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Earthquake

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A magnitude 5.7 earthquake struck Northern California on Thursday night and was felt across a large area, according to officials. The quake was occurred around 8:47 p.m., and its epicenter was 27 miles southwest of Susanville and seven miles west northwest of Greenville, about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento, and zero feet deep, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. A Chico resident told The Times that he felt a slow steady roll that lasted about 30 seconds. People on Twitter reported feeling the quake in Sacramento.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Some residents in Long Beach and the north Orange County coast reported feeling and hearing what some thought was an earthquake Wednesday afternoon. But Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton said no earthquakes were reported in the area during the time the shaking was reported. “It's not an earthquake. It's probably an offshore sonic boom,” Hutton said. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said any sonic boom would come from a military aircraft.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 3.1 earthquake was reported Tuesday evening 13 miles from Shandon, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 6:45 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 3.1 miles. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the epicenter was 17 miles from Avenal, Calif., 19 miles from Coalinga, Calif., 22 miles from Paso Robles, Calif., and 196 miles from Sacramento. In the last 10 days, there have been no earthquakes of magnitude 3 or greater centered nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times
A shallow magnitude 4.6 earthquake was reported Tuesday evening 152 miles from Avalon, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor off Santa Catalina Island occurred at 6:24 p.m. Pacific time. The depth was recorded at 8.1 miles. ALSO: Disney 'very forthright' on cutting Boy Scouts funding over gay policy O.C. gets more than 1,000 concealed gun applications in just weeks Jimmy Kimmel pits Toronto Mayor Rob Ford against L.A.'s Eric Garcetti  
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Yellowstone National Park quivered early Sunday when the area's strongest earthquake in 34 years struck northwestern Wyoming, but no damage was reported. The epicenter of the magnitude 4.8 quake, which occurred at 6:34 a.m., was four miles north-northeast of Norris Geyser Basin, according to University of Utah Seismograph Stations. Seismic activity at Yellowstone isn't unusual, geologically speaking. The rugged land in the park, which boasts the world's largest collection of geysers, was formed by millions of years of volcanic activity.
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