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NEWS
April 4, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five grueling weeks, negotiators preparing for a major, multinational environmental summit in Brazil remained deadlocked Friday over significant issues that have dogged them through four long international conferences. The matters left unfinished here and the possibility of a deadlock over separate global warming issues sharpened the possibility that the summit, set for June in Rio de Janeiro, could fall short of the high hopes for its success.
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NEWS
April 4, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five grueling weeks, negotiators preparing for a major, multinational environmental summit in Brazil remained deadlocked Friday over significant issues that have dogged them through four long international conferences. The matters left unfinished here and the possibility of a deadlock over separate global warming issues sharpened the possibility that the summit, set for June in Rio de Janeiro, could fall short of the high hopes for its success.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Citizens for Peaceful Resolutions will hold the 2002 Earth Charter Community Summit from 7:45 a.m. to noon today in the Internet Cafe in the Ventura College cafeteria. Matt Peterson, president of Global Green, will discuss how to encourage a global shift in values toward a more secure world. The summit is open to the public and donations will be accepted. For more information, call 649-3523. Ventura College is at 4667 Telegraph Road.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time running out on Earth Summit negotiators, U.S. delegates Tuesday considered attempting to rewrite portions of a "Rio Declaration" to be issued at the close of the conference, raising the possibility that the controversial document could be destroyed. Although the declaration of general principles for protecting the environment was supposedly completed weeks ago, government delegations and environmental activists have roundly criticized it.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1992 | MURRAY WEIDENBAUM, MURRAY WEIDENBAUM is director of the Center for the Study of American Business at Washington University in St. Louis
The June Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro yielded two results readily predictable by any seasoned cynic (and forecast by this observer). First and most obvious, many of the more vocal environmental activists were disappointed that far stronger action was not taken. They blamed the United States primarily for the shortfall from their expectations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2002 | Jenifer Ragland, Times Staff Writer
Robert Dodge stood at the end of his Ventura driveway one morning in March, looking in disbelief at a newspaper headline: "U.S. Works Up Plan for Using Nuclear Arms." It was the latest in a string of headlines that had left the Ventura physician depressed about the violent direction the world seemed to be heading since Sept. 11. And for him, it was the last straw.
OPINION
March 1, 1992 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
In the run-up to the huge summit on environmental crisis and economic development, scheduled for Rio de Janeiro in early June, the atmosphere--already sulfurous with mutual recriminations between the First and Third Worlds--has been further fouled by a memorandum circulated by a top World Bank official. The World Bank is located at the strategic crossroads where economic counsel and loans flow from the rich nations to the poor ones.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
William K. Reilly, the chief of the U.S. delegation at a global environmental summit here, was rebuffed by the White House on Thursday after suggesting changes to a biological diversity treaty to allow President Bush to sign the pact, knowledgeable Administration sources said. The sources said Reilly, who had discussed the possibility of changes with Brazilian government officials, sent the White House a memorandum outlining possible revisions from the summit here this week. U.S.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | ALISON CARPER, Alison Carper is a reporter for New York Newsday.
MAURICE STRONG LAYS DOWN HIS FORK in the National Portrait Gallery's great hall and heads determinedly to the podium. Around him, at circular tables arranged beneath a stained-glass dome, about 80 Washington insiders, corporate executives and Bush Administration officials push back from their poulet en croute and wait politely.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Earth Summit, hailed as the world's boldest reach for international collaboration, ends today as a success more for its promise than its achievements. A risky proposition from the start, the global conference produced an ambitious new agenda for environmentally sound development and moved to level the playing field between the world's poor and rich. "I was afraid when we began," confessed Singapore's Tommy Koh, the summit's most influential negotiator. "The gap seemed too formidable.
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