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NEWS
September 14, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of deliberation, a panel of outside experts has recommended that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration scrap plans to put six huge scientific platforms in space to gather information for studies of global warming.
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NEWS
September 14, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of deliberation, a panel of outside experts has recommended that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration scrap plans to put six huge scientific platforms in space to gather information for studies of global warming.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1999
America's record budget surplus has left the nation more able than ever to reach for the stars, but to the astonishment of scientists a House appropriations subcommittee on Monday approved a spending bill that increases most federal agency budgets but takes a $1.4-billion bite out of NASA's budget. That's 11%. Worse, the cut tends to target the agency's most cost-efficient and significant projects.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not a great deal bigger than a dishwasher, an ordinary-looking box no more impressive than its own packing crate. It would fit nicely into an empty corner and make a good perch for a potted plant or--in the old days--an ash tray. But looks are deceiving. The unimpressive black cube, to be delivered to a government laboratory at Princeton University in two months, is in fact a new Cray YMP supercomputer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2006
Crescent City, Calif.,where 11 died in a tsunami in 1964, was hit last week by a wavecaused by a quake off the Russian coast. This time no one died andthere was little damage when a surge estimated at about 5 feet flowedinto the harbor. The earthquake was monitored by the Deep OceanAssessment and Report of Tsunamis, or DART, a system of sensors andbuoys that monitors earthquake and tsunami activity. An alert wasissued last week, but it was canceled more than five hours before thetsunami struck.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The price tag of a system to gather crucial new data on global climate warming has soared to more than $30 billion from an original estimate of about $12 billion, and the Bush Administration has asked the National Academy of Sciences to review the skyrocketing cost and the possibility of using smaller, less expensive satellites, Administration sources said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989
Nobody expects the bottom to fall out of U.S. defense spending. Cuts will come gradually. But even if Washington took a terrible swift sword to the Pentagon budget, Southern California would not be devastated. In fact, if some defense savings were invested in space projects, the region would be better off with less defense spending. These are among the pleasant surprises in a study of the consequences of an immediate one-third cut in defense funds, an extreme and unlikely scenario.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush asked Congress on Monday to lay out more than $1 billion in the coming fiscal year to better understand and begin confronting the threat of global warming. The initiatives on climate change accounted for half of a $2-billion increase requested for environmental protection. "President Bush means business when he says he is an environmental President," said Environmental Protection Administrator William K.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of magnetic tapes containing irreplaceable scientific data from American space missions are deteriorating--and perhaps damaged beyond repair--because of improper storage and management, the General Accounting Office said Friday. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has stored at least 1.
WORLD
December 29, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
United Nations officials and leaders of some Asian nations Tuesday called for the creation of a tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean like the one that exists in the Pacific. Tsunami experts said that while such a network is created, there are low-tech, relatively inexpensive methods to help the region guard against future disasters.
SCIENCE
December 28, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Elizabeth Shogren and Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writers
Within minutes of the massive earthquake off the coast of Indonesia, U.S. scientists whose job is to scan for signs of tsunamis suspected that a deadly wave was spreading through the Indian Ocean. Had the quake happened in the Pacific Ocean, a network of monitoring stations established after previous tsunamis would have enabled scientists to produce specific warnings for coastal areas. Such warnings might have saved thousands of lives.
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