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Early Adopters

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OPINION
April 27, 2012 | By Jocelyn Y. Stewart
In the Louisiana parish that was home to generations of my family, people lived hard lives as field hands or sharecroppers, laboring from "can see in the morning" to "can't see at night. " They hoed and picked cotton, corn, peas and other crops; they understood the planting cycle; they ate locally grown fruits and vegetables without ever visiting a supermarket. Long before the terms "eco-friendly" and "environmentalism" came into vogue, generations of Americans embraced the principles of recycle, reuse, reduce without ever naming them.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - At 6 feet 4 inches, JR Curley is used to getting noticed. Just not like this. Ever since he got a pair of Google Glass in November, he has been turning heads at the grocery store, in restaurants, on the street, even at Disneyland. People approach him all the time to ask about his head-mounted, Internet-connected computer, which is worn like a pair of glasses. He spends so much time letting them try on Glass that his wife has begun referring to herself as the "Glass bystander.
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OPINION
March 20, 2009
Re "Hybrid vehicle sales go from 60 to 0 at breakneck speed," March 17 Nowhere in The Times' otherwise thorough article is even passing mention given to the environmental benefits of increasing the number of hybrid vehicles on the road. Like many other early adopters, I chose to get my first hybrid almost a decade ago because of the vastly cleaner emissions and lower environmental impact. Somewhere along the way, however, fuel consumption trumped cleaner air as the news peg for hybrids.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google Glass is a nifty piece of tech, but to some designers its dorky cyborg look is not the most attractive. Among them is Sourcebits, a San Francisco design and development firm that recently picked up a couple of Google Glass devices and was not impressed by the design. "We thought it was too futuristic and didn't have a mainstream appeal," said Rahul Nihalani, the product director at Sourcebits. "We thought we could do a better job. " So they did. PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 Nihalani and his team created rendered images of what they think Google Glass should look like.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2008 | Alana Semuels
It must have been tough to be a delegate at the Democratic National Convention -- you had to know when to scream for Hillary Rodham Clinton, when to scream for Barack Obama and when not to scream. And then you had to learn the art of shaking hands and networking while listening for really important announcements about, for example, someone somewhere offering free pizza. Life may be easier if you have a swanky cellphone. At least, that's the marketing pitch a pack of companies made as they pushed their mobile-related products to the Democrats in Denver.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google Glass is a nifty piece of tech, but to some designers its dorky cyborg look is not the most attractive. Among them is Sourcebits, a San Francisco design and development firm that recently picked up a couple of Google Glass devices and was not impressed by the design. "We thought it was too futuristic and didn't have a mainstream appeal," said Rahul Nihalani, the product director at Sourcebits. "We thought we could do a better job. " So they did. PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 Nihalani and his team created rendered images of what they think Google Glass should look like.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The Chevrolet Volt, the first mass-market electric vehicle from General Motors Co., will have a sticker price starting at $41,000 when it hits showrooms this year, but it was the attractive lease offer that the automaker announced Tuesday that grabbed the attention of industry analysts. Chevrolet plans to offer a lease program on the Volt with a monthly payment as low as $350 for 36 months plus $2,500 due at lease signing, a deal that could speed up adoption of the new generation of automobiles by making them competitive with traditional gasoline-powered vehicles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2008 | DAVID SARNO
YOUTUBE IS dreaming of a warm, fuzzy future in which erstwhile video pirates clink steins with media CEOs -- the viewing needs of the one at last aligned with the pay schedules of the other -- and boozily toast the technology that changed it all, back in '08. Yes, after years of work, scientists in Silicon Valley finally are deploying computer systems intelligent enough to watch online videos -- so humans don't have to. Huzzah! Until now, copyright owners wishing to defend their rights online have had to employ real live people to seek out and neutralize infringing material.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | from Associated Press
The earlier the adoption, the better a child does in adolescence, according to a study of teens adopted when they were babies. The study issued late last month casts doubt on the belief that adopted teen-agers are more likely to be troubled than others their age. Early adoption is "the key in the successful attachment of child to parents, and vice versa," said study co-author Peter Benson, a psychologist. "We cannot overstate its power."
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
In the last month, Google has been handing out the first editions of its much-anticipated Glass wearable computer devices to a select group chosen to try it out. One of them was avid bicyclist and science-fiction writer Margo Rowder, who was invited to pick up the high-tech eyewear at a Google office in Los Angeles. All those selected to buy the glasses must pick them up at a Google office and go through a Google initiation-like process. Rowder allowed me to tag along and experience the whole process with her. She applied to receive an invitation to the Google Glass Explorer program in February, telling Google she was interested in using the device to help her get around Los Angeles on her bike.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
In the last month, Google has been handing out the first editions of its much-anticipated Glass wearable computer devices to a select group chosen to try it out. One of them was avid bicyclist and science-fiction writer Margo Rowder, who was invited to pick up the high-tech eyewear at a Google office in Los Angeles. All those selected to buy the glasses must pick them up at a Google office and go through a Google initiation-like process. Rowder allowed me to tag along and experience the whole process with her. She applied to receive an invitation to the Google Glass Explorer program in February, telling Google she was interested in using the device to help her get around Los Angeles on her bike.
