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Earl Lloyd

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SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | J.A. Adande
Long before they shared the stage, they set the stage. Earl Lloyd was the first African American to play in a league in which three-quarters of today's players are black. Spencer Haywood fought the legal battle that led to the now-common occurrence of high school seniors receiving their diplomas and draft-night handshakes from David Stern in the same month. Two living pages of the NBA history book addressed the sport's future guardians this week.
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SPORTS
May 3, 2004 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
Helen Lutrell, a 77-year-old widow, has a disdain for cursing. So much so that Lutrell, a season-ticket holder with the Class-A California League's Visalia Oaks since 1983, attends every game with a brush and squirt bottle, just in case. "I hate swear words," Luttrell told the New York Times. "I even told them before I got the box seat that I'd get on the boys. I show them the brush and tell them I'm going to wash their mouth out with soap, like their grandmas. They call me the No-Swear Lady."
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SPORTS
May 3, 2004 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
Helen Lutrell, a 77-year-old widow, has a disdain for cursing. So much so that Lutrell, a season-ticket holder with the Class-A California League's Visalia Oaks since 1983, attends every game with a brush and squirt bottle, just in case. "I hate swear words," Luttrell told the New York Times. "I even told them before I got the box seat that I'd get on the boys. I show them the brush and tell them I'm going to wash their mouth out with soap, like their grandmas. They call me the No-Swear Lady."
SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | J.A. Adande
Long before they shared the stage, they set the stage. Earl Lloyd was the first African American to play in a league in which three-quarters of today's players are black. Spencer Haywood fought the legal battle that led to the now-common occurrence of high school seniors receiving their diplomas and draft-night handshakes from David Stern in the same month. Two living pages of the NBA history book addressed the sport's future guardians this week.
SPORTS
October 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
NBA Commissioner David Stern said Thursday that "shocking" fraud by the Minnesota Timberwolves forced him to inflict record punishment over a secret contract for star forward Joe Smith. Stern stripped the Timberwolves of five first-round draft choices and fined the team $3.5 million for the agreement, which an arbitrator found was intended to circumvent the NBA salary cap.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, ruling on the oldest capital appeal on its docket, Monday upheld the death sentence of Earl Lloyd Jackson in the murders of two elderly Long Beach women in 1977. In a 5-2 decision, the justices rejected a recommendation by a special referee calling for the reversal of the sentence. Jackson, now 36, was one of only four convicted murderers whose death sentences were initially upheld by the liberal-dominated court under former Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird.
BOOKS
March 1, 1992 | KAREN STABINER
ELEVATING THE GAME: Black Men and Basketball by Nelson George (HarperCollins: $20; 261 pp.) Dr. James Naismith invented the game of basketball 100 years ago, at a YMCA in Springfield, Mass. It took another 59 years before a black man was allowed to play the game professionally, even though, as with baseball, there was a thriving circuit of barnstorming teams, and even greater enthusiasm in schoolyards around the country.
NEWS
April 22, 1987
Deputy state Atty. Gen. Pete Wilkinson said today's ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court will probably move two defendants in long-pending California cases closer to execution. Wilkinson said the decision may have the "most dramatic" impact in the case of Robert Alton Harris, whose death sentence for the murder of two San Diego youths in 1978 has been upheld by the state Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court.
SPORTS
March 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
George Karl became the highest-paid coach in professional sports and a part-owner of the Milwaukee Bucks. Terms weren't revealed, but a source with knowledge of the deal said the two-year extension is worth $14 million and also includes a small piece--believed to be 1% to 2%--of the franchise. Incentives could add another $1 million. Karl, who turns 50 in May, is committed to the Bucks through the 2003-04 season.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In what is becoming the state's most important death penalty case, a judge has again told state prosecutors to produce details on thousands of homicides to determine whether capital punishment as currently imposed is discriminatory. Defense lawyers are seeking the information to buttress their belief that prosecutors are more likely to seek the death penalty and juries are more willing to impose it if the murderer is a black man, and his victims were white, female or young.
SPORTS
October 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
NBA Commissioner David Stern said Thursday that "shocking" fraud by the Minnesota Timberwolves forced him to inflict record punishment over a secret contract for star forward Joe Smith. Stern stripped the Timberwolves of five first-round draft choices and fined the team $3.5 million for the agreement, which an arbitrator found was intended to circumvent the NBA salary cap.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, ruling on the oldest capital appeal on its docket, Monday upheld the death sentence of Earl Lloyd Jackson in the murders of two elderly Long Beach women in 1977. In a 5-2 decision, the justices rejected a recommendation by a special referee calling for the reversal of the sentence. Jackson, now 36, was one of only four convicted murderers whose death sentences were initially upheld by the liberal-dominated court under former Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird.
NEWS
August 18, 1985
Since California reinstated the death penalty in 1977, the California Supreme Court has upheld the death sentences of three murderers. The first person to be executed in California since 1967 is likely to be one of these men. Each is now using an appellate procedure called habeas corpus,which allows a defendant to raise any legal issue in an effort to overturn his sentence.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
State and local prosecutors Tuesday asked the state Supreme Court to abandon a sweeping, 3-year-old inquiry into thousands of capital cases to determine whether death sentences have been imposed discriminatorily in California.
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