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WORLD
February 4, 2009 | Paul Richter
In another departure from her predecessor, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton plans to visit East Asia on her first trip in her new role. Clinton is expected to visit China, Japan and South Korea, and perhaps a country in Southeast Asia, according to a foreign diplomat knowledgeable about plans for the trip. The itinerary signals that Clinton intends to take a closer interest in East Asia than did Condoleezza Rice, her predecessor.
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NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Don Lee
As President Obama travels to Mexico on Wednesday to meet with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the one-day summit is expected to focus partly on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, an ambitious 12-nation trade pact being negotiated between North American and Asian countries. Here is a primer on the talks: Q: What is the Trans-Pacific Partnership? A: The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, is a free-trade pact being negotiated among 12 Pacific Rim countries.
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NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Don Lee
As President Obama travels to Mexico on Wednesday to meet with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the one-day summit is expected to focus partly on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, an ambitious 12-nation trade pact being negotiated between North American and Asian countries. Here is a primer on the talks: Q: What is the Trans-Pacific Partnership? A: The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, is a free-trade pact being negotiated among 12 Pacific Rim countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Where movie studios see trouble, Red Granite Pictures sees opportunities. The new finance and distribution company's business plan is both contrary and simple: Make the films the studios don't. Among its first projects are Martin Scorsese's “The Wolf of Wall Street,” which comes out Wednesday, and next year's “Dumb and Dumber To,” the intentionally misspelled sequel to the 1994 comedy. On the surface, those pictures don't exactly seem like the sort that a major studio would cast aside.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY
A 37-year-old law professor at UCLA has won a $50,000 grant to study East Asian attitudes on patents, trademarks and copyrights--an area of law known collectively as intellectual property--and how such attitudes affect U.S. businesses competing in world markets. The scholarly work is intended to provide down-to-earth guidance on transacting day-to-day business, but it isn't being paid for by a university or a nonprofit organization. Instead, the means for Professor William P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Chalmers Johnson, an influential scholar of East Asia's political economy whose seminal writings forced a reevaluation of both the Chinese Revolution and the Japanese "economic miracle," has died. He was 79. Johnson, who taught at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California from 1962 to 1992, died Saturday of complications of long-term rheumatoid arthritis at his home in Cardiff-by-the-Sea, said his wife, anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson. The UC Berkeley-educated Johnson was the founder and president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a 16-year-old nonprofit organization devoted to public education about Japan and its place in the world.
NEWS
August 12, 1985 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Gazing past the teeming refugee camps and across the Cambodian border toward the Vietnamese troops who have driven more than a quarter-million Cambodians into his country, the Thai Foreign Ministry official pondered the future. "Ten years . . . ," he said finally. "Within 10 years, we'll have a settlement--after all the old men in Hanoi are dead."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991
The next president of Pomona College will be Peter W. Stanley, an East Asian history expert who is now a high-ranking official at the Ford Foundation, the philanthropy that aids many universities and social programs. Stanley, 51, will take his new job in August, succeeding David Alexander, who has been president of the 1,400-student, liberal arts college in Claremont since 1969. Stanley's appointment was announced Friday by the college's Board of Trustees.
OPINION
February 4, 1996 | Robert A. Manning, Robert A. Manning, a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute, was a State Department olicy advisor from 1989-93
More and more, it seems like a deadly game of chicken: China threatens to attack Taiwan, which it considers a wayward province; Taiwanese politicians talk of independence, and in the midst of all this, a U.S. aircraft carrier task force, the USS Nimitz, steams through the Taiwan straits. Last week, Chinese Premier Li Peng underscored the mounting tensions in a speech on the "reunification of the motherland."
BUSINESS
June 1, 1995 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor's promise to slap nearly $6 billion in punitive tariffs on Japan's luxury car exports unless the country rapidly opens up its automotive markets has hardly been driving the Japanese to distraction. In fact, what's perceived here as America's trade belligerence is spurring some painfully polite conversations about what has been described as "the world's most important economic relationship."
