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Earle C Anthony

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Things seem to happen by chance at the corner of Olympic Boulevard and Hope Street in downtown Los Angeles. It's where in 1922 Packard automobile dealer Earle C. Anthony accidentally launched the city's commercial broadcasting industry when he put a radio transmitter on his roof so he could talk to fellow car dealers in the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Things seem to happen by chance at the corner of Olympic Boulevard and Hope Street in downtown Los Angeles. It's where in 1922 Packard automobile dealer Earle C. Anthony accidentally launched the city's commercial broadcasting industry when he put a radio transmitter on his roof so he could talk to fellow car dealers in the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Los Angeles is widely recognized as the birthplace of what has come to be called "the car culture." Few people, however, recall that the godfather of that sort-of-blessed event was a mechanic turned merchant prince named Earle C. Anthony. Long before the internal combustion engine replaced equine transit on Los Angeles' streets, Anthony--a self-taught teenage mechanic--put the city on the horseless carriage map when he designed and built L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Los Angeles is widely recognized as the birthplace of what has come to be called "the car culture." Few people, however, recall that the godfather of that sort-of-blessed event was a mechanic turned merchant prince named Earle C. Anthony. Long before the internal combustion engine replaced equine transit on Los Angeles' streets, Anthony--a self-taught teenage mechanic--put the city on the horseless carriage map when he designed and built L.A.'
HOME & GARDEN
October 14, 2004
Re "Best House in a Leading Role" [Oct. 7]: There can be peril for neighbors of movie houses too. In "Big Business," an early Laurel and Hardy movie, the boys get in a scramble with a guy in front of his house. He trashes their car, they trash his house. At the end, the house is nearly demolished. Producer Hal Roach liked to tell the story that the film crew set up in front of the wrong house, much to the consternation of the owners, who came home from vacation to find their house destroyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | Tim Rutten
More than any other modern American city, Los Angeles' history is inextricably intertwined with that of its police force. John Buntin's "L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America's Most Seductive City" makes an important and wonderfully enjoyable contribution to our understanding of that interplay. This is a highly original and altogether splendid history that can be read for sheer pleasure and belongs on the shelf of indispensable books about America's most debated and least understood cities.
NEWS
August 28, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Carl Haverlin, a veteran radio executive credited with bringing Broadcast Music Inc. into the front ranks of music rights organizations and the man who put both the Rose Bowl game and the Los Angeles Philharmonic on the air, died Monday. He was 86 and died at a Canoga Park hospital. Haverlin, who began with Broadcast Music Inc. in the 1930s as an $85-a-week field representative, rose through the ranks to become its president, retiring in the mid-1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1988 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
I smelled Los Angeles before I got to it. It smelled stale and old like a living room that had been closed too long. But the colored lights fooled you. The lights were wonderful. There ought to be a monument to the man who invented neon lights. --"The Little Sister," by Raymond Chandler In 1923, automobile dealer Earle C. Anthony brought back a pair of jewel-like, orange-and-blue signs from Paris and displayed them at his Packard dealership on the corner of Wilshire and La Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2012 | Bob Pool
They're not kidding when they say they'll leave the light on for you. A long-forgotten neon lamp that was switched on during the Great Depression and left burning for about 77 years has been discovered hidden behind a dusty partition at Clifton's Cafeteria. The find was made amid an extensive renovation of the downtown eatery, according to the building's owner, Andrew Meieran. The neon fixture is believed to have been installed in 1935 when Clifford Clinton purchased the lease to Boos Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jesuit Father John D. McAnulty, who founded a retreat center in Los Angeles for Catholic priests and served as its director for more than 25 years, has died. He was 88. McAnulty died Saturday at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, Calif., after a lengthy chronic illness, the California Jesuit provincial office announced. After McAnulty suggested starting a ministry dedicated to priests, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles opened the center in 1975.
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