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Earthquakes San Francisco

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | ALAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At precisely 8:33 Friday night, visiting conductor Gunther Herbig took the podium at Davies Symphony Hall here, raising his baton to begin Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G minor before what would ordinarily have been a disappointing crowd. Bunches of empty seats dotted the orchestra and balconies. Only about three quarters of the hall was filled. And for those people who did attend, the strictly musical result was unspectacular.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2007 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 4.2 earthquake awakened East Bay residents early Friday but caused little reported damage and no injuries, officials said. The temblor, which struck at 4:40 a.m., was centered in east Oakland, about half a mile east of the Hayward fault, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The shaking was felt as far away as San Francisco and Napa. "It's a run-of-the-mill little earthquake," said Chris Mills, a geologist with the Geological Survey. "It's a significant fault, but a small quake."
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NEWS
October 18, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Traveling under San Francisco Bay proved to be safer than over it during Tuesday's earthquake. Riders made it safely through BART's four-mile long underwater tunnel linking San Francisco and Oakland. But there were harrowing moments for passengers all along the 71.5-mile Bay Area Rapid Transit system. James Herron Zamora was a passenger on an above-ground BART station in Oakland when the quake hit. "Our train bounced in the air off the tracks and landed again," he said.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 10 years ago Sunday that the Loma Prieta earthquake unfolded live on national television, seen by millions of fans who tuned in to watch Game 3 of the World Series and saw the upper decks of Candlestick Park dip and sway when the quake hit. Neither the passing years nor the $6 billion spent on repairs has erased the memories or even all the physical devastation caused by the quake.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buck Alvin Helm, the gritty longshoreman who had become the symbol of survival from the massive Oct. 17 Bay Area earthquake, died unexpectedly Saturday without being able to publicly tell his amazing story. A funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon in his home of Weaverville. Helm, 58, died at 7:30 p.m. Saturday of "respiratory failure" after his condition abruptly worsened, a spokesman for Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland said Sunday.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People go about their business. But for almost everyone who lived through the biggest earthquake in California since 1906, life remains different a year after. The differences can be subtle. People may jump when a truck rolls by, or when the washing machine spins and shakes the house. Many people need more time to gain their composure when a small temblor rumbles through. Some people still won't cross the Bay Bridge. Some people have moved away.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | ROBERT A. JONES
The Cypress viaduct is one link in a spider web of freeways that cross west Oakland. Last week, if you had gone shopping in downtown Oakland and headed home to Berkeley, the thing that got you there was the Cypress viaduct, part of the Nimitz Freeway. You would never have been aware of that, of course. The viaduct was as invisible as the hard neighborhoods that sprawled underneath it. Now we all are aware of the Cypress.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The American Conservatory Theater has been homeless since 1989, when the Loma Prieta earthquake severely damaged its Beaux Arts Geary Theater. Oh, there have been plenty of temporary lodgings: The curtain rose at the barn-like Orpheum Theatre, for instance, and Hamlet played the Marina District, at the hard-to-find Palace of the Fine Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Tuesday about 5 p.m. KNX-AM reporter Tom Vacar was on the phone with a friend in San Francisco. A few minutes into the conversation, a massive earthquake struck Northern California, and KNX (1070) put Vacar's friend on the air and became the first local radio station to broadcast the news. A short while later, CALNET--the statewide news service for public radio stations headquartered at KLON-FM (88.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | JOYCE GEMPERLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Gemperlein is a freelance writer based in San Francisco
Cows didn't live in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1906, but about five days before the great earthquake that leveled the city, two were seen loping toward the bay. The sky, as the story goes, was brick-red, an omen of the fires that would finish off what the shaking ground hadn't. Mildred Fong's father told her about the cows, the ones somebody outside the ghetto that was Chinatown should have paid attention to.
NEWS
August 18, 1999 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 5.0 earthquake that struck on the San Andreas fault northwest of San Francisco on Tuesday evening was felt throughout the Bay Area, but police had no reports of damage or injuries. Street lights swung in San Francisco and some items dropped from shelves in the 6:06 p.m. quake. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey said the quake occurred at a depth of 4.3 miles.
NEWS
March 12, 1997
Four earthquakes in just 11 minutes shook San Francisco late Monday night. The U.S. Geological Survey reported the two strongest, both magnitude 3.6, were felt by residents in the city and from Marin County south to San Jose. Seismologists said the quakes were centered near the San Andreas fault offshore, nine miles southwest of San Francisco City Hall. The flurry of temblors, also including jolts of 2.4 and 2.3, began at 10:30 p.m. No injuries or significant damage was reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The American Conservatory Theater has been homeless since 1989, when the Loma Prieta earthquake severely damaged its Beaux Arts Geary Theater. Oh, there have been plenty of temporary lodgings: The curtain rose at the barn-like Orpheum Theatre, for instance, and Hamlet played the Marina District, at the hard-to-find Palace of the Fine Arts.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | Associated Press
The chance of a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area by 2020 has climbed to near certain, according to a scientist who warns that new faults were found after the devastating 1989 Loma Prieta quake. "A 90% likelihood is probably not unreasonable," David Schwartz, a seismologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, told a conference on earthquake hazards. Four years ago the agency forecast a 67% chance of a killer quake by 2020.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Farmers Insurance Group has paid a $100,000 fine to settle 8-month-old charges that it illegally failed to offer earthquake coverage to some people, the California Insurance Department announced Wednesday. The settlement follows an investigation that began after a consumer complained to the department that Farmers--the state's third-largest homeowners insurer--had failed to offer her quake insurance after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | BOB SECTER and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The swank Marina District of San Francisco is now a jumble of twisted pipes, concrete chunks, splintered roads, charred ruins and broken dreams. Fifty miles to the south, in the rugged Aptos Hills at the epicenter of Tuesday's powerful earthquake, the temblor did little more than knock apples off the trees. If nothing else, the disaster proved once again how fickle, how quirky, and how utterly devoid of class conscience or social status nature in its full fury can be.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cheers broke the gloom along the tomb of rubble that was the Nimitz Freeway when a surprise earthquake survivor--uncovered by a fluke shifting of debris--was carried to safety Saturday after being pinned in a buried air bubble for four chilly Bay Area nights. Laboring fast in a cool rain, workers freed Buck Helm, 57, from his Chevrolet Sprint more than five hours after his waving hand was seen by a rescue worker about 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
My father, then 6 years old, was asleep in his family's San Francisco home when that city was struck by the great earthquake of 1906. A china cabinet fell on his bed, but missed him. The family flat in the Mission District was damaged, and in a few hours fire began moving toward the neighborhood. My grandfather got his wagon and the family horse, Babe, and the Boyarskys, with a few possessions, headed toward the refugee encampment in Golden Gate Park.
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