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Earl Boykins

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February 15, 2010 | By Alejandro Danois
At home in North Carolina, Los Angeles D-Fenders Coach Chucky Brown began receiving phone calls before training camp in November about a diminutive blur of a player in L.A. named Horace Wormely. The 5-foot-6 point guard turned in dominating performances against some NBA and overseas pros in the Drew Summer League, where Wormely was picked as the "most inspirational player." One call came from former UCLA star and 12-year NBA veteran Tracy Murray, who was effusive about the small point guard.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2010 | By Alejandro Danois
At home in North Carolina, Los Angeles D-Fenders Coach Chucky Brown began receiving phone calls before training camp in November about a diminutive blur of a player in L.A. named Horace Wormely. The 5-foot-6 point guard turned in dominating performances against some NBA and overseas pros in the Drew Summer League, where Wormely was picked as the "most inspirational player." One call came from former UCLA star and 12-year NBA veteran Tracy Murray, who was effusive about the small point guard.
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SPORTS
January 13, 2003
"Even when I looked down, I couldn't see him. He almost stole the ball from me. At the time, I thought it was someone from the audience." Yao Ming, Houston Rocket center, on the Golden State Warrior 5-foot-5 Earl Boykins.
SPORTS
April 22, 2006 | J.A. Adande
The problem with not making a playoff appearance since the year Biggie Smalls got shot is you can't develop rivalries. When you see the same team repeatedly with the season on the line, the animosity ramps up. That's what leads to Shaquille O'Neal calling the Sacramento Kings the "Queens," or Tim Hardaway describing his feelings for the New York Knicks: "I hate them with all the hate you can hate with." Mmmmmm-mmm, that's some good hatin'.
SPORTS
November 20, 2001 | Bill Plaschke
Sitting in the stands at a recent Clipper game, staring intently at my nachos, I was startled by the shout of my young son. "Look!" he cried. "They're letting one of the ball boys play!" I looked. And, well, yes, dribbling downcourt in an oversized Clipper uniform was a little guy seemingly plucked from behind a baseline dust mop. The smallest professional athlete I've ever seen who was not astride a horse.
SPORTS
January 22, 2001 | LARRY STEWART
When you're in the midst of a five-game losing streak, you look for little things to brighten the outlook. For the Clippers, that would be 5-foot-5 Earl Boykins. Boykins, however, is contributing more than just a little. The night he was activated from the injured list, Jan. 7, he made a big splash against the Lakers, dazzling a Staples Center crowd with his speed and quickness. He had 11 points, three assists and one offensive rebound in the Clippers' 118-95 victory.
SPORTS
January 9, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE
Point guard Earl Boykins might only be 5 feet 5, but don't be mistaken by his height. The Clippers have known that since training camp and are happy to see him finally get his chance to play. With rookie Keyon Dooling on the injured list until next week, Boykins made his Clipper debut as Jeff McInnis' backup against the Lakers on Sunday and Coach Alvin Gentry said the team is looking for ways to keep him on the active list.
SPORTS
January 15, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE
At some point in tonight's game against Indiana, Clipper Coach Alvin Gentry will insert Earl Boykins into the lineup and somewhere in the Conseco Fieldhouse crowd, someone will joke about his 5-foot-5 height. Boykins, who played in 25 games with Cleveland last season, is having fun showing people his skills, however. With more offensive game than the league's previous players shorter than 5-8, such as Spud Webb and Muggsy Bogues, Boykins is a defensive nightmare for opposing point guards.
SPORTS
January 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Earl Boykins broke the NBA record for points in an overtime, scoring 15 of Denver's 21 points in the extra period as the Nuggets, without two key players, beat the SuperSonics, 116-110, Tuesday night at Seattle. Boykins, the league's smallest player at 5 feet 5, broke the record of 14 overtime points set by Butch Carter of Indiana against Boston on March 20, 1984. The Nuggets ended a two-game losing streak and ended Seattle's four-game home winning streak.
SPORTS
January 30, 2003 | Mal Florence
Steve Kelley of the Seattle Times commenting on Earl Boykins, the Golden State Warriors' 5-foot-5 backup point guard: "Not only is Boykins short. He is slight. One of Shaquille O'Neal's legs weighs more than Boykins. "Athletes his size are supposed to ride the favorite in the feature race at Santa Anita, not drive a basketball into the defense of angry shot-blockers. They should be fighting for the lightweight title or lining up corner kicks, or playing second base."
