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Early Spring

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NEWS
February 3, 1995 | Associated Press
Punxsutawney Phil, possibly the world's most famous forecaster, failed to see his shadow as he was hauled from a man-made burrow Thursday, indicating--according to legend--that winter is almost over. A crowd of about 7,000 cheered loudly as the announcement of the groundhog's prediction was made under overcast, chilly skies.
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NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
It might be a bit brisk during the months of this round-trip airfare special from LAX  to Warsaw on Aeroflot, but the price will warm your heart: $733, which includes all taxes and fees. It is subject to availability, and you must stay a Saturday night for travel between Jan. 24 and April 12. Warsaw's motto - "It defies the storms" - refers to its tumultuous history (it has been destroyed and rebuilt several times, mostly recently during World War II), rather than its weather.
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NEWS
February 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
An outdoor bash that looked like a summertime rock concert, complete with bare-chested men and fireworks, was a fitting prelude Sunday to Punxsutawney Phil's forecast: Spring is nearly here. The sky was cloudy on Groundhog Day and the celebrated rodent failed to see his shadow at sunrise, just the 12th time that's happened in 111 years of Pennsylvania prognostications. (The last time, in 1995, turned out to be a bad guess.
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By David Karp
Rhubarb is one of the great joys of spring, with its rosy color, earthy tang and old-fashioned allure, and the story of its local rise and fall is as intriguing as its flavor. Just a generation or two ago, it was widely cultivated in Southern California, but now local rhubarb is available almost exclusively at farmers markets, and just from a handful of vendors. Rhubarb is native to central and northern Asia, where its roots were harvested for millenniums for their medicinal properties.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nevermind that the fall season is still held off by the waning days of summer. Resolute gardeners are venturing into their landscape to begin preparing for early spring of 1995. This seasonal work starts every September. Fall is a favored time to sow an array of plants in Southern California--and included at the top of the list are perennials.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to maintain some of the sales momentum of the holiday shopping season, retailers are developing strategies to generate customer traffic in January and February. Many retailers will continue to use novelty items--such as Mickey Mouse ties and other products bearing the image of popular characters--to generate excitement among shoppers. Department stores are turning to discount pricing to sell everything from washing machines to wash-and-wear clothing.
REAL ESTATE
March 2, 1986
By early spring all of Little Tokyo Square will be open for business and pleasure. Signs already are up, and the words "Little Tokyo Square" now appear on this newest 200,000-square-foot complex at 3rd and Alameda streets. The mall walkway will open soon with a new pedestrian entrance on 3rd Street, in addition to the Alameda Street entrance, which has been open since last September. A feature of the square will be its entertainment center occupying the entire third level of the mall.
HOME & GARDEN
December 7, 1991
Gardens often seem forlorn and forgotten when gray skies linger overhead, but there are lots of blooming flowers that love the cool temperatures of winter and early spring. Listed below are some of the hardier ones: English primrose (Primula polyantha) : It's a sturdy variety with a 12-inch stem sporting a large cluster of inch-wide flowers and available in a wide range of colors.
SPORTS
April 8, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
C.J. Wilson's earned-run average in the warmth of Arizona and Dodger Stadium was 1.11 as the Angels' $77.5-million left-handed addition to the pitching rotation cruised to a 4-0 exhibition record. Tough, however, to simulate pitching in an icebox there. Now, Orange County's Wilson makes his regular-season debut in the frigid conditions of early spring in Minnesota, where he'll oppose the Twins' Nick Blackburn Monday at Target Field. “Nothing you can do, just adjust,” Wilson said.
SPORTS
April 8, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
C.J. Wilson's earned-run average in the warmth of Arizona and Dodger Stadium was 1.11 as the Angels' $77.5-million left-handed addition cruised to a 4-0 spring-training record. Tough, however, to simulate pitching in an icebox there. Now, Wilson makes his regular-season debut in the chilly conditions of early spring in Minnesota, where he'll oppose the Twins' Nick Blackburn on Monday at 1 p.m. Pacific time at Target Field. "Nothing you can do, just adjust," Wilson said.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
An unseasonably warm winter has given way to an early spring -- and that's making some folks just a bit nervous. It's not because the weather hasn't been lovely. But  the fluctuating temperatures have confused flora and fauna. Consider parts of the East Coast. On March 23, the mercury hit 83 degrees near Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.  This week daily highs in the East Coast have dialed back to “seasonal temperatures,” said Brian Lasorsa, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service's Washington office.  On Friday temperatures near the airport capped off at 58 degrees.
SPORTS
March 12, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Reporting from Tempe, Ariz. — Howie Kendrick struck what looked to be a routine single to left-center field, but he was intent not to treat the situation routinely. The Angels' No. 2 hitter sprinted hard around first base and didn't slow before sliding safely at second with a first-inning double Sunday. The play epitomizes how the Angels aspire to treat these exhibition games. Before losing to the Dodgers, 9-1, on Monday at Diablo Stadium, they began the day as baseball's spring leader in team batting average (.343)
NATIONAL
April 29, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Though Anchorage is postcard-pretty in the summer, it's trashy in early spring, when the snow melts to reveal a bad case of the uglies -- from routine litter to old mattresses and junked cars. But each year, the trash and junk disappears as hundreds of volunteers hit the streets in a weeklong cleanup just in time for the tourist season.
FOOD
March 7, 2007 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Just in Page mandarins: It used to be that we called them tangerines and they were a Christmas treat. Today we know better. There is a wide variety of these small, easy-to-peel citrus fruits and the season extends well into spring. In fact, with no offense to the satsumas and clementines we've been enjoying so far, now is when mandarins really start to get interesting. A perfect example is the Page.
SPORTS
February 4, 2006
While many people rely on Punxsutawney Phil each Groundhog Day to signal whether we're headed for a longer winter, my personal indicator has always been the date The Times' sports section relegates the Clippers to the inside pages, never to be seen on the front page again until next season. Given the Clippers' performance this season, by my calculations, it appears as if we're headed for an early spring. RON YUKELSON San Luis Obispo
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
THE man striding purposefully up the trail above Agoura Hills could be Clint Eastwood, what with his sharp nose and squinting blue eyes. He even wields a sharp object menacingly as he scans the terrain. But the lone figure in the wilderness is no high-plains drifter. He is amateur botanist David Ecklund, a 60-year-old Vietnam veteran, and his weapon of choice is a common garden hoe. The enemy: "invasive nonnative" plants that are crowding out native wildflowers.
SPORTS
February 4, 2006
While many people rely on Punxsutawney Phil each Groundhog Day to signal whether we're headed for a longer winter, my personal indicator has always been the date The Times' sports section relegates the Clippers to the inside pages, never to be seen on the front page again until next season. Given the Clippers' performance this season, by my calculations, it appears as if we're headed for an early spring. RON YUKELSON San Luis Obispo
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