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Eagle Mountain

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NEWS
July 27, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct the world's largest garbage dump--known as Eagle Mountain, and big enough to handle Southern California's trash for 115 years--were derailed Tuesday by a judge's ruling that the project's environmental impact review contains serious flaws.
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March 9, 2014
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2003 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
More than 130 inmates have been transferred out of a privately run state prison in eastern Riverside County after a weekend riot there left two convicts dead and tensions at the low-security lockup unusually high. State corrections officials said a melee Saturday night at the prison in Eagle Mountain involved about 150 inmates and raged for 90 minutes before a warning shot fired into the ground by an off-duty correctional officer quelled the fighting.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Barely a month ago, Christopher Pengra became mayor of a bedroom community outside Salt Lake City, anticipating the usual headaches of a fast-growing area, such humdrum fare as traffic congestion and zoning disputes. But there was nothing in his newcomer's manual to handle this: A Utah County sheriff's deputy was killed late last month, gunned down on a lonely rural highway in Eagle Mountain after stopping to assist a stranded motorist. Sgt. Cory Wride, 44, a father of five whom friends knew as a "shy cowboy," had served the town for two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
In a last-ditch effort to keep this remote company town from dying, Eagle Mountain operations manager Jan Roberts is calling on anyone who might be able to help: state lawmakers, federal land authorities, even Arnold Schwarzenegger, who worked here a decade ago during the filming of a "Terminator" movie. The California Department of Corrections plans to cease funding a privately operated prison nearby, the lifeblood of the town.
NEWS
April 15, 1986
The possibility of hiring a private firm to operate a new minimum-security prison on the site of the old Kaiser iron mine at Eagle Mountain is being considered by the state of California, according to Michael Badstubner of the Department of Corrections. He said the new facility--which would use some of the buildings at the abandoned Riverside County mine--would be leased, fenced and operated by the Management & Training Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
Plans for the nation's biggest landfill have been delayed -- if not derailed - by a court ruling 20 years after the dump was proposed less than two miles from Joshua Tree National Park. A federal appeals court panel has ruled that a land swap at the heart of the much-litigated Eagle Mountain plan was flawed because of an inaccurate appraisal by the Bureau of Land Management. The decision, issued Tuesday, upheld some portions of a lower court ruling but reversed others. An official with Kaiser Ventures, Eagle Mountain's developer, said the firm may appeal.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Troubled Kaiser Steel plans to study the possibility of turning its abandoned Eagle Mountain iron ore mine in Riverside County into a regional non-hazardous solid waste dump, The Times has learned. The Colorado Springs, Colo.-based company, which used to maintain its headquarters in Fontana, intends to formally announce Monday that it will undertake a feasibility study with another company, a Kaiser Steel spokeswoman confirmed Friday. She declined to name the other company involved.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | PETER H. KING
California has provided the environmental movement with many famous battlegrounds. Diablo Canyon, Stringfellow, Mono Lake, the Stanislaus--these places became shorthand for struggles over nuclear power, toxic waste, water. I suspect Eagle Mountain will join the list. Eagle Mountain is short for the Eagle Mountain Landfill and Recycling Center, a mega-dump proposed for an old iron mine near here.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Barely a month ago, Christopher Pengra became mayor of a bedroom community outside Salt Lake City, anticipating the usual headaches of a fast-growing area, such humdrum fare as traffic congestion and zoning disputes. But there was nothing in his newcomer's manual to handle this: A Utah County sheriff's deputy was killed late last month, gunned down on a lonely rural highway in Eagle Mountain after stopping to assist a stranded motorist. Sgt. Cory Wride, 44, a father of five whom friends knew as a "shy cowboy," had served the town for two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
Plans for the nation's biggest landfill have been delayed -- if not derailed - by a court ruling 20 years after the dump was proposed less than two miles from Joshua Tree National Park. A federal appeals court panel has ruled that a land swap at the heart of the much-litigated Eagle Mountain plan was flawed because of an inaccurate appraisal by the Bureau of Land Management. The decision, issued Tuesday, upheld some portions of a lower court ruling but reversed others. An official with Kaiser Ventures, Eagle Mountain's developer, said the firm may appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2004 | Louis Sahagun and Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writers
