Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEarthquakes Southern United States
IN THE NEWS

Earthquakes Southern United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | Associated Press
An earthquake with a magnitude of 4.6 rattled parts of Illinois, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky and Missouri late Friday, but no injuries or major damage were reported, officials said. "It was very slight," said Clint Simpson of the National Weather Service in Rosemont, Ill. The quake was centered in southeastern Missouri about 10 miles west of New Madrid, Mo., the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colo., reported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | Associated Press
An earthquake with a magnitude of 4.6 rattled parts of Illinois, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky and Missouri late Friday, but no injuries or major damage were reported, officials said. "It was very slight," said Clint Simpson of the National Weather Service in Rosemont, Ill. The quake was centered in southeastern Missouri about 10 miles west of New Madrid, Mo., the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colo., reported.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no one alive who remembers the last big earthquake here, it happened so long ago. For that very reason, residents don't get shaken up by talk of tremors, even though scientists have been warning for years that the heartland is due for a doozy. This monster quake, seismologists say, could be the worst natural disaster in American history. The losses could be staggering. Still, folks sitting right on top of the potentially deadly New Madrid Fault only yawned.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no one alive who remembers the last big earthquake here, it happened so long ago. For that very reason, residents don't get shaken up by talk of tremors, even though scientists have been warning for years that the heartland is due for a doozy. This monster quake, seismologists say, could be the worst natural disaster in American history. The losses could be staggering. Still, folks sitting right on top of the potentially deadly New Madrid Fault only yawned.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|