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Earthquakes Northern California

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NEWS
October 18, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Traveling under San Francisco Bay proved to be safer than over it during Tuesday's earthquake. Riders made it safely through BART's four-mile long underwater tunnel linking San Francisco and Oakland. But there were harrowing moments for passengers all along the 71.5-mile Bay Area Rapid Transit system. James Herron Zamora was a passenger on an above-ground BART station in Oakland when the quake hit. "Our train bounced in the air off the tracks and landed again," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Shelby Grad
A magnitude 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Eureka in Northern California on Sunday night was felt as long and slow by residents from San Francisco to southern Oregon. Eureka police have told several Northern California media outlets that the department has no immediate reports of injuries or major damage. The Humboldt County Sheriff's Department also said it had no reports of injuries. "This lasted longer than any earthquake I've ever felt," Raquel Maytorena, 52, who lives about a mile from the coast in Ferndale near Eureka, told The Times.
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NEWS
November 20, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buck Alvin Helm, the gritty longshoreman who had become the symbol of survival from the massive Oct. 17 Bay Area earthquake, died unexpectedly Saturday without being able to publicly tell his amazing story. A funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon in his home of Weaverville. Helm, 58, died at 7:30 p.m. Saturday of "respiratory failure" after his condition abruptly worsened, a spokesman for Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Sunday's magnitude 6.9 earthquake occurred close to the Mendocino Triple Junction, located in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Cape Mendocino, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist David Oppenhiemer.   The site of many earthquakes, it  is the northern terminus of the San Andreas fault and the southern end of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, capable of producing a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that can hit Japan. Sunday's earthquake occurred west of the triple junction on the Gorda plate, which is being hit by the northern advance of the Pacific plate as it moves toward Alaska.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Olga Kolbek may be the only person in the world who wasn't surprised when a major earthquake ripped through the Santa Cruz Mountains on Oct. 17, 1989. She is convinced that the Old Faithful Geyser near the Napa Valley community of Calistoga had predicted the Loma Prieta earthquake that devastated parts of the San Francisco Bay Area, just as it had at least two other major temblors in the past 16 years.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People go about their business. But for almost everyone who lived through the biggest earthquake in California since 1906, life remains different a year after. The differences can be subtle. People may jump when a truck rolls by, or when the washing machine spins and shakes the house. Many people need more time to gain their composure when a small temblor rumbles through. Some people still won't cross the Bay Bridge. Some people have moved away.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 5, 1929, a crowd of 10,000 people gathered in downtown Oakland for the long-awaited opening of the H. C. Capwell department store in a massive, brick-fronted building adorned with terra cotta and hailed as a gem of Beaux Arts design. Today, the six-floor store, renamed the Emporium a year ago but still Capwell to many longtime Oaklanders, will reopen after almost 10 months of massive restoration to repair damage from last October's Bay Area earthquake.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Tuesday about 5 p.m. KNX-AM reporter Tom Vacar was on the phone with a friend in San Francisco. A few minutes into the conversation, a massive earthquake struck Northern California, and KNX (1070) put Vacar's friend on the air and became the first local radio station to broadcast the news. A short while later, CALNET--the statewide news service for public radio stations headquartered at KLON-FM (88.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cheers broke the gloom along the tomb of rubble that was the Nimitz Freeway when a surprise earthquake survivor--uncovered by a fluke shifting of debris--was carried to safety Saturday after being pinned in a buried air bubble for four chilly Bay Area nights. Laboring fast in a cool rain, workers freed Buck Helm, 57, from his Chevrolet Sprint more than five hours after his waving hand was seen by a rescue worker about 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A magnitude 5.7 earthquake struck Northern California on Thursday night and was felt across a large area, according to officials. The quake was occurred around 8:47 p.m., and its epicenter was 27 miles southwest of Susanville and seven miles west northwest of Greenville, about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento, and zero feet deep, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. A Chico resident told The Times that he felt a slow steady roll that lasted about 30 seconds. People on Twitter reported feeling the quake in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A minor earthquake rattled the area around Mono Lake on Saturday, but apparently caused no damages or injuries. The magnitude 3.9 earthquake was centered near the Nevada border. Lee Vining is 183 miles east of San Francisco and 268 miles north of Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | Associated Press
A small earthquake rattled the eastern Sierra Nevada on Saturday evening. The 3.5-magnitude quake struck at 6:25 p.m. about 7 miles southeast of Coso Junction, which is a sparsely populated area flanked by the China Lake Naval Weapons Center and Sequoia National Forest. The Inyo County Sheriff's Department did not have any reports of damage or injury. The small community of Coso Junction has few residents, only one small convenience store and a geothermal plant.
NEWS
February 12, 2001
A magnitude 4.0 earthquake struck the Monterey Bay area at 3:04 p.m. Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. It was the latest temblor in a seismically active weekend in California. The quake, centered eight miles southwest of Hollister, caused neither damage nor casualties. Early Sunday, there was a fifth noticeable aftershock of Saturday afternoon's moderate 5.1 quake centered four miles northwest of Big Bear Lake in Southern California's San Bernardino Mountains. This was a magnitude 3.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
A magnitude 4.0 earthquake struck an area off the coast of Northern California Wednesday, but caused no damage or casualties, the U.S. Geological Survey said. The 5:15 a.m. temblor was centered under the ocean 12 miles southwest of Ferndale.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The disaster relief fund set up by the state following the Loma Prieta earthquake won't come close to paying the recovery costs of the 1989 temblor, officials said Wednesday. The state auditor general said the 13-month quarter-cent sales tax increase approved by the Legislature following the 7.1 magnitude San Francisco-area quake raised $776 million for the fund. But auditor general's report to the Legislature said recovery costs will exceed the fund by $677 million.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A powerful earthquake rocked California's remote North Coast on Saturday, knocking brick facades off buildings, sparking fires that destroyed several businesses and two post offices, and sending at least 35 people to hospitals with cuts, broken bones and chest pains. The magnitude 6.9 quake began its long rumble through Humboldt County at 11:06 a.m. and was centered in a rural area about 35 miles south of Eureka, seismologists said.
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