Capping a four-month law enforcement probe into a deadly riot at a privately run prison, eight inmates were charged with murder Wednesday in connection with the October melee that left two convicts dead at the Eagle Mountain state prison south of Palm Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2003 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
When the experiment began in the 1980s, it promised to reshape the way America housed its prisoners. The concept was simple: Shift some inmates into the hands of private industry. Critics argued that the sensitive job of imprisonment should not be shared with for-profit companies. But advocates promised lower costs, and states -- faced with swelling inmate populations -- needed beds, fast. Texas, Florida and the federal government signed on with gusto. In California, however, the growth of private lockups has been stifled by resistance from the powerful prison guards union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2003 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
More than 130 inmates have been transferred out of a privately run state prison in eastern Riverside County after a weekend riot there left two convicts dead and tensions at the low-security lockup unusually high. State corrections officials said a melee Saturday night at the prison in Eagle Mountain involved about 150 inmates and raged for 90 minutes before a warning shot fired into the ground by an off-duty correctional officer quelled the fighting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
In a last-ditch effort to keep this remote company town from dying, Eagle Mountain operations manager Jan Roberts is calling on anyone who might be able to help: state lawmakers, federal land authorities, even Arnold Schwarzenegger, who worked here a decade ago during the filming of a "Terminator" movie. The California Department of Corrections plans to cease funding a privately operated prison nearby, the lifeblood of the town.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct the world's largest garbage dump--known as Eagle Mountain, and big enough to handle Southern California's trash for 115 years--were derailed Tuesday by a judge's ruling that the project's environmental impact review contains serious flaws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1992
In response to "Riverside County Sued Over Plans for Huge Landfill," Dec. 4: No one out here is happy with the prospect of metropolitan trash riding our rails instead of us. The Riverside County Planning Commission had the good sense to reject this stupid idea. We were shocked when some, not all, uninformed supervisors approved the Eagle Mountain trash-by-train project. We wonder how this all will affect commuter rail. No one in his right mind could approve trash, hazardous waste or nuclear waste burial in our desert with what we now feel daily--another 5.2 earthquake recently--and expect in the future regarding earthquake displacement resulting in ground-water contamination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2003 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
When the experiment began in the 1980s, it promised to reshape the way America housed its prisoners. The concept was simple: Shift some inmates into the hands of private industry. Critics argued that the sensitive job of imprisonment should not be shared with for-profit companies. But advocates promised lower costs, and states -- faced with swelling inmate populations -- needed beds, fast. Texas, Florida and the federal government signed on with gusto. In California, however, the growth of private lockups has been stifled by resistance from the powerful prison guards union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1992
In response to "Riverside County Sued Over Plans for Huge Landfill," Dec. 4: No one out here is happy with the prospect of metropolitan trash riding our rails instead of us. The Riverside County Planning Commission had the good sense to reject this stupid idea. We were shocked when some, not all, uninformed supervisors approved the Eagle Mountain trash-by-train project. We wonder how this all will affect commuter rail. No one in his right mind could approve trash, hazardous waste or nuclear waste burial in our desert with what we now feel daily--another 5.2 earthquake recently--and expect in the future regarding earthquake displacement resulting in ground-water contamination.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | PETER H. KING
California has provided the environmental movement with many famous battlegrounds. Diablo Canyon, Stringfellow, Mono Lake, the Stanislaus--these places became shorthand for struggles over nuclear power, toxic waste, water. I suspect Eagle Mountain will join the list. Eagle Mountain is short for the Eagle Mountain Landfill and Recycling Center, a mega-dump proposed for an old iron mine near here.
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