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OPINION
March 21, 2014
Re "Experts warn climate shift threats rising," March 19 I for one am outraged. Scientific consensus is approaching 100% that human civilization is in danger. But our politicians choose to be fooled and intimidated by corporate lobbyists. The fossil fuel industry has spread lies to counter the urgent facts about climate change. It is particularly frustrating when the costs and benefits of transitioning to a renewable future are calculated. According to a recent study, a carbon tax in California, with the revenue returned to the public, would actually grow the state's economy.
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SCIENCE
September 19, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have done the math, and according to their calculations, life on Earth has 1.75 to 3.25 billion years left to thrive. And that's if a giant asteroid or a nuclear war doesn't finish us off first. Yes, there is a big difference between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years, but predicting the end of life on our planet is not an exact science, at least not yet. To arrive at that 1.5-billion-year doomsday spread, graduate student Andrew Rushby of the University of East Anglia in Britain created two slightly different equations that estimate the length of time Earth will remain in the "habitable zone" around the sun.  A planet is considered to be in the habitable zone when liquid water can exist on its surface.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
A geomagnetic storm may be on its way this weekend, and it could be dazzling. Forecasters at NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center say there is a good chance that there will be a geomagnetic storm, or a disturbance in the Earth's magnetic field, this weekend after the solar flare that erupted on the sun Thursday morning. Although Thursday's solar flare was the biggest yet in 2013, it was classified as a mid-level flare. It was still strong enough to cause a brief radio blackout NASA said.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
A defunct NASA satellite, whose doomed descent gained worldwide notoriety, fell back to Earth early Saturday — but exactly when or where the fiery plunge took place could forever be a mystery. "We may never know," said Nicholas Johnson, NASA's chief orbital debris scientist. It probably plunged into the Pacific Ocean, perhaps somewhere between Hawaii and the western coast of North America. There have been no reports of discovered pieces or injuries, further suggesting the debris didn't make it to land, he said.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
A storm warning has been issued for space, where a "cannibal" coronal mass ejection grabbed the attention of space-weather watchers. The sun -- at a peak of activity in the 11-year solar cycle -- hurled a pair of CMEs that reached Earth early Saturday morning, Pacific time. The ejections, as NASA's Alex Young says, "are a huge release of solar material, billions of tons, and magnetic field. "  Upon reaching Earth, they can wreak havoc with our power grid --  and, on the bright side, create gorgeous auroras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990
In response to Lee Dye's article "Galileo Views Earth With an Alien's Eye" (front page, Dec. 20): In light of all the endless conflicts between men across our planet, Galileo, the spacecraft, seems to have discerned the root of the problem--"it detected no clear sign of intelligent life" on planet Earth! MARILYN E. WHITAKER, Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2009
When Giants Walked the Earth A Biography of Led Zeppelin Mick Wall St. Martin's Press: 504 pp., $27.99
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1989
Larry Stammer's report from London, "Saving the Earth: Who Sacrifices?" (Part I, March 13) and the editorial "A Truce With Nature" on the same day give a dire prognosis on the state of the Earth's health. Hopefully, such information will help arouse the consciousness of people as to the sacrifices it will be necessary for us all to make if we are to survive. I wonder, do we stand by and watch our magnificent planet and all the life it holds being destroyed in the same manner we have allowed the continuation of the building of nuclear weapons, spending billions and billions of dollars each year while people starve and our Earth suffers?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010
"Stop the world, I want to get off" is an old refrain, but what if it actually happened? The consequences for life as we know it are considered in the new special "Aftermath: When the Earth Stops Spinning." (National Geographic, 6 and 9 p.m. Mon.)
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