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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Kitty Wells, the long-reigning “Queen of Country Music” and the first woman to reach No. 1 on the country chart with her attitude-changing hit “It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels,” died Monday at age 92 of complications from a stroke. Wells was the most successful female singer of the 1950s, one of a small handful of women to have significant impact in country in an era when the music was overwhelmingly dominated by men. “She was the undisputed queen of country music,” singer Marty Stuart said Monday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film director Robert Wise, opera singer Marilyn Horne and actor James Earl Jones are among those chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony .
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bill Monroe, who combined fast-picking mandolin, banjo and guitar with a "high lonesome" singing style to create the distinctly American musical style known as bluegrass, died Monday. He was 84. The "Father of Bluegrass" died at a hospice in Springfield, Tenn., after suffering a stroke earlier this year, according to the Grand Ole Opry, where Monroe had performed since 1939.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | PAULA FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attending a special arts and humanities luncheon hosted by President and Nancy Reagan in 1983, Bill Monroe encountered Frank Sinatra--another luncheon guest--in one of the White House waiting rooms. Sinatra immediately approached Monroe, telling him how much he admired his work, mentioning specifics, most pointedly Monroe's early concerts at the Grand Ole Opry. Monroe's response was typical for this enigmatic and sometimes shrewdly controlling man: " 'Now what did you say your name was?'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2002 | Steve Hochman
Like a Bolt From Out of the Bluegrass Soundtrack producer T Bone Burnett said the biggest thrill of the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" success was the recognition that has come to bluegrass veteran Ralph Stanley and an unexpected turn of events a week ago. "The first song on the album is a work-gang song by James Carter and prisoners, recorded in 1952 at the Parchment Farm [prison] in Mississippi," Burnett said. "Alan Lomax went down there and recorded these chain-gang hollers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choral director Robert Shaw, who serves as principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony, was chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts, along with architect Robert Venturi, who designed a proposed addition for the La Jolla-based Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony.
NEWS
October 15, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--A misty-eyed Ricky Skaggs, who dropped out of high school in the 12th grade to play music full time, won the prestigious entertainer of the year award from the Country Music Assn. Skaggs received the honor, and the award for top instrumental group for his band, during the nationally televised CMA awards show at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. His award broke a three-year hold on the top honor by Alabama, a four-piece band that sought an unprecedented fourth straight selection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ricky Skaggs predicted recently that the next vein of country music to yield pay dirt well may be acoustic bluegrass, and if he's right, there's no one--except maybe Bill Monroe himself--more qualified to cash in than bluegrass veterans Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hartford, who wrote one of the most popular songs in modern pop music history and then retreated from the spotlight to pilot a riverboat and play his beloved bluegrass music, died Monday in Nashville of cancer. He was 63. Hartford's "Gentle on My Mind" became a Top 40 hit for Glen Campbell in 1968 (an earlier release of the single in 1967 peaked at No.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
The Stagecoach Festival now has the Eagles and an unofficial new motto: "Don't fence me in." Organizers of the huge country festival in Indio have announced a surprise third day of music and, by booking the bestselling country rock band ever, the May event is broadening its fan base and genre embrace. The newly announced day, May 2, will also feature performances by John Fogerty, Trisha Yearwood, Shelby Lynne, Glen Campbell and newcomer Rissi Palmer.
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