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Eames Demetrios

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | Vicki Jo Radovsky
"Filmmaker-artist-design steward" is how Eames Demetrios -- the grandson of Modernist design icons Charles and Ray Eames -- describes his occupation. The San Francisco-born multi-hyphenate, 46, also serves as director of Santa Monica's Eames Office, which preserves the legacy of his grandparents. With such a varied resume, it's no wonder Demetrios -- who lives in Mar Vista with wife Shelley and son Guthrie, 16 -- enjoys such an eclectic weekend. He says it's most fun when his son Xander, 19, is home from college.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By David Colker
Lucia Eames was a designer in her own right, but for the last 25 years she worked to preserve the legacy of one of the most celebrated design teams of the modern era: her father, Charles Eames, and stepmother, Ray Eames. In particular, Lucia Eames ensured that their famed Pacific Palisades house - considered one of the pinnacles of modern residential design - remained as a monument not only to the couple's sense of architecture and design, but also to the way they approached their work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By David Colker
Lucia Eames was a designer in her own right, but for the last 25 years she worked to preserve the legacy of one of the most celebrated design teams of the modern era: her father, Charles Eames, and stepmother, Ray Eames. In particular, Lucia Eames ensured that their famed Pacific Palisades house - considered one of the pinnacles of modern residential design - remained as a monument not only to the couple's sense of architecture and design, but also to the way they approached their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's kind of amazing when you think about it, all the things Charles and Ray Eames did. Known for work as diverse as the Eames chair and the short film “Powers of Ten,” they were architects, artists and designers of everything from graphics to toys to textiles, operating out of the Eames Office in Venice, as well as the Case Study house they built in Pacific Palisades in 1949. Their creations are marked by a unique mix of utility and play; “Take your pleasure seriously,” Charles observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternately arty and preachy, Eames Demetrios' "The Giving" (at the Sunset 5) is an ambitious, increasingly surreal odyssey of a successful young computer whiz (Kevin Kildow) who becomes obsessed with sacrificing himself for the good of Los Angeles' homeless. Visually, the film is superb, thanks to Antonio Soriano's breathtakingly beautiful black-and-white cinematography, and there's an equally fine, moody score by Stephen James Taylor.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ
No great work of modern furniture design is without a conceptual superstructure. As director of the Eames Office Gallery and Store, and grandson of Charles and Ray, Eames Demetrios can offer an explication of that particularly Eamesian precept called "the honest use of materials." "This chair is not embarrassed about being made out of wood," Demetrios says, stopping at the classic molded plywood lounge chair known in some circles as the "potato chip," and in Eames nomenclature as LCW.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
The irony of a paper that prints each morning its lineage of publishers (with the name Chandler appearing with considerable frequency) publishing a report revealing that people hire their relatives is too delicious. The wonderful photograph elsewhere in the issue of Melvin Van Peebles in his son Mario's film eloquently gave the lie to the undiluted scorn of your article. For what it's worth, I think the article misses the point: It is money, not blood, that makes the media massage mediocre films--how else to explain the puff pieces in your paper about "Home Alone 2" and the rest?
HOME & GARDEN
June 19, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
Charles and Ray Eames became the first furniture designers ever to be honored by the U.S. Postal Service. On Tuesday, nearly 300 design fans and stamp collectors attended a ceremony at the Eames Office in Santa Monica, grandson Eames Demetrios says. The commemorative edition of 24 million stamps, on sale for one year, is available in collectible 16-image sheets, as shown here. "It's not just the familiar furniture," Demetrios says.
HOME & GARDEN
May 3, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
FOR Eames Demetrios, preserving the work of his grandparents, 20th century designers and filmmakers Charles and Ray Eames, is more than a family business. Demetrios, shown here, has relocated Eames Office to a former thrift shop in Santa Monica in time for the centennial of Charles Eames' birth. The new 5,000-square-foot location combines educational exhibits with showroom models of Eames' postwar Modern classics, including the bent plywood DCW chair and leather 670 lounge chair.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's kind of amazing when you think about it, all the things Charles and Ray Eames did. Known for work as diverse as the Eames chair and the short film “Powers of Ten,” they were architects, artists and designers of everything from graphics to toys to textiles, operating out of the Eames Office in Venice, as well as the Case Study house they built in Pacific Palisades in 1949. Their creations are marked by a unique mix of utility and play; “Take your pleasure seriously,” Charles observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
On a perfectly clear afternoon last week, Eames Demetrios, grandson of the pioneering, multitalented designers Charles and Ray Eames, met me at the house and studio in Pacific Palisades that his grandparents built for themselves in the late 1940s. The living room of the boxy, steel-framed house was empty, its contents having been carefully packed up and carted 10 miles east to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. As part of LACMA's "Living in a Modern Way: California Design 1930-1965," a major show in the Pacific Standard Time series , the items, more than 1,800 in all, have been painstakingly reassembled inside a full-sized replica of the house.
