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Earthquake Safety

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Tuesday announced an aggressive new plan to tackle earthquake safety, including how to better protect vulnerable buildings. Marking the 20th anniversary of the destructive Northridge earthquake, Garcetti said Los Angeles would for the first time partner with the U.S. Geological Survey to build a comprehensive strategy for dealing with how to better protect private buildings and other resources such as telecommunications and the water supply during a major temblor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council committee agreed Tuesday to push forward a proposal to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame that is vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake. Reporting to a City Council planning committee, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau at the Department of Building and Safety, laid out a plan to winnow out these so-called soft story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Scientists who have a list of concrete buildings in Los Angeles that could be at risk of collapsing in a major earthquake will meet with L.A. officials Tuesday to discuss their research. The group is led by UC Berkeley engineering professor Jack Moehle, who has so far not agreed to provide the list to the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety. The agency asked for the list at the direction of Mayor Eric Garcetti. Last month , Moehle wrote that the university was "investigating the legal and ethical constraints " of releasing preliminary research data. Moehle had earlier  rejected  a verbal request by the city for the information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
At 10:17 a.m. Thursday, students at Rosemont Elementary School in Echo Park jumped under their desks as a simulated earthquake drill ensued and they followed firefighters' orders to drop, cover and hold on. Some of the students had fake injuries -- gashes to their legs and arms and blood painted on their faces -- and firefighters rushed to them, gauging their injuries and carrying some of them away to safety. "What's your name? Where are you hurt?" the firefighters asked. INTERACTIVE: Map of L.A.'s hidden earthquake dangers The drill was part of the preparation for the ever-looming "Big One" and part of the Great California ShakeOut -- a day of drills involving millions of people across the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan, Rosanna Xia and Ari Bloomekatz
Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday he was considering a new “chief resilience officer” to oversee preparations for a major earthquake and ensure Los Angeles can minimize the disaster's damage. Garcetti's suggestion for a top coordinator of earthquake issues came as he prepares to announce what he called “some very concrete steps” to enhance seismic safety in a city with a long history of deadly temblors. “The problem is there are lots of different pieces of this, but there's nobody at City Hall who ultimately is kind of the earthquake expert, so I'm looking at that,” Garcetti said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan, Rosanna Xia and Ari Bloomekatz
Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday he was considering a new "chief resilience officer" to oversee preparations for a major earthquake and ensure Los Angeles can minimize the disaster's damage. Garcetti's suggestion for a top coordinator of earthquake issues came as he prepares to announce what he called "some very concrete steps" to enhance seismic safety in a city with a long history of deadly temblors. "The problem is there are lots of different pieces of this, but there's nobody at City Hall who ultimately is kind of the earthquake expert, so I'm looking at that," Garcetti said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and Rosanna Xia
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is facing a tangle of unforeseen political and legal challenges as he grapples with what action the city should take to identify and reinforce hundreds of old concrete buildings that may be at risk of collapse in a major earthquake. Responding to a Times report of structurally vulnerable buildings that could expose thousands to injury or death, Garcetti said in an interview that he was "interested in creative ways of making buildings safer. " But he raised concerns about the city's potential liability if it publicly identifies structures at risk of failing during violent shaking in a major quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and Rosanna Xia
Council members Tom LaBonge and Bernard Parks submitted separate motions Tuesday calling on the city to review and conduct reports on the earthquake safety of the city's older concrete buildings. The motions follow a Times report on concrete buildings that were built before 1976. By the most conservative estimate, as many as 50 of the more than 1,000 old concrete buildings in the city would collapse in a major earthquake, exposing thousands to injury or death. LaBonge's motion asks for the city's Department of Building and Safety to take the “first step” and report on possible ways to conduct “a comprehensive survey of non-ductile concrete buildings (built prior to 1976)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and Rosanna Xia
Council members Tom LaBonge and Bernard Parks submitted separate motions Tuesday calling on the city to review and make reports on the earthquake safety of the city's older concrete buildings. The motions follow a Times report on concrete buildings that were built before 1976. By the most conservative estimate, as many as 50 of the more than 1,000 old concrete buildings in the city would collapse in a major earthquake, exposing thousands to injury or death. INTERACTIVE: L.A.'s hidden dangers LaBonge's motion asks for the city's Department of Building and Safety to take the "first step" and report on possible ways to conduct "a comprehensive survey of non-ductile concrete buildings (built prior to 1976)
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