OPINION
April 27, 2012 | By Jocelyn Y. Stewart
In the Louisiana parish that was home to generations of my family, people lived hard lives as field hands or sharecroppers, laboring from "can see in the morning" to "can't see at night. " They hoed and picked cotton, corn, peas and other crops; they understood the planting cycle; they ate locally grown fruits and vegetables without ever visiting a supermarket. Long before the terms "eco-friendly" and "environmentalism" came into vogue, generations of Americans embraced the principles of recycle, reuse, reduce without ever naming them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- Emily Castor's metallic gray Honda has been driven by dozens of people she's never met. They treat it well, pay any tickets they get and do the dirty work of finding a legal parking spot when they return it to her neighborhood near Golden Gate Park. Castor, 29, is pulling in hundreds of dollars each month through one of several personal car-sharing companies that have burgeoned in the Bay Area over the last year. For $8 an hour or $45 a day, renters can climb behind the wheel of her Civic.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2011 | Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Gas prices are rising, and drivers are fretting. But not Roy Olson. The Rancho Mirage retiree drives a plug-in hybrid electric Chevrolet Volt, which he said runs for about 40 miles on battery before switching to traditional fuel. Because he charges the car nightly, Olson has yet to visit a gas station. "Having our future in our own hands is really important," he said. "I'm insulated from what's going on in the Middle East. If I had to pick one reason for getting this car, that's probably No. 1. " Olson is part of a small group of auto fanatics, environmentalists and technology enthusiasts who bought the first batch of Volts and Nissan's all-electric Leafs that rolled out in December.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The Chevrolet Volt, the first mass-market electric vehicle from General Motors Co., will have a sticker price starting at $41,000 when it hits showrooms this year, but it was the attractive lease offer that the automaker announced Tuesday that grabbed the attention of industry analysts. Chevrolet plans to offer a lease program on the Volt with a monthly payment as low as $350 for 36 months plus $2,500 due at lease signing, a deal that could speed up adoption of the new generation of automobiles by making them competitive with traditional gasoline-powered vehicles.
OPINION
March 20, 2009
Re "Hybrid vehicle sales go from 60 to 0 at breakneck speed," March 17 Nowhere in The Times' otherwise thorough article is even passing mention given to the environmental benefits of increasing the number of hybrid vehicles on the road. Like many other early adopters, I chose to get my first hybrid almost a decade ago because of the vastly cleaner emissions and lower environmental impact. Somewhere along the way, however, fuel consumption trumped cleaner air as the news peg for hybrids.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2011 | Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Gas prices are rising, and drivers are fretting. But not Roy Olson. The Rancho Mirage retiree drives a plug-in hybrid electric Chevrolet Volt, which he said runs for about 40 miles on battery before switching to traditional fuel. Because he charges the car nightly, Olson has yet to visit a gas station. "Having our future in our own hands is really important," he said. "I'm insulated from what's going on in the Middle East. If I had to pick one reason for getting this car, that's probably No. 1. " Olson is part of a small group of auto fanatics, environmentalists and technology enthusiasts who bought the first batch of Volts and Nissan's all-electric Leafs that rolled out in December.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - At 6 feet 4 inches, JR Curley is used to getting noticed. Just not like this. Ever since he got a pair of Google Glass in November, he has been turning heads at the grocery store, in restaurants, on the street, even at Disneyland. People approach him all the time to ask about his head-mounted, Internet-connected computer, which is worn like a pair of glasses. He spends so much time letting them try on Glass that his wife has begun referring to herself as the "Glass bystander.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
When the news hit this week that Amazon was releasing a Kindle for iPhone, I jumped to get it. No matter how much I love books, I'd developed a definite longing for the Kindle. It was partly my fondness for new technologies, partly the (perhaps late) realization that e-readers are likely here to stay and partly, no doubt, Amazon's successful hype over the Kindle 2. And this was a way to get a taste of the Kindle without shelling out the $359. So I went to the iTunes store and downloaded the free Kindle app. Then I looked around iTunes trying to find an e-book to read.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2008 | Alana Semuels
It must have been tough to be a delegate at the Democratic National Convention -- you had to know when to scream for Hillary Rodham Clinton, when to scream for Barack Obama and when not to scream. And then you had to learn the art of shaking hands and networking while listening for really important announcements about, for example, someone somewhere offering free pizza. Life may be easier if you have a swanky cellphone. At least, that's the marketing pitch a pack of companies made as they pushed their mobile-related products to the Democrats in Denver.
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