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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
White House officials announced Friday that California will be among nine states to share a $500-million grant for early childhood development programs, the latest chapter in the Obama administration's "Race to the Top" program in which states apply and compete for federal dollars. This is the first time federal officials have used the program for pre-kindergarten education. President Obama said in a statement that "we're acting to strengthen early childhood education to better prepare our youngest children for success in school and in life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Democrats in the state Senate want to use an upcoming jump in education funding to make transitional kindergarten available to every 4-year-old in California. The proposed investment in early childhood education, which would total nearly $1 billion a year once the program is fully phased in by 2020, is another sign of the state's rebounding financial health. "The era of cutting education in California is over," said Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2002 | From Times Staff Writers
An early childhood learning center to help parents prepare their children for school has an open house today. The Learning Link Center, operated by the Capistrano Unified School District, offers early childhood education and health and family-support services. The focus is on literacy, writing and arts. There is also a library with books in English and Spanish. A nurse and speech specialist are available for health screenings. The center is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Shirley Temple Black's early childhood home in Santa Monica sold for its asking price of $2.489 million in less than two weeks of coming on the market. The Spanish style-house, built in 1926, features vaulted wood beam ceilings, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,966 square feet of living space. The yard is planted with apricot, apple and plum trees. Black, 85, starred in such hit films as “Bright Eyes,” “Curly Top” and “Heidi” during the 1930s and won an honorary Juvenile Academy Award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
The County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday appointed Corina Villaraigosa, wife of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, to the First 5 LA commission. She will help oversee planning for early childhood development, health and education programs throughout the county. Villaraigosa, a teacher, will take her place Thursday on the 13-member panel. The commission manages an annual budget of $209 million. She was nominated by the commission's chairwoman, Supervisor Gloria Molina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Stanley I. Greenspan, a psychiatrist who documented the developmental milestones of early childhood and developed the widely used "Floor Time" method for teaching children with autism and other developmental disorders, died April 27 at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., of complications from a stroke. He was 68. According to the Interdisciplinary Council on Developmental and Learning Disorders, which offers training in the Floor Time technique, Greenspan was "the world's foremost authority on clinical work with infants and young children with developmental and emotional problems.
NEWS
November 30, 2008 | David Crary, Crary writes for the Associated Press.
In one classroom, a group of preschool teachers squatted on the floor, pretending to be cave-dwelling hunter-gatherers. Next door, another group ended a raucous musical game by placing their tambourines and drums atop their heads. Silly business, to be sure, but part of an agenda of utmost seriousness: to spread the word that America's children need more time for freewheeling play at home and at school. "We're all sad, and we're a little worried. . . . We're sad about something missing in childhood," psychologist and author Michael Thompson told 900 early-childhood educators from 22 states packed into an auditorium this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1990 | DIANNE FEINSTEIN
The president of the California Trucking Assn. recently told me that the industry finds many high school graduates unable to fill out an employment application properly. Today, one out of three high school students in California drops out by the 10th grade. Our classrooms are among the most overcrowded in the country. And despite the fact that achievement-test scores have been improving, our students still perform below the national average. So what can we do?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Computer mogul Bill Gates' charitable foundation donated $1 million Monday to a Beverly Hills nonprofit organization founded by actor and director Rob Reiner to raise public awareness about the importance of early childhood development. With the grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the I Am Your Child Foundation will expand its promotion of good parenting techniques and its support for national groups and state agencies that focus on early childhood health and learning.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2009 | By Stephanie Banchero
Shantell Thomas stood in front of her son's strawberry-flavored birthday cake, jaw clenched, knuckles white from the ferocious grip she had on the 10-inch carving knife. A dozen rowdy youngsters behind her pushed toward the cake, jostling Thomas and knocking Styrofoam cups off the table. Jabari, the 1-year-old birthday boy, sat on his aunt's lap nearby and wailed. Thomas wheeled around and raised the knife. "Back the F up!" she yelled, catching herself before a curse could slip out. "Or I'm 'bout to cut some necks off."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
Using a method similar to California's to fund early-childhood education, President Obama is proposing a tax hike for his "Preschool for All" plan in the budget presented to Congress. The proposed 94-cent hike on cigarettes is projected to generate more than $78 billion over 10 years. Some Los Angeles-based early-childhood education providers praised the proposal for its plan to fund education for preschoolers across all types of socioeconomic backgrounds. “The president's plan falls right in line with what [Los Angeles Universal Preschool]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't that she didn't see the value of reading to her young daughters. The problem, Mayra Rodriguez said, was a lack of confidence. Today, Rodriguez regularly reads to her 4-year-old daughter and noted how quickly the girl picked up on colors and numbers. Soon she'll be reading to her 1-year-old. The 27-year-old Alhambra resident is a product of Reading is Fundamental of Southern California's WIC Early Childhood & Family Literacy Program, which operates at its centers in Pico Rivera and East Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Too much TV may do more than interfere with a child's grades, it also might affect his or her athletic  development -- a potential problem for those parents who dream of raising the next Michael Phelps or Serena Williams. A study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity is believed to be the first to document the relationship between how much TV screen time a child logs and later explosive leg strength -- a key indicator of athletic prowess.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
1. Indianapolis Colts: QB Andrew Luck, Stanford - The last time the Colts had the No. 1 pick in the draft was 1998, when they selected Peyton Manning. Luck spent his early childhood in London, England, and Frankfurt, Germany, where his father, Oliver, was the GM of two World League of American Football teams prior to becoming league president. Oliver went to high school in Houston, where he was co-valedictorian of his class. Comment: Because the Colts are rebuilding, that should buy Luck some time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
White House officials announced Friday that California will be among nine states to share a $500-million grant for early childhood development programs, the latest chapter in the Obama administration's "Race to the Top" program in which states apply and compete for federal dollars. This is the first time federal officials have used the program for pre-kindergarten education. President Obama said in a statement that "we're acting to strengthen early childhood education to better prepare our youngest children for success in school and in life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson
Monte Factor, a Beverly Hills clothier and arts patron who co-founded the End Hunger Network and a groundbreaking Los Angeles child-care center, died Dec. 5 at Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles Medical Center, his daughter Diane announced. He was 94. With actor Jeff Bridges and others in the entertainment industry, Factor started the nonprofit End Hunger Network in 1983 to raise awareness of childhood hunger and help end it. He happened to live next door to Ted Danson, another actor involved with the organization, the Toronto Star noted in 1989.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Childhood obesity may be a hot-button health issue, but weight-related problems may begin before children start preschool. A new report, "Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies," from the Institute of Medicine released Thursday puts the spotlight on infancy and the toddler years, suggesting that child care providers, government programs and physicians be vigilant, noticing when kids are too large for their size, and promoting more activity and...
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
First memories—a trip to the hospital, an ice cream cone at the beach—change as children get older, a new study finds, and don’t crystallize until about age 10.  But the study raises new questions about why the first few years of life, aside from traumatic events, are so forgettable. BrainConnection from PositScience offers this perspective on what’s known as infantile amnesia: “Studies suggest that we're not simply forgetting what happened during our earliest years; far fewer autobiographical memories exist from early childhood than simple forgetting predicts.
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