HOME & GARDEN
June 19, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
Charles and Ray Eames became the first furniture designers ever to be honored by the U.S. Postal Service. On Tuesday, nearly 300 design fans and stamp collectors attended a ceremony at the Eames Office in Santa Monica, grandson Eames Demetrios says. The commemorative edition of 24 million stamps, on sale for one year, is available in collectible 16-image sheets, as shown here. "It's not just the familiar furniture," Demetrios says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | Vicki Jo Radovsky
"Filmmaker-artist-design steward" is how Eames Demetrios -- the grandson of Modernist design icons Charles and Ray Eames -- describes his occupation. The San Francisco-born multi-hyphenate, 46, also serves as director of Santa Monica's Eames Office, which preserves the legacy of his grandparents. With such a varied resume, it's no wonder Demetrios -- who lives in Mar Vista with wife Shelley and son Guthrie, 16 -- enjoys such an eclectic weekend. He says it's most fun when his son Xander, 19, is home from college.
HOME & GARDEN
May 3, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
FOR Eames Demetrios, preserving the work of his grandparents, 20th century designers and filmmakers Charles and Ray Eames, is more than a family business. Demetrios, shown here, has relocated Eames Office to a former thrift shop in Santa Monica in time for the centennial of Charles Eames' birth. The new 5,000-square-foot location combines educational exhibits with showroom models of Eames' postwar Modern classics, including the bent plywood DCW chair and leather 670 lounge chair.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
THEIR GOAL WAS TO BUILD A BETTER SOCIETY, and that they did--countless homes and commercial spaces today are furnished with the sleek, vibrant designs of Charles and Ray Eames, the husband and wife who operated out of a former garage in Venice in the mid-20th century.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 1999 | ED LEIBOWITZ
No great work of modern furniture design is without a conceptual superstructure. As director of the Eames Office Gallery and Store, and grandson of Charles and Ray, Eames Demetrios can offer an explication of that particularly Eamesian precept called "the honest use of materials." "This chair is not embarrassed about being made out of wood," Demetrios says, stopping at the classic molded plywood lounge chair known in some circles as the "potato chip," and in Eames nomenclature as LCW.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
THEIR GOAL WAS TO BUILD A BETTER SOCIETY, and that they did--countless homes and commercial spaces today are furnished with the sleek, vibrant designs of Charles and Ray Eames, the husband and wife who operated out of a former garage in Venice in the mid-20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
On a perfectly clear afternoon last week, Eames Demetrios, grandson of the pioneering, multitalented designers Charles and Ray Eames, met me at the house and studio in Pacific Palisades that his grandparents built for themselves in the late 1940s. The living room of the boxy, steel-framed house was empty, its contents having been carefully packed up and carted 10 miles east to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. As part of LACMA's "Living in a Modern Way: California Design 1930-1965," a major show in the Pacific Standard Time series , the items, more than 1,800 in all, have been painstakingly reassembled inside a full-sized replica of the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
The irony of a paper that prints each morning its lineage of publishers (with the name Chandler appearing with considerable frequency) publishing a report revealing that people hire their relatives is too delicious. The wonderful photograph elsewhere in the issue of Melvin Van Peebles in his son Mario's film eloquently gave the lie to the undiluted scorn of your article. For what it's worth, I think the article misses the point: It is money, not blood, that makes the media massage mediocre films--how else to explain the puff pieces in your paper about "Home Alone 2" and the rest?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternately arty and preachy, Eames Demetrios' "The Giving" (at the Sunset 5) is an ambitious, increasingly surreal odyssey of a successful young computer whiz (Kevin Kildow) who becomes obsessed with sacrificing himself for the good of Los Angeles' homeless. Visually, the film is superb, thanks to Antonio Soriano's breathtakingly beautiful black-and-white cinematography, and there's an equally fine, moody score by Stephen James Taylor.
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