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Earl Gustkey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Earl Gustkey, a Los Angeles Times sportswriter for more than 30 years who brought vitality to the paper's coverage of boxing, outdoor sports and the WNBA, has died. He was 69. Gustkey, who was diagnosed with leukemia in early March, died Friday of the disease at St. Vincent Hospital in Billings, Mont., according to his wife, Nancy Yoshihara. Gustkey had lived much of the time in Bozeman, Mont., since retiring from The Times in 2001.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Earl Gustkey, a Los Angeles Times sportswriter for more than 30 years who brought vitality to the paper's coverage of boxing, outdoor sports and the WNBA, has died. He was 69. Gustkey, who was diagnosed with leukemia in early March, died Friday of the disease at St. Vincent Hospital in Billings, Mont., according to his wife, Nancy Yoshihara. Gustkey had lived much of the time in Bozeman, Mont., since retiring from The Times in 2001.
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SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | Earl Gustkey
Dan Goossen used to be humble. In 1984, when his middleweight, Michael Nunn, was making $1,500 per fight, Goossen never seemed to have much to say. Now Nunn is the middleweight champion and making $1 million-plus per fight. He gets $5,000 for a personal appearance. And Goossen has become cocky. The other day, he was talking about a British promoter who was paying for Nunn and Goossen to fly first class to London for the Nigel Benn-Michael Watson middleweight fight May 21. Benn, who has reached the superstar level in England, will probably win. Then British tabloids will shriek for a Benn-Nunn bout.
SPORTS
September 1, 2001
Congratulations to Earl Gustkey on his retirement after 40 years of covering sports. Thank you and have a long, healthy and happy retirement. We'll miss seeing him at courtside at Pauley Pavilion for the women's basketball games. He was always among the first ones there. We agree with Earl that sports was meant for the amateurs, not for the million-dollar players and prima-donna athletes. Peter Lee Los Angeles Earl Gustkey's article about Lanton Kame was a wonderful reminder of the metaphor for life that made sports important to most of us in the first place.
SPORTS
May 1, 1989 | Earl Gustkey
Hector Lopez, the No. 1-ranked featherweight boxer from Glendale, had it all. Now he's about to lose it. Lopez is expected to serve about one year seven months in state prison on a first-degree burglary-gun charge, according to his attorney. Lopez will be sentenced July 26 in Pasadena Superior Court. Plea bargaining involving his attorney, Ralph Bencangey, and the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, has been completed. Last October, Lopez surrendered himself to Glendale police, who were seeking him on a charge of kidnaping his former girlfriend, Norma Gomez.
SPORTS
May 11, 1991
The article on Leon Patterson was one of the finest stories I have ever read in The Times. It was very warm and put a deep sensation in the heart for a person you only read about. High praise to Earl Gustkey. HARIBAD BARSAMEAN Pasadena
SPORTS
November 29, 1986
I was disgusted by Earl Gustkey's article on elk hunting on Santa Rosa Island. I do not understand why people need to kill helpless animals. Killing for fun places the killers on the lower rung of the evolutionary ladder than all other animals on this earth. STEVE ABERLE Los Angeles
SPORTS
January 31, 1987
Thanks to Bob Oates and Earl Gustkey for the informative profiles on the 28 NFL owners. The varied backgrounds of their lives, and how they got to where they are, was infinitely more interesting than reading about the players. I really enjoyed the piece, and would like to read similar ones on the owners of the other major sports. EDMUND MICHAEL DeFUSCO Silver Lake
SPORTS
September 1, 2001
Congratulations to Earl Gustkey on his retirement after 40 years of covering sports. Thank you and have a long, healthy and happy retirement. We'll miss seeing him at courtside at Pauley Pavilion for the women's basketball games. He was always among the first ones there. We agree with Earl that sports was meant for the amateurs, not for the million-dollar players and prima-donna athletes. Peter Lee Los Angeles Earl Gustkey's article about Lanton Kame was a wonderful reminder of the metaphor for life that made sports important to most of us in the first place.
SPORTS
November 2, 1996
I would like to commend Earl Gustkey on his article, "The NBA's Dirty Secret" [Oct. 28]. I cannot remember the last time that I cried over an article, but I'll never forget this one. I can never watch an NBA game again. ERIC HOUSEHOLDER Tujunga As an attorney who specializes in elder abuse litigation, I was outraged and saddened by Earl Gustkey's expose. How can this happen in the NBA's land of plenty? Surely the NBA can find some spare change for its founding fathers within the $3 billion that was grossed from last year's merchandising madness.
