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FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1997 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the last 10 years, orca scientist Ken Balcomb has welcomed Earthwatch's volunteer corps to his Center for Whale Research here. Dozens of people eagerly pay $1,895 each to spend 10 days assisting Balcomb and his small staff as they gather killer-whale data in the idyllic San Juan Islands. It's just one of this year's offerings from Earthwatch, a Watertown, Mass.-based nonprofit program that links "needy" scientists with paying volunteers, says spokeswoman Blue Magruder.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1997 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the last 10 years, orca scientist Ken Balcomb has welcomed Earthwatch's volunteer corps to his Center for Whale Research here. Dozens of people eagerly pay $1,895 each to spend 10 days assisting Balcomb and his small staff as they gather killer-whale data in the idyllic San Juan Islands. It's just one of this year's offerings from Earthwatch, a Watertown, Mass.-based nonprofit program that links "needy" scientists with paying volunteers, says spokeswoman Blue Magruder.
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TRAVEL
October 16, 2005 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
COBRAS, scorpions, poisonous caterpillars, mosquitoes, soaring heat and humidity, incessant rainfall and mud. Chocola, an Indian village 80 miles west of the Guatemalan capital, is no one's idea of a garden spot. Why would anyone vacation here? Because it provides a chance to uncover an ancient civilization. Fifty-nine volunteers endured the inconveniences to search for buried Maya treasures last summer during an Earthwatch Institute program in the Guatemalan jungle.
TRAVEL
December 3, 2006 | Maggie Barnett, Times Staff Writer
HAVE a whale of a time on a nine-day sea expedition along the Baja coast sponsored by the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in San Pedro. The trip, which begins Feb. 25, is aboard the 113-foot Royal Polaris fishing boat. It will embark from San Diego, sailing to San Ignacio lagoon in southern Baja. "I tell people if you want a cruise, don't come on this trip," said Larry Fukuhara. "If you're looking for a little mint on your pillow, you're not going to get it.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2005 | Vani Rangachar, Times Staff Writer
Three weeks after the Dec. 26 earthquake and tsunami destroyed parts of southern Asia, I-to-I, which offers service-oriented vacations and programs in more than 20 countries, fielded about 1,000 calls in its Denver office from people wanting to volunteer in the disaster-stricken areas. Its office in Britain received 4,000 calls in one day, said Cheryl Friedman, marketing manager for I-to-I.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're a friend of 83-year-old Lillian Rachlin, you can count on getting amazing Hanukkah cards: Rachlin, scuba-diving in the Red Sea two years ago; cradling a baby orangutan on Borneo in 1986; standing like a little porcelain doll between two tall Somalians at a hospital in war-torn Mogadishu in 1991; and wrapped in the arms of the mayor of Dobczyce, Poland, who showed his appreciation for her work teaching English to local children in 1995 by whisking her off the ground.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2003 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
You can make a case that the solo traveler is discriminated against more than any other person on vacation. Just look at the costs: The dreaded single room supplement increases a single traveler's accommodations expenses by 50% to 100% over the amount charged per person to members of a couple traveling together. Yet the single traveler is a mighty force in the industry. Nearly one-quarter of all U.S. travelers, or 34.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | Edward Leventer, Special to The Times
If YOU THINK MOOSE have huge heads, try cutting one off. It didn't help that we'd left the ax and serrated knife behind. I had to saw away with a blade barely sharp enough for tomatoes. The truth is, I wasn't prepared for moose carving. I had come to Isle Royale National Park, floating off Michigan in the middle of Lake Superior, to study the interaction of wolves and moose. I expected they would be live ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
When school begins at Diamond Bar High School, students in the Advanced Placement environmental science class taught by David Hong may find themselves in the field studying the pattern of tracks made by the mule deer, the feeding habits of the horned lizard and the unique trill of the California quail.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006 | Rosie Dempsey, Special to The Times
SUSAN GARTNER and Marge Rachlin believe in investing in themselves, and as a result, they have accumulated a cornucopia of riches. Gartner, of Chevy Chase, Md., and Rachlin, of Washington, D.C., aren't sitting around counting money; instead, they're drawing on a treasury of memories from numerous trips that combine nature education with adventure.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Even the most intrepid travelers may be hunkering down now. But I warn you, the urge to go somewhere may come over you when you least expect it, as it did for Mary Bosanquet, a young Englishwoman who rode her bicycle across Canada as World War II was starting in Europe. "I was bucketing down the Bayswater Road [in London] in a number 17 bus," Bosanquet wrote in "Canada Ride" (Hodder & Stoughton, 1944). "... And then, like a stone falling in a pond, the idea dropped into my mind.
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