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Earth Planet

NEWS
February 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Astronauts aboard the space shuttle Endeavour ended their ambitious Earth-mapping work Monday after some anxious moments closing a hatch. Bad weather forced them to consider landing at a seldom used strip in New Mexico. Following a final mapping pass over Australia, the astronauts began to stow their equipment for today's scheduled landing, but there was trouble with the 20-story radar mast deployed just hours after their Feb. 11 liftoff.
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NEWS
January 18, 2001
Feeling big? Go to http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/ NewImages/Images/earth_lights_lrg.jpg for an idea of how small and insignificant you really are. Using a series of satellite images originally intended for the study of clouds by moonlight, scientists at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration compiled an image of our planet at night. It's cool, but it's also a little unnerving--particularly north of the equator.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A 100-foot-wide space rock hurtled past Earth only 26,500 miles away -- the closest asteroid ever detected by astronomers before it actually made its approach. The harmless flyby occurred at 2:08 p.m. PST. "We figure that on average, something this size hits the Earth every two to three years," said astronomer Paul Chodas of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program. "We've never detected them out in space, either approaching or receding. This is the closest."
SCIENCE
March 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A detailed survey of birds and butterflies in Britain shows a population decline of 54% to 71%, a finding that suggests the world may be undergoing the sixth big extinction in Earth's history, this one caused by humans. In a series of population surveys that combed virtually every square yard of England, Scotland and Wales over 40 years, more than 20,000 volunteers counted each bird, butterfly and native plant they could find.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Dramatically pushing back the emergence of life on Earth by nearly 400 million years, scientists Wednesday said they have found chemical traces in the world's oldest known sediments that suggest that simple life forms thrived 3.85 billion years ago. The discovery could be the first evidence of the primordial microbes that arose when inanimate matter organized itself into the earliest living molecules.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For astronomers and star warriors who already view the night sky with foreboding, the cataclysm that convulsed Jupiter last week was a possible preview of the fate of Earth, which one day may be caught off-guard by a stream of natural warheads--comets or asteroids on a collision course with the home planet.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Seismic echoes from a powerful Chinese nuclear test have helped U.S. scientists develop a new process for looking deep within the Earth that has already produced remarkably sharp images of the white-hot layer of gooey rock surrounding the planet's core. Using the new process, John E. Vidale and Harley M. Benz of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park were able to detect an "island" as small as 60 miles across in the layer atop the Earth's molten iron core.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1990
Was the CIA misreading the Soviet economy ("CIA Misread Soviet Economy," Part A, Aug. 3) since 1950 or misleading the American government? Surely, the leaders of the CIA would rather be seen as well-meaning bunglers than as disinformers, especially in view of recent events in Eastern Europe; yet I wonder if the agency wasn't really being artful in its overestimation of Soviet economic achievements during the last 40 years. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Most children are not taught that the Earth is round until they are about 10 years old and in the fourth grade, according to a survey conducted for the National Science Teachers Assn. As a result, they rely on their own perceptions and assume that the Earth is flat. The study found that 95% of second graders thought that the Earth is flat. The proportion who knew the Earth to be round did not exceed 50% until the fourth grade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1988
The earth's protective ozone layer has been thinning out around the world, not just over the South Pole, according to a new analysis of satellite data that was promptly disowned by the government agency that sponsored the study. Writing in the latest edition of the widely respected Science magazine, Kenneth P.
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