SPORTS
March 12, 2000 | By CHRIS DUFRESNE
MEN AUTOMATIC BIDS Arizona (26-6): Pac-10: Steals No. 1 in West and packs for Salt Lake City. St. John's (24-7): Big East: Think Barkley will want to play? Temple (26-5): Atlantic 10: Owls can make case for No. 1 in South. Saint Louis (19-13): Conference USA: Lorenzo Romar pulls off a minor miracle. Hofstra (24-6): America East: Flying Dutchmen take flying leap into tournament. Winthrop (21-8): Big South: Packer troubled because this was once a "girly" college. N.C.
SPORTS
July 25, 1998
I am outraged at the way that women's sports are covered by The Times. Let's face it, the success thus far of the WNBA should dictate a more knowledgeable approach to covering the games. The "powder puff" pieces that Earl Gustkey writes are insulting. In every one of his columns there is the implication that he is writing for people with no real knowledge of the game. There is no mention of trades that occur, or the inner workings of the team. There is no in-depth coverage going on here.
SPORTS
November 2, 1996
I would like to commend Earl Gustkey on his article, "The NBA's Dirty Secret" [Oct. 28]. I cannot remember the last time that I cried over an article, but I'll never forget this one. I can never watch an NBA game again. ERIC HOUSEHOLDER Tujunga As an attorney who specializes in elder abuse litigation, I was outraged and saddened by Earl Gustkey's expose. How can this happen in the NBA's land of plenty? Surely the NBA can find some spare change for its founding fathers within the $3 billion that was grossed from last year's merchandising madness.
SPORTS
November 13, 1993
Regarding the Nov. 6 letter: It doesn't feel so good to have the shoe fit on the other side, does it? Not weeks, but for years USC was always featured in the front pages, headlines splashed with articles and many photos of USC; whereas UCLA, if at all mentioned, was way inside. Answer to your question, "Are the Bruins getting more than their share?" It's about time. EMMA A. GUERRERO Alhambra Congratulations to reader Mark Ferris of La Crescenta. After his complaint of the Trojans not receiving equal coverage in the "UCLA Times," I pick up Thursday's paper only to find a picture of his Trojans on the front page of the sports section.
SPORTS
July 31, 1993 | EARL GUSTKEY
Moving day. Heading out. Final boxing column. After 11 years of covering boxing, I'll switch to college football next month. Final boxing theme: Gustkey's greatest hits. Here they are, my top 10 fights, 1982-1993--10 to remember, always: 1. Mike Tyson-Buster Douglas Feb. 10, 1990 An easy No. 1. An outstanding fight, but not a great one. But what dramatics. It may never be topped, not even in fiction.
SPORTS
July 24, 1993 | EARL GUSTKEY
There aren't many left now, the great boxing champions of America's Depression years. Billy Conn, a 1930s champion, died in May, and another champion died in a Fresno area nursing home Tuesday. Young Corbett III was 88 and had been ill for more than a decade. Corbett, whose given name was Ralph Giordano, was an Italian immigrant who grew up selling newspapers on the streets of Fresno. He became one of the great battlers of a period when America had a lot of great battlers.
TRAVEL
April 10, 1988
I read the Travel Section to find out about interesting places to visit and not to be exposed to people carrying guns ("New Life for an Old Ranch" (March 27) by Earl Gustkey) in a wilderness area waiting to blow a beautiful animal away. His "cute" reference to elk cheeseburgers was equally offensive. Anyone who thinks that killing defenseless creatures who caused no harm is a fun sport should be in a mental institution and not out there in our forests. I hope this is the last article of this type in the Travel Section.
SPORTS
June 8, 1985
I loved the piece on Babe Ruth by Earl Gustkey. To us old-timers who lived in the Bronx during the '20s and '30s, the mighty Babe will always be the No. 1 sports personality of all time. A few years back, before our own Fernando Valenzuela became a millionaire, I thought he just might replace the Babe in the hearts of the fans. But that didn't happen and it probably never will. BERNARD SIEGAL Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 17, 1993
Bobby Chacon found out this week that he still has a lot of fans. They still remember his spectacular fights at the Olympic Auditorium and the Forum in the 1970s and '80s. And many of them in the Southland boxing community called each other this week, trying to learn the latest on the Chacon watch. The onetime featherweight champion was reported missing this week, but the story had a happy ending. At least for now.
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