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Ear Plugs

NEWS
January 12, 1995 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pete Wilson, the Second Term, was supposed to be different. No more fires. No more drought. No more riots. No more earthquakes. But Wilson had to wonder Wednesday as he took the first trip of his second term: Not this again. Once more, the governor found himself boarding another National Guard helicopter for another aerial tour of another disaster scene. "My reaction is, 'Come on, give us a break. How much are we expected to endure?'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1986 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
Alcohol consumption at city beach and bay parking lots will be prohibited under an emergency ordinance that is expected to be adopted today by the San Diego City Council. The ordinance, which was introduced by Councilman Mike Gotch and is supported by the Police Department, is intended to curb increasing citizen complaints of drinking and rowdy behavior by youngsters at five parking lots in and around Mission Bay Park and other city beachfront communities.
SPORTS
January 1, 2003 | MIKE TERRY
Kim Mulkey-Robertson, in her third season coaching at Baylor, hears all the snide remarks. Of how the Bears play a creampuff nonconference schedule. Or that getting bounced in the second round of last year's NCAA tournament proved that they didn't deserve the No. 7 ranking -- despite the fact Baylor won 26 games and finished second in the Big 12 Conference behind Oklahoma. And that Baylor will never finish strong in March because the Bears aren't toughened in November and December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1986 | ARLENE CARSTEN, Arlene Carsten is mayor of Del Mar
Residents of Del Mar and Solana Beach have recently been offered a deal they can't refuse: cut-rate ear plugs, free "relocation" out of their homes for two weekends and a resident biologist to sit in the lagoon to monitor the effects of noise on the creatures that inhabit that sanctuary. Some may ask how did this happen? How could this happen? How could two small residential communities suddenly find their tranquility, their quality of life, shattered?
SPORTS
August 26, 1999 | SHAV GLICK
Wade Boggs reached 3,000 hits, but that achievement didn't change Kirk Gibson's feelings about the Tampa Bay Devil Ray third baseman. "When he kissed home plate, I rolled my eyes," said Gibson, the former Dodger hero who is now a Detroit Tiger broadcaster. "That was vintage Wade. That's the reason he doesn't get respect. He's me-me, I-I. I don't take away his 3,000 hits, that's a great achievement. But it takes 25 guys to win a championship."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
If the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals expanded its concerns to include humans, there would have been pickets all around the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Friday night. The volume was so painfully high during the three-hour heavy-metal concert that any thinking person in the first 40 rows should have been wearing ear plugs. But, of course, no one did. Part of the lure of the heavy-metal ritual is the sense of reckless abandon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1993 | JEFF CARMONA
While most Southern Californians spend New Year's Day watching the Rose Parade or college football games on TV, a few hundred avid beach-goers will celebrate the holiday by plunging into the chilly Pacific Ocean. The Cabrillo Beach Polar Bears, a group of more than 100 ocean swimmers, will sponsor its 42nd annual New Year's Day Swim in the waters off San Pedro. About 350 people are expected to strip down to their bathing suits and take the plunge Saturday, said club President Ray Falk, 71.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2002 | Steve Harvey
It makes sense when you think about it. Lauren Schwartz of Moorpark points out that a concert by Jack Mack & the Heart Attack was sponsored by Encino Tarzana Regional Medical Center. I forgot to ask if the audience received wrist tags at the gate. Which reminds me: Evelyn Hill of Malibu noticed that the restaurant in the Santa Monica Medical Plaza parking structure is named the Cutting Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1998 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A teenager who used ear plugs before fatally shooting his mother--something he told investigators he should have done years earlier--was convicted of second-degree murder Wednesday. Jurors took the middle ground in the verdict against Joseph Davidson. Prosecutors had sought first-degree murder because Davidson deliberately killed his adoptive mother, while the defense asked for manslaughter, arguing Davidson was abused by her and mentally deficient.
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