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Earthquake Fault

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
A lawyer for opponents of a controversial Hollywood skyscraper project criticized the developer and city officials for not disclosing important facts about an earthquake fault that may be directly underneath the site. The Millennium Hollywood project has come under increased scrutiny after the City Council approved the project 13 to 0 last month. The head of the California Geological Survey then told The Times the Hollywood fault's path might go underneath the site of the towers and said his office would accelerate a block-by-block mapping to trace the fault's path.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
An unmanned submarine set to dive more than 1,000 feet to scour the bottom of Lake Tahoe didn't quite make it all the way.  During shallower test dives earlier this month, the submarine encountered complications with a few of its motors, said Gordon Seitz with the California Geological Survey. The engineers who created the vessel considered the problems serious enough that they didn't want to risk diving it all the way to the bottom of the lake, he said.   The 28-foot-long, 2,200-pound submarine, designed to explore beneath the ice shelves of Antarctica, was diving Lake Tahoe in its first test run. Seitz and his team hoped to capture valuable data and high-definition images of an earthquake fault along the lake's bottom that scientists have wondered about for years.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny submarines capable of diving to extreme ocean depths are at work off the Oregon coast researching undersea volcanoes and taking pictures of hot water vents where exotic sea worms reside above the Pacific subduction zones. The work has been well-publicized in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | Rosanna Xia, Rong-Gong Lin II and Doug Smith
The developer of  a planned apartment complex   near Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street has hired geologists to dig underground to search whether an earthquake fault intersects the property.  A trench study, considered by experts as the gold standard for fault-finding, is now underway at a site just east of the controversial Millennium Hollywood skyscraper project.  A  draft map released  last month by the California Geological Survey...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Los Angeles officials have asked the developer of a controversial Hollywood skyscraper project to conduct a new round of seismic tests to determine whether the project's towers could be at risk in an earthquake. At the same time, state officials are carrying out their own geological study of the area to find out whether a known fault line near the building site is active. The questions surrounding the project's safety come at a critical time, with the City Council poised to take up a major vote on the proposal Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson agreed Tuesday to reconsider a proposal he had made for a future school site in a large development proposed for Porter Ranch, after school officials pointed out that the site is alongside a potentially active fault. "If there is any question about it, we should look into it, and obviously we're not going to set aside any site if it is not deemed to be safe," Bernson said. "I'm not locked into that site." Bernson suggested that the Los Angeles Unified School District's concern about the fault is a political tactic by school board member Julie Korenstein, who is involved in a heated reelection campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Michael Finnegan and Rosanna Xia
The developers of a Hollywood skyscraper project said Friday they have agreed to dig a trench on the property to help determine whether an earthquake fault runs under it. Officials at New York-based Millennium Partners said that they do not believe the Hollywood fault runs underneath the project, but that if a fault was found, they would not build over it. Extensive digging under the site is considered by seismic experts to be the best way...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Over objections of Central Coast residents and environmental groups, Pacific Gas & Electric plans to map earthquake fault zones near its Diablo Canyon nuclear plant by blasting high-decibel air cannons under the surface of the ocean. PG&E's plan calls for towing a quarter-mile-wide array of underwater "air cannons" that emit 250-decibel blasts into the ocean every 15 seconds for 12 straight days. The sonic reflections would be picked up by underwater receivers and analyzed to provide detailed 3-D images of the geometry, relationships and ground motions of several fault zones near the Diablo facility, which generates enough energy to meet the needs of more than 3 million Northern and Central Californians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
An earthquake fault line should not be drawn underneath Blvd6200, one of Hollywood's largest residential and commercial projects, a lawyer for the developer said Thursday. The lawyer, John M. Bowman, told the state Mining and Geology Board that the fault line drawn by the California Geological Survey "is not clearly detectable … and therefore is not sufficiently well-defined to be included on the map. " A geologist for the developer, Reinard Knur, said he wants to do more studies to support their request the state either delete that section of the fault or move it farther north on its new proposed zoning map. The developer performed some studies this week and plans to submit additional information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
