopping, the goal is to make them feel at home. Each of the grocery chain's 21 outlets, which are scattered throughout the Bay Area, Monterey Bay region and Central Valley, is styled to emulate a distinct Mexican region. Boisterous rancheras stream from the stores' speakers. Vivid primary colors and architectural references cover the walls: the adobe church of San Juan Nuevo, Michoacan, in San Jose's flagship store; the Maya pyramid of Chichen Itza in the Salinas market.
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