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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
Billed as "the largest collaboration of media creation in the world's history," "One Day on Earth" is a compilation documentary built for these short-attention-span times. Drawn from 3,000-plus hours of footage from every country on the planet, taken by volunteer videographers on a single day in October 2010, the film is driven by a we-are-the-world connectedness, but remains a travelogue in search of a defining center. FOR THE RECORD: "One Day on Earth": A review of the film "One Day on Earth" in the June 22 Calendar section referred to an image of a Ukrainian bride's painted face.
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SCIENCE
August 12, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Geochemists studying Arctic rocks say they have found evidence of ancient rock from the interior of the Earth that is nearly as old as the planet itself. Such material gives scientists an idea of what the mineral structure of the inner Earth used to look like billions of years ago and may force them to adjust their theories about the evolution of the planet's structure over the eons, said Matthew Jackson, a geochemist at Boston University and lead author of the paper. The findings are published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
An asteroid the size of a truck zipped past Earth on Friday night, and you probably missed it. Asteroid 2013 LR6 is 30 feet in length, or a bit more than half the size of the space rock that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February. It made its closest approach to our planet on Friday night at 9:42 p.m. PDT, according to a release from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. At that time, the asteroid was just 65,000 miles from the Earth's surface, or about a quarter of the average distance between Earth and the moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The science fiction movie "After Earth" marks a homecoming of sorts for star Will Smith, a Philadelphia native. A major portion of the Columbia Pictures movie, which opens Friday, was filmed at the new Sun Center Studios outside Philadelphia that is also not far from where director M. Night Shyamalan was raised. In "After Earth," Smith plays a general who returns to earth with his son -- played by Jaden Smith -- 1,000 years after humans have left. Although some key scenes of the film were shot in the redwoods of Northern California , as well as in Costa Rica and Utah, Sun Center Studios wasted no time touting its own ties to the movie -- and its Hollywood stars.
SCIENCE
November 8, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Heads up! A satellite is expected to fall to Earth sometime Sunday night or Monday morning, and scientists can't say yet where it will land. The satellite, known as GOCE, has been circling our planet since 2009, when it was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) to map Earth's gravity. It weighs 2,425 pounds, and its altitude has been dropping since late October, after it ran out of fuel.  GOCE is a bit bigger than a Volkswagen van, but it won't be crashing to Earth in one piece.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists studying Martian clouds have created them right here on Earth. Using a cloud chamber in Germany and rock from the Mojave Desert, their experiment shows that the Red Planet's ice clouds often need far more humidity to form than clouds on Earth. The findings, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, show that Martian clouds form under very different conditions than many scientists once thought - which may help researchers to better understand the planet's water cycle.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
On the 529th day of Curiosity's journey on Mars, the rover turned its cameras to the skies and sent back this humbling image of Earth and our moon. Our planet and moon appear as two small dots in the Martian sky, no bigger or more significant than Mars or Jupiter look to us. The image was taken Jan. 31 Earth time, 80 minutes after the sun set on Mars. Although Earth and the moon look small, they are currently the two brightest bodies in the Martian night sky, according to a release from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  If you or I were standing on the Martian surface, we would have no trouble seeing our home planet with the naked eye.  PHOTOS: Moons of the solar system Earth does not always appear so bright on Mars.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
It's 1.7 miles long. Its surface is covered in a sooty black substance similar to the gunk at the bottom of a barbecue. If it impacted Earth it would probably result in global extinction. Good thing it is just making a flyby. Asteroid 1998 QE2 will make its closest pass to Earth on May 31 at 1:59 p.m. PDT. Scientists are not sure where this unusually large space rock, which was discovered 15 years ago, originated from. But the mysterious sooty substance on its surface could indicate it may be the result of a comet that flew too close to the sun, said Amy Mainzer, who tracks near-Earth objects at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge . It might also have leaked out of the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, she said.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Looking for a sign that the Republican Party might have some leaders who can appeal to younger voters? Mitt Romney cited the Beach Boys, Garth Brooks and the Eagles among his favorite musicians, but Sen. Marco Rubio raised some eyebrows Monday with hat tips to N.W.A and Public Enemy. Rubio, 42, who has sparked early 2016 presidential hype with a headlining visit to Iowa over the weekend, spoke to GQ about a number of topics, but his opinions on music and the Earth's age overshadowed his perspective on President Obama and young Republicans.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poring over images of Saturn's icy moon Iapetus, planetary scientists have discovered massive landslides in which the falling ice travels much farther than should be possible given the coefficient of friction of the falling ice. In one spectacular case in the moon's Malun crater, ice broke off the wall of the 5-mile-deep crater and surged 22 miles across the crater floor -- an unusually long distance. Given that cold ice has a relatively high coefficient of friction, such long distances should not be possible unless there are forces at work that researchers don't yet know about, said planetary scientist William McKinnon of Washington University in St. Louis, who led the team studying the landslides.
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