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Earthquakes Washington State

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Feb. 28 earthquake in Washington state demonstrated again to scientists just how the quake menace in the Northwest often differs from that in California. Six times since 1939, quakes ranging from magnitude 5.8 to 7.1 have shaken western Washington within 40 miles of last month's epicenter near the state capital of Olympia. Yet none of caused nearly the damage or deaths of several quakes during the same period in California.
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NEWS
December 16, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keri Yirak is skittish. Over the last six months, 91 earthquakes have struck below her old wood-frame house, rattling not only her nerves but also her finest china. She points to the skewed sconces, the broken picture frame and the cracks in her stucco walls. She keeps a flashlight and shoes next to her bed. She records the time and describes the motion of each trembler in a journal for scientists to review.
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NEWS
January 29, 1995 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp reminder that western Washington sits astride the seismically active Pacific Rim, an earthquake with a magnitude of 5.0 rumbled through the Seattle-Tacoma area Saturday night. Though no injuries or major damage were immediately reported, the quake, which hit at 7:11 p.m., was felt from Canada to central Oregon and as far east as Yakima, Wash. Seismologists at the University of Washington said it was the most significant earthquake to hit the area in 30 years, when a 6.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A rare series of earthquakes jolted the eastern Washington city of Spokane, breaking some dishes but causing no serious damage or injuries. That quake had a magnitude of 3.4 and was centered about two miles southwest of Spokane, said Waverly Person of the National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo. A second quake with a magnitude of 2.8 was reported about six miles northwest of the city about 8:01 a.m. A third quake with a magnitude of about 2.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
New evidence reinforces a growing concern that the Pacific Northwest is likely to be hit by an earthquake that will be far more powerful than the region is prepared for, scientists reported Wednesday. Teams of scientists from a wide range of institutions have collected evidence that indicates that major quakes killed giant trees along the Washington coast several hundred years ago and plunged some areas below sea level.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Seattle's second-biggest airport, badly damaged in last month's earthquake, was at full capacity again, about a month ahead of schedule, an official said. The King County Airport is widely used by cargo companies as well as by aerospace giant Boeing Co. to make aircraft deliveries. Airport officials reopened the full 10,000 feet of the long runway, which had operated with just 4,200 feet after the magnitude 6.8 quake Feb.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A series of moderate earthquakes shook the Pacific Northwest region, a day after a slightly stronger tremor. No injuries or damage were reported from any of the quakes, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Three tremors ranging from 3.0 to 4.2 in magnitude were reported during an 18-minute period, survey spokesman John Minsch said. Two rattled an area 140 miles northeast of Seattle, and the third hit 170 miles north of Seattle. They followed a quake of magnitude 4.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keri Yirak is skittish. Over the last six months, 91 earthquakes have struck below her old wood-frame house, rattling not only her nerves but also her finest china. She points to the skewed sconces, the broken picture frame and the cracks in her stucco walls. She keeps a flashlight and shoes next to her bed. She records the time and describes the motion of each trembler in a journal for scientists to review.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Earthquake damage to the state Capitol is more severe than initially thought, and inspectors have determined that the building is uninhabitable, officials said Saturday. Inspectors discovered that Wednesday's 6.8-magnitude quake shifted some of the massive columns that support one of the world's largest domes in the 1928 building, which survived two previous earthquakes.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2001 | Reuters
Boeing Co. said its narrow-body jet plant in Renton, Wash., was operating at 80% of capacity and that Wednesday's powerful earthquake would cause only minor financial pain. The Seattle-based aerospace giant said it would temporarily shift some operations from Renton to its underutilized facility in Everett, Wash., where it builds the wide-body 747, 767 and 777 models.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day a magnitude 6.8 earthquake hit, there were eight passenger jets on approach to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, two of them just above the runways. As far as air traffic controller Brian Schimpf could tell, the control tower was coming apart. Ceiling tiles were tumbling down on his head. Plate glass windows shattered. Radar monitors crashed to the floor. Schimpf dived for cover under a console and keyed his mike. "Attention all aircraft in Seattle," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Feb. 28 earthquake in Washington state demonstrated again to scientists just how the quake menace in the Northwest often differs from that in California. Six times since 1939, quakes ranging from magnitude 5.8 to 7.1 have shaken western Washington within 40 miles of last month's epicenter near the state capital of Olympia. Yet none of caused nearly the damage or deaths of several quakes during the same period in California.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Seattle's second-biggest airport, badly damaged in last month's earthquake, was at full capacity again, about a month ahead of schedule, an official said. The King County Airport is widely used by cargo companies as well as by aerospace giant Boeing Co. to make aircraft deliveries. Airport officials reopened the full 10,000 feet of the long runway, which had operated with just 4,200 feet after the magnitude 6.8 quake Feb.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Earthquake damage to the state Capitol is more severe than initially thought, and inspectors have determined that the building is uninhabitable, officials said Saturday. Inspectors discovered that Wednesday's 6.8-magnitude quake shifted some of the massive columns that support one of the world's largest domes in the 1928 building, which survived two previous earthquakes.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There may be worse jobs than being the mayor of this city. It's just hard to think of them at the moment. Only in Seattle, with its normally mellow streets, can a magnitude-6.8 earthquake look like a blessing in disguise.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2001 | Reuters
Boeing Co. said its narrow-body jet plant in Renton, Wash., was operating at 80% of capacity and that Wednesday's powerful earthquake would cause only minor financial pain. The Seattle-based aerospace giant said it would temporarily shift some operations from Renton to its underutilized facility in Everett, Wash., where it builds the wide-body 747, 767 and 777 models.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There may be worse jobs than being the mayor of this city. It's just hard to think of them at the moment. Only in Seattle, with its normally mellow streets, can a magnitude-6.8 earthquake look like a blessing in disguise.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Floods, fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, brutal winter storms--the Pacific Northwest has escaped the worst of nature's recent uprisings. But--ah, yes, there is a very big BUT in this story--only the most fatalistic here can sleep easily, amid growing evidence of great dangers lurking below, beyond and above.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much of the CBS drama "The Fugitive" is shot in Seattle and nearby towns, and Wednesday morning the production got a jolt--a 6.8-magnitude jolt, to be exact--as the Pacific Northwest was rattled by an earthquake that as of Thursday had caused an estimated 250 injuries, one death and billions of dollars in damages. Many said the toll could have been worse had the quake's epicenter not been buried in solid rock 30 miles beneath ground.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The temblor that hit the Seattle area Wednesday may cause more Californians to think about buying earthquake insurance, but the 6.8-magnitude shaker shouldn't otherwise affect policies or rates here, insurance officials said.
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