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Eadweard Muybridge

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Michael J. Ybarra, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pair of sepia photographs show a man sitting precariously on the edge of a rock, itself balanced none-too-reassuringly atop a cliff overlooking one of the great views in the world: Yosemite Valley. It's an image that speaks both to the grandeur of the West and the 19th century's desire to unlock the secrets of nature. The prints — meant to give a three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereograph device — were taken in 1872 by Eadweard Muybridge, a pioneering photographer whose work helped pave the way for motion pictures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By David Pagel
At a time when technology seems to be all about getting more people to see more images more quickly and clearly than ever before, Jennifer Pastor's “Endless Arena” comes across as a wonderfully nutty throwback to a bygone era. The spindly sculpture, in a small back gallery at Regen Projects, resembles nothing so much as the armature for some kind of homegrown experiment or the framework for an ad-hoc stage set. It's both and more. But you won't know that if you don't look closely.
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NEWS
October 9, 2003 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
For those with even a cursory knowledge of art history, the name Eadweard Muybridge rings familiar, primarily because his widely published 1872 motion studies of trotting horses begat the development of cinema. For well over a century, Muybridge remained a crucial but marginalized figure, an important footnote in photography's historical lineage.
OPINION
December 11, 2012
Re "Cinema's eye on 'Hobbit,'" Dec. 8 Converting to 48 frames per second overturns a long-standing industry standard of 24 frames per second, but that standard goes back further than the 80 years The Times cites. In 1878, Eadweard Muybridge captured the moving image of a running horse by making 12 sequential high-speed exposures in half a second. The work that Muybridge and his team did at Leland Stanford's horse farm was ground zero for the modern motion picture industry.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Nineteenth-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge, an English merchant's son who immigrated to the United States at age 21, is famous for three things: his own bizarre spelling of his name, his sensational acquittal for the murder of his wife's lover, and his blurry but indisputable photographic proof that Occident, former California Gov. Leland Stanford's racehorse, galloped by lifting all four feet off the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eadweard Muybridge? Wasn't he the 19th century photographer who made pioneering time-lapse studies of horses and people? Right. But you won't find any of those images at the Muybridge exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach. People are moving in some--you can tell by the blurs that replace their faces--but Muybridge surely didn't want them to.
BOOKS
June 15, 2003 | Michael Frank, Michael Frank is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Rebecca Solnit's "River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West" is a perfect example of a subject waiting -- in this case for almost a century and a half -- for the appropriate writer to come along to unlock its concealed meaning and unexpected relevance.
OPINION
December 11, 2012
Re "Cinema's eye on 'Hobbit,'" Dec. 8 Converting to 48 frames per second overturns a long-standing industry standard of 24 frames per second, but that standard goes back further than the 80 years The Times cites. In 1878, Eadweard Muybridge captured the moving image of a running horse by making 12 sequential high-speed exposures in half a second. The work that Muybridge and his team did at Leland Stanford's horse farm was ground zero for the modern motion picture industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By David Pagel
At a time when technology seems to be all about getting more people to see more images more quickly and clearly than ever before, Jennifer Pastor's “Endless Arena” comes across as a wonderfully nutty throwback to a bygone era. The spindly sculpture, in a small back gallery at Regen Projects, resembles nothing so much as the armature for some kind of homegrown experiment or the framework for an ad-hoc stage set. It's both and more. But you won't know that if you don't look closely.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Last summer, a battle erupted in Washington when the director of the National Museum of American Art sought to remove an early work by a prominent artist from a newly opening traveling exhibition. The 1964 work by Sol Lewitt, which incorporates photographs of a female nude, was claimed to be sexist and degrading to women. The matter was resolved when the National Museum backed down and opened the show with the Lewitt intact.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Eadweard J. Muybridge, pioneer of motion photography and Google Doodle recipient, was so unique that he couldn't stick with his given name, Edward.  And that was long before the days of Metta World Peace (Ron Artest) and Lady Gaga (Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta). The English photographer was an original whose stunning accomplishments were dimmed -- at least for a time -- by sordid, bloody happenings in his personal life. Muybridge, born 182 years ago today in England, changed his name from Edward James Muggeridge because he wanted to adopt the original Anglo-Saxon form of his name, according to Encyclopedia Brittanica.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Michael J. Ybarra, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pair of sepia photographs show a man sitting precariously on the edge of a rock, itself balanced none-too-reassuringly atop a cliff overlooking one of the great views in the world: Yosemite Valley. It's an image that speaks both to the grandeur of the West and the 19th century's desire to unlock the secrets of nature. The prints — meant to give a three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereograph device — were taken in 1872 by Eadweard Muybridge, a pioneering photographer whose work helped pave the way for motion pictures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Eadweard Muybridge's pioneering time-lapse photography laid the foundation for Hollywood movies -- and his colorful life could have been one. Muybridge, a 19th century British American, made his name documenting animals and humans in motion. He also killed his wife's lover and dodged the hangman, thanks to a couple of good lawyers. Despite his long tenure in California, he spent at most a few hours in Los Angeles -- as a stagecoach passenger.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
For those with even a cursory knowledge of art history, the name Eadweard Muybridge rings familiar, primarily because his widely published 1872 motion studies of trotting horses begat the development of cinema. For well over a century, Muybridge remained a crucial but marginalized figure, an important footnote in photography's historical lineage.
BOOKS
June 15, 2003 | Michael Frank, Michael Frank is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Rebecca Solnit's "River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West" is a perfect example of a subject waiting -- in this case for almost a century and a half -- for the appropriate writer to come along to unlock its concealed meaning and unexpected relevance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eadweard Muybridge? Wasn't he the 19th century photographer who made pioneering time-lapse studies of horses and people? Right. But you won't find any of those images at the Muybridge exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach. People are moving in some--you can tell by the blurs that replace their faces--but Muybridge surely didn't want them to.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Eadweard Muybridge's pioneering time-lapse photography laid the foundation for Hollywood movies -- and his colorful life could have been one. Muybridge, a 19th century British American, made his name documenting animals and humans in motion. He also killed his wife's lover and dodged the hangman, thanks to a couple of good lawyers. Despite his long tenure in California, he spent at most a few hours in Los Angeles -- as a stagecoach passenger.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Eadweard J. Muybridge, pioneer of motion photography and Google Doodle recipient, was so unique that he couldn't stick with his given name, Edward.  And that was long before the days of Metta World Peace (Ron Artest) and Lady Gaga (Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta). The English photographer was an original whose stunning accomplishments were dimmed -- at least for a time -- by sordid, bloody happenings in his personal life. Muybridge, born 182 years ago today in England, changed his name from Edward James Muggeridge because he wanted to adopt the original Anglo-Saxon form of his name, according to Encyclopedia Brittanica.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Nineteenth-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge, an English merchant's son who immigrated to the United States at age 21, is famous for three things: his own bizarre spelling of his name, his sensational acquittal for the murder of his wife's lover, and his blurry but indisputable photographic proof that Occident, former California Gov. Leland Stanford's racehorse, galloped by lifting all four feet off the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Last summer, a battle erupted in Washington when the director of the National Museum of American Art sought to remove an early work by a prominent artist from a newly opening traveling exhibition. The 1964 work by Sol Lewitt, which incorporates photographs of a female nude, was claimed to be sexist and degrading to women. The matter was resolved when the National Museum backed down and opened the show with the Lewitt intact.
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