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Earle Palmer Brown

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BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Franklin & Associates Advertising & Public Relations, San Diego's largest ad agency and a subsidiary of troubled Great American Bank, has agreed to be acquired by East Coast agency Earle Palmer Brown for an undisclosed price. Franklin's accounts include Great American, the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Padres.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Franklin & Associates Advertising & Public Relations, San Diego's largest ad agency and a subsidiary of troubled Great American Bank, has agreed to be acquired by East Coast agency Earle Palmer Brown for an undisclosed price. Franklin's accounts include Great American, the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Padres.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Franklin & Associates Advertising and Public Relations, San Diego's largest ad agency and a unit of troubled Great American Bank, has agreed to be acquired by East Coast agency Earle Palmer Brown for an undisclosed price. Franklin's accounts include Great American, the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Padres. Great American has been trying to sell Franklin for the past six months at the urging of federal regulators, who are forcing savings and loans back to traditional lines of business.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Franklin & Associates Advertising and Public Relations, San Diego's largest ad agency and a unit of troubled Great American Bank, has agreed to be acquired by East Coast agency Earle Palmer Brown for an undisclosed price. Franklin's accounts include Great American, the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Padres. Great American has been trying to sell Franklin for the past six months at the urging of federal regulators, who are forcing savings and loans back to traditional lines of business.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
With his rifle butt raised, an Israeli soldier appears prepared to strike one of three Palestinian women pictured cowering on the ground. "Israel Putting Your Tax Dollars to Work," reads the headline above the photograph, which is part of a carefully planned advertising campaign by a Washington-based pro-Arab lobby. At a cost of $10,250, the advertisement has been placed in more than 200 Washington-area subway cars during the peak tourist season. The ad, scheduled to run through Aug.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY, Times Staff Writer
Several hundred Hollywood High School students left their books Wednesday to boo, cheer and otherwise help Marriott Corp. stage a publicity stunt for the hotel giant's Big Boy Restaurants--and all with the blessing of the school's educators. Donating $5,000 for Hollywood High's gymnasium and student body, Marriott held a rally replete with cheerleaders and flag-waving teen-agers to announce that the 46-year-old Big Boy symbol had won a monthlong battle to be retained by the restaurant chain.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When the cutting-edge San Francisco ad agency Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein won the $25-million Carl's Jr. ad business last week, one West Coast fast-food industry executive joked: "I suppose ol' Carl Karcher will get on the air now and deck Ronald McDonald." Far from it. The ad agency's co-founder and creative head, Jeffrey Goodby, says Carl's Jr. commercials will now take great pains to show Carl's as a swell, folksy, family-run restaurant chain.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He's nerdy-looking, awkward, often unshaven and has been known to spray you when he talks. Hardly the kind of guy you'd choose to do lunch with. Except his name is Bill Gates. And in spite of his quirks, or perhaps because of them, the youthful chairman of mighty Microsoft Corp. has become the stuff of corporate legend, a cultural figure so closely watched that his 1987 breakup with a girlfriend was emblazoned across the supermarket tabloid the Star.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Basketball fans, glued to their television sets, have been watching their favorite players shoot and dribble away during the NBA playoffs. Executives like John Morgan, however, hope that the fans pay attention to the player's shoes as well as their shots. Morgan is marketing director of Reebok International, the athletic shoemaker that, like its competitors, is showing off its basketball shoes on the air and on players themselves during the National Basketball Assn. finals.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY, Times Staff Writer
When Sun Oil decided to diversify in 1976, the company dropped "Oil" from its name and refashioned its corporate symbol into a yellow sphere that one executive calls "the fried egg logo." Then it told its 15 subsidiaries to create their own images, using whatever graphic designs or symbols struck their fancy. Three years later, Sun had a mess on its hands.
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