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Earl T Shinhoster

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August 21, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NAACP board of directors voted nearly unanimously Saturday to oust Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. because of his management of the organization's finances and handling of a former aide's sexual discrimination complaint. Board Chairman William Gibson told reporters Saturday night that "after immense deliberation (it) has voted to end the tenure of Benjamin F. Chavis as its executive director." He added: "This decision was not easy nor pleasant."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000
Earl T. Shinhoster, 47, who served as acting executive director of the NAACP in the mid-1990s. A resident of DeKalb, Ga., Shinhoster recently had served as director of the NAACP's People's Voter Empowerment project, a national voter registration and education program. He also had been involved in efforts to raise census participation among blacks. Active with the NAACP for 30 years, Shinhoster served in several senior positions including national field secretary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000
Earl T. Shinhoster, 47, who served as acting executive director of the NAACP in the mid-1990s. A resident of DeKalb, Ga., Shinhoster recently had served as director of the NAACP's People's Voter Empowerment project, a national voter registration and education program. He also had been involved in efforts to raise census participation among blacks. Active with the NAACP for 30 years, Shinhoster served in several senior positions including national field secretary.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NAACP board of directors voted nearly unanimously Saturday to oust Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. because of his management of the organization's finances and handling of a former aide's sexual discrimination complaint. Board Chairman William Gibson told reporters Saturday night that "after immense deliberation (it) has voted to end the tenure of Benjamin F. Chavis as its executive director." He added: "This decision was not easy nor pleasant."
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | Associated Press
Faced with a $3.8-million deficit and an order to rein in spending by 40%, the NAACP will cut staff and may close some of its offices. "It has become clear that the first priority for our new leadership must be to put our financial house in order," said Myrlie Evers-Williams, chairwoman of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People. Cuts to the 74-member core staff will be substantial, and some of the seven regional offices will probably be merged, said Earl T.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | United Press International
The NAACP has called for the removal of Confederate flags flying above state capitols in South Carolina and Alabama. The flags are symbols of "divisiveness, racial animosity and an insult to black people throughout the region," said a resolution passed Saturday by the NAACP at its 35th Southeast Regional Conference. The resolution also called for the removal of the Confederate Stars and Bars from state flags in Georgia and Mississippi, which do not fly the Confederate flags above their capitols.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
Only days after the NAACP fired Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. as executive director and minutes after a judge refused to reinstate him, Chavis and organization leaders agreed Wednesday to discuss an amicable settlement of their bitter dispute. Superior Court Judge Herbert Dixon declined Chavis' request Wednesday for a temporary restraining order, saying he could no more order the NAACP to take Chavis back than he could force Chavis to continue to work against his wishes.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
The NAACP opens its national convention today facing challenges from within and without, including financial turmoil and a string of setbacks from the Supreme Court. "We think this is really going to be a very important convention for the NAACP, if not the most important convention we've had in years," said Earl T. Shinhoster, acting executive director of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People. The NAACP is struggling with a $3.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
A package containing what appeared to be a tear-gas bomb was mailed to the Southeastern regional headquarters of the NAACP and injured eight people when it spewed gas throughout an office building. Civil rights leaders denounced the attack as apparently racist, and federal officials said they will investigate to see if civil rights were violated.
NEWS
July 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
In her first keynote address to the NAACP annual convention, Chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams urged members Sunday night to fight challenges to the group's triumphs over the last 86 years. There has never been a more critical need for the NAACP, Evers-Williams told a crowd of about 3,000 at the Minneapolis Convention Center. "We work in an environment filled with paranoia, doubt and despair, all of which beckon the storm clouds of divisiveness, fear, scapegoating and racism," she said.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On April 9, 1993, Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the freshly elected NAACP executive director, struck a confrontational pose as he attempted to reverse the moribund image of the 85-year-old civil rights organization. Sixteen months later, Chavis was history--fired last weekend, in the words of one board member, for racing the group's engines "too hard, too fast." Now it's back to the future for the NAACP.
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