California geology officials will hold a public hearing Thursday on a proposed earthquake zone in Hollywood that would lead to restricted development in the rapidly growing area.  The public hearing for the  Alquist - Priolo  Earthquake Fault Zoning preliminary maps will begin at 9 a.m. Thursday in the  Junipero  Serra Building in downtown  Los   Angeles . The maps, which will be finalized this summer by the California...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
An earthquake fault line should not be drawn underneath Blvd6200, one of Hollywood's largest residential and commercial projects, a lawyer for the developer said Thursday. The lawyer, John M. Bowman, told the state Mining and Geology Board that the fault line drawn by the California Geological Survey “is not clearly detectable … and therefore is not sufficiently well-defined to be included on the map.” A geologist for the developer, Reinard Knur, said he wants to do more studies to support their request that the state either delete that section of the fault or move it farther north on its new proposed zoning map. The developer performed some studies this week and plans to submit additional information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | Rosanna Xia, Rong-Gong Lin II and Doug Smith
The developer of  a planned apartment complex   near Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street has hired geologists to dig underground to search whether an earthquake fault intersects the property.  A trench study, considered by experts as the gold standard for fault-finding, is now underway at a site just east of the controversial Millennium Hollywood skyscraper project.  A  draft map released  last month by the California Geological Survey...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Rosanna Xia, Rong-Gong Lin II and Doug Smith
A state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would close a loophole that has allowed developers to build projects on or near dangerous earthquake faults. California law already bans the construction of new buildings on top of faults that have been zoned by the state. But more than two dozen major faults have not been zoned, and a Times review found some buildings had been constructed along them. Statewide, about 2,000 of California's 7,000 miles of faults have not been zoned, and the building ban is not enforced in those areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
Gov. Jerry Brown vowed to increase funding to map California earthquake faults, calling the effort an important public safety measure. “We'll do whatever it takes. And the people of L.A. should be cautious because earthquakes are just around the corner," Brown said at a news conference on Thursday. Budget cuts stalled the state's efforts to zone earthquake faults across California, including the well-known Hollywood and Santa Monica faults in the Los Angeles area. The Times found that without state zoning, numerous buildings were approved for construction on or near the faults without extensive seismic review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles city officials have announced the initial scope of a study to determine the health and safety risks posed by an earthquake fault and pockets of methane gas reportedly under the controversial Playa Vista project on the Westside. The study is set to begin in August and is expected to take at least four months. It will focus on the area where the first 3,246 houses will be built, on 169 acres of the overall 1,087-acre residential and commercial project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013
Join us at 9 a.m. when we talk with Times reporter Rong-Gong Lin II about a luxury residential tower that Los Angeles city officials approved and that the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority says sits atop an earthquake fault line. When Los Angeles officials approved plans for the 39-story tower in Century City, they declared the site suitable for development without a review of earthquake faults. Not long after, the   MTA   examined the area as the site for a subway station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014
Join Times staff writers Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia for a discussion starting at 9 a.m. Friday about the implications of this week's release of new state geological maps.   The maps show that several major developments planned in Hollywood are actually much closer to an active earthquake fault than Los Angeles city officials initially said they were. Interactive map: Do you live or work in the Hollywood fault zone? The maps show a zone of about 500 feet on both sides of the fault, and state law requires any development within the zone to have substantial underground seismic testing to see if the fault runs under it. Developers are not allowed to build on top of faults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing a sharp increase in the state budget to map earthquake faults in California, after months of reports about how the state's effort has been hobbled by budget cuts over the last two decades. Brown is seeking enough money from lawmakers to increase the number of scientists who find earthquake faults from one to four -- a staffing number not seen in 20 years. Brown's plan calls for $1.49 million in new funding specifically for fault mapping for the next fiscal year.
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