SPORTS
January 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Earl Boykins broke the NBA record for points in an overtime, scoring 15 of Denver's 21 points in the extra period as the Nuggets, without two key players, beat the SuperSonics, 116-110, Tuesday night at Seattle. Boykins, the league's smallest player at 5 feet 5, broke the record of 14 overtime points set by Butch Carter of Indiana against Boston on March 20, 1984. The Nuggets ended a two-game losing streak and ended Seattle's four-game home winning streak.
SPORTS
January 30, 2003 | Mal Florence
Steve Kelley of the Seattle Times commenting on Earl Boykins, the Golden State Warriors' 5-foot-5 backup point guard: "Not only is Boykins short. He is slight. One of Shaquille O'Neal's legs weighs more than Boykins. "Athletes his size are supposed to ride the favorite in the feature race at Santa Anita, not drive a basketball into the defense of angry shot-blockers. They should be fighting for the lightweight title or lining up corner kicks, or playing second base."
SPORTS
January 13, 2003
"Even when I looked down, I couldn't see him. He almost stole the ball from me. At the time, I thought it was someone from the audience." Yao Ming, Houston Rocket center, on the Golden State Warrior 5-foot-5 Earl Boykins.
SPORTS
January 5, 2003 | From Associated Press
At 5 feet 5, Earl Boykins doesn't have a lot of weight to throw around. Yet that's exactly what he did shortly after the Golden State Warriors signed him. In one of his first practices, Boykins stood in front of his new teammates and lectured them on the importance of desire and tenacity. After all, Boykins has shown an excess of both while scratching out an NBA career as the shortest player in the game. "He just stepped up and let us have it," Warrior guard Gilbert Arenas said.
SPORTS
November 20, 2001 | Bill Plaschke
Sitting in the stands at a recent Clipper game, staring intently at my nachos, I was startled by the shout of my young son. "Look!" he cried. "They're letting one of the ball boys play!" I looked. And, well, yes, dribbling downcourt in an oversized Clipper uniform was a little guy seemingly plucked from behind a baseline dust mop. The smallest professional athlete I've ever seen who was not astride a horse.
SPORTS
January 22, 2001 | LARRY STEWART
When you're in the midst of a five-game losing streak, you look for little things to brighten the outlook. For the Clippers, that would be 5-foot-5 Earl Boykins. Boykins, however, is contributing more than just a little. The night he was activated from the injured list, Jan. 7, he made a big splash against the Lakers, dazzling a Staples Center crowd with his speed and quickness. He had 11 points, three assists and one offensive rebound in the Clippers' 118-95 victory.
SPORTS
March 12, 1998 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's the Big Man on Campus, and the littlest man on the court. Eastern Michigan's Earl Boykins is a growing legend--and a shrinking one, if you believe the rosters. Listed at 5 feet 8 when he played at Cleveland's Central Catholic High, he shrank to 5-7 after he got to Eastern Michigan and 5-5 when he became a star. He'll be bigger than ever by the end of the day if Eastern Michigan can upset Michigan State in a first-round game of the NCAA East Regional tonight.
SPORTS
October 19, 2000 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Point guard Earl Boykins may be only 5 feet 5, but he has made a big impression in the exhibition season for the Clippers. After playing 25 games last season with Cleveland and 22 games combined the season before with New Jersey and the Cavaliers, Boykins has become a fan favorite with his strong push to make the Clippers' final roster.
SPORTS
January 15, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE
At some point in tonight's game against Indiana, Clipper Coach Alvin Gentry will insert Earl Boykins into the lineup and somewhere in the Conseco Fieldhouse crowd, someone will joke about his 5-foot-5 height. Boykins, who played in 25 games with Cleveland last season, is having fun showing people his skills, however. With more offensive game than the league's previous players shorter than 5-8, such as Spud Webb and Muggsy Bogues, Boykins is a defensive nightmare for opposing point guards.
SPORTS
January 9, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE
Point guard Earl Boykins might only be 5 feet 5, but don't be mistaken by his height. The Clippers have known that since training camp and are happy to see him finally get his chance to play. With rookie Keyon Dooling on the injured list until next week, Boykins made his Clipper debut as Jeff McInnis' backup against the Lakers on Sunday and Coach Alvin Gentry said the team is looking for ways to keep him on the active list.
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