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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sophy Po waited with impatience as she sat primly on a canvas stool, an archeologist's vest hanging artlessly off her shoulders. "Found anything yet?" the fifth-grader demanded of a classmate, who scooped up a handful of sand and sifted meticulously for artifacts. When the classmate shook her head in reply, Sophy urged: "Deeper, deeper!" Around her, sumac and lupine sprouted high. A menagerie of wild animals peered down curiously from the branches of a shady oak and from atop a rocky overhang.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
A skunk, a bobcat and an owl were among animals seen by a group of 15 students at Reseda Elementary School on Thursday morning as they entered the Earthmobile, a reconstruction of a canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains built inside a 48-foot tractor-trailer. The sight of the animals frightened some of the children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
A skunk, a bobcat and an owl were among animals seen by a group of 15 students at Reseda Elementary School on Thursday morning as they entered the Earthmobile, a reconstruction of a canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains built inside a 48-foot tractor-trailer. The sight of the animals frightened some of the children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sophy Po waited with impatience as she sat primly on a canvas stool, an archeologist's vest hanging artlessly off her shoulders. "Found anything yet?" the fifth-grader demanded of a classmate, who scooped up a handful of sand and sifted meticulously for artifacts. When the classmate shook her head in reply, Sophy urged: "Deeper, deeper!" Around her, sumac and lupine sprouted high. A menagerie of wild animals peered down curiously from the branches of a shady oak and from atop a rocky overhang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
The Valley Focus page June 5 was especially positive reading in these times of the usual disaster, murders, children killing parents and their school classmates. Listing the articles: "New Kidney Center Opens at Hospital," "Future Guide Dogs Need Foster Parents," "Earthmobile Brings Nature to Students," "Mock Trial Teaches Kids About Courts," "Class Gets a Hands-On Lesson in Giving," "Group Organizes Its 15th Cleanup Day," and on page B4: "Cleaning Up Their Act; Members of entertainment industry use show business techniques to keep students out of gangs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995
1. WEIRD MUSEUM 1641 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood A collection of real mummies, skeletons, the reputed remains of a werewolf and the "Hand of Glory," a 300-year-old mummified hand of an executed murderer that allegedly has the power to grant invisibility. Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Admission $3. (213) 462-7078. 2. INTERNATIONAL BRASSIERE MUSEUM * 6608 Hollywood Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | CAROL CHASTANG
EARTHMOBILE: Students at 15th Street Elementary School in San Pedro became archeologists for an hour Wednesday in a make-believe canyon complete with stuffed raccoons, California quail, skunks, desert weeds and Native American artifacts. The canyon was inside a 48-foot air-conditioned tractor-trailer called the "Earthmobile," which visited the school as part of a natural history program sponsored by the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum.
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