Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEamon Collins
IN THE NEWS

Eamon Collins

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one seemed surprised at the discovery of a body on Doran's Hill Road, stabbed and beaten beyond recognition. The Roman Catholic residents of Bancroft Park housing project didn't need police to tell them whose it was, either. The slaying of 45-year-old Eamon Collins, an Irish Republican Army defector, was a death foretold.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one seemed surprised at the discovery of a body on Doran's Hill Road, stabbed and beaten beyond recognition. The Roman Catholic residents of Bancroft Park housing project didn't need police to tell them whose it was, either. The slaying of 45-year-old Eamon Collins, an Irish Republican Army defector, was a death foretold.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | Associated Press
The author of an unflinching expose of life inside the Irish Republican Army was found dead by a roadside Wednesday, the victim of a savage beating. The body of Eamon Collins was found at dawn near the town of Newry, 40 miles south of Belfast, his face battered beyond recognition. Police forensics experts said he had been stabbed repeatedly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
A dark comic edge infiltrates "The Blowin of Baile Gall" at the Lyric Theatre, and it trumps some oddities of form. This second entry in Irish playwright Ronan Noone's trilogy about modern-day Connemara has obvious pertinence in its sardonic study of xenophobia and territorialism. The titular "blowin" refers to persons not born and raised in Baile Gall, which rankles Eamon Collins Jr. (Tim Hamelen).
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many things have changed in Northern Ireland since Protestants and Catholics signed the Good Friday peace agreement nearly a year ago, but from this outpost of sympathy for the Irish Republican Army to a new parliament's marble halls in Belfast, one key element remains the same: deep distrust.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|