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Earl Rogers

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MAGAZINE
January 8, 1989 | JACK SMITH
I HAVE ALWAYS wanted to tell, if only in brief, the story of Earl Rogers, the celebrated Los Angeles criminal attorney, but I hesitated to do so as long as his daughter, Adela Rogers St. Johns, was alive. She died recently at 94. Rogers was a genius and a drunk. In the almost 100 murder cases he pleaded, only one defendant was hanged. Most were probably guilty.
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MAGAZINE
January 8, 1989 | JACK SMITH
I HAVE ALWAYS wanted to tell, if only in brief, the story of Earl Rogers, the celebrated Los Angeles criminal attorney, but I hesitated to do so as long as his daughter, Adela Rogers St. Johns, was alive. She died recently at 94. Rogers was a genius and a drunk. In the almost 100 murder cases he pleaded, only one defendant was hanged. Most were probably guilty.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1991 | RAY LOYND
"Final Verdict" (at 5, 7, 9 and 11 tonight on TNT cable) is a slice of hothouse "L.A. Law" as practiced by the city's legendary criminal attorney Earl Rogers. What lifts the production above conventional courtroom drama is that the experience is seen through the eyes of the lawyer's 10-year-old daughter (who would grow up to be the famous newspaper woman Adela Rogers St. John and whose memoir, "Nora," is the basis of this movie).
BOOKS
June 24, 2007 | Richard Rayner
"READING and experience have taught me that when governments prepare for war, the first unit they mobilize is the liar's brigade," wrote Clarence Darrow in "The Story of My Life," which is extracted in the new collection "The Essential Words and Writings of Clarence Darrow" (Modern Library: 256 pp., $14.95 paper). His remark rings truer today than when Darrow first made it in 1932.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2011 | By Alison Bell, Los Angeles Times
In today's celebrity culture, there's no shortage of big names who ride the rollercoaster of success and shame. Just look at Charlie Sheen or Arnold Schwarzenegger. But those outsized celebs have nothing on Colonel Griffith Jenkins Griffith, the man who bequeathed to the city what is now Griffith Park. Griffith charmed the city of Los Angeles with his generosity, only to shock it later with an act of unhinged violence. Although he would grant Los Angeles two more major gifts, Griffith never completely resuscitated his reputation.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
A dark chapter from L.A.'s past -- the 1904 attempted-murder trial of mining magnate and philanthropist Griffith J. Griffith (of Griffith Park fame) -- is rescued from obscurity in "Crazy Drunk" at [Inside] the Ford.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
In show business, they're called "props," and the person who finds them is called "a prop master." In the courtroom, they're referred to in a more refined way--as "visual aids"--and the prop master goes by the title of lawyer. From the earliest days of the O.J. Simpson murder trial, both sides have turned to props to give more punch to their many words.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
The power of images to persuade, even manipulate, was hammered home in the O.J. Simpson trial Wednesday when he showed the jury his football knee and his lawyer displayed photographs of the sports hero clad only in briefs. Each of the dramatic exhibitions of the Simpson body made a powerful point for the defense case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2009 | Steve Harvey
Professional baseball got off to a slow start in Southern California. So slow that in 1898, the San Jose Prune Pickers and the Santa Cruz Beachcombers were chosen over the Los Angeles Angels to join the California League. Imagine, depriving rival fans the joy of chanting "Beat L.A.!" But the Angels, their status no doubt elevated when they were purchased by a pool-hall operator, were granted a franchise in the newly organized Pacific Coast League in 1903.
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