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
With memories of the Soviet military's 1983 downing of a South Korean commercial airliner still seared in the minds of many, China's move to control the airspace over disputed islands has stirred fears of another disastrous miscalculation. Asia experts see little likelihood of an intentional attack on military or civilian aircraft in China's proclaimed Air Defense Identification Zone, or ADIZ, over the East China Sea, which overlaps Japanese and South Korean airspace claims. But the risk of accidental engagement in the zone traversed by hundreds of planes each day, the analysts say, has been greatly elevated by China's unilateral assertion of sovereignty and its demands that all entering aircraft file advance flight plans to Beijing.
WORLD
May 20, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - The Indian and Chinese premiers papered over their differences at a meeting in New Delhi on Monday, pledging to tackle a border dispute that has soured relations for decades and to work together for global stability. The meeting was heavier on style than substance, capped by nice-sounding words and a series of largely insignificant agreements on waste treatment, information sharing, sister cities and the translation of classical Chinese and Indian texts. As is often the case with China, however, the real action is in the shadows, analysts said.
WORLD
March 21, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The World Bank on Monday issued a report saying the damage from Japan's earthquake and tsunami could amount to as much as $235 billion and that limited effects from the disaster will be felt in economies across East Asia. Rebuilding in the aftermath of the destruction could take five years, according to the report, released Monday in Singapore. Growth in Japan's gross domestic product could be slowed by as much as half a percentage point this year, though it is likely to pick up after midyear once reconstruction efforts accelerate, the organization forecasted in its East Asia and Pacific Economic Update . World Bank economist Vikram Nehru said the economic fallout would certainly be felt around the region, given Japan's part in East Asia's economy, but that it would be "short-lived.
WORLD
January 13, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
China's recent test flight of a stealth fighter illustrated a worrisome "disconnect" between its military and civilian leaders, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday. The test of the J-20 fighter occurred Tuesday, while Gates was in Beijing. When he inquired about it at a meeting, Chinese President Hu Jintao seemed unaware it had occurred, Pentagon officials said. It was the latest in a series of incidents, including a 2007 anti-satellite missile test and a 2009 confrontation between Chinese vessels and a U.S. surveillance ship in the South China Sea, in which civilian leaders in Beijing appeared unaware or poorly informed about the activities of the armed forces, Gates said.
SCIENCE
December 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
After sequencing the DNA from a 30,000-year-old pinkie finger discovered in a Siberian cave, researchers have confirmed that it belonged to a previously unknown hominid species that probably diverged from the Neanderthal line about 350,000 years ago. The genetic sequence shares as much as 6% of its segments with modern-day Melanesians in the South Pacific, suggesting that the extinct species ? which has no formal name but whose members are being called Denisovans because the bone was found in the Denisova Cave ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Chalmers Johnson, an influential scholar of East Asia's political economy whose seminal writings forced a reevaluation of both the Chinese Revolution and the Japanese "economic miracle," has died. He was 79. Johnson, who taught at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California from 1962 to 1992, died Saturday of complications of long-term rheumatoid arthritis at his home in Cardiff-by-the-Sea, said his wife, anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson. The UC Berkeley-educated Johnson was the founder and president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a 16-year-old nonprofit organization devoted to public education about Japan and its place in the world.
WORLD
May 24, 2006 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
A Pentagon report on Chinese military modernization issued Tuesday reveals growing American concern over China's ability not only to threaten Taiwan, but also to throw its power around throughout East Asia and confront other U.S. allies. This year's edition of the annual report highlights apprehension among U.S. military officials that China is gearing up to confront Japan, and demands an explanation for Beijing's naval, air and missile buildup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | JOSHUA GORDON, Joshua Gordon works for Freedom House, a New York-based human rights group
While debate has raged in this country over Washington's abortive attempts to regulate "indecent" material on the Internet, even more far-reaching efforts by East Asian governments to censor opposing political views in cyberspace are quietly beginning to take hold. This month, the Singapore Broadcasting Authority took steps to ban "subversive" Internet content that might "incite disaffection against the government."
OPINION
October 24, 2010 | By Robert D. Kaplan
Islam has been an American obsession for at least a decade. The 9/11 attacks and the intractable violence in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan ? however much we have been the cause of it ? have left us bewildered and terrified by this seemingly austere and martial faith. Islam was spread quickly by the sword from Arabia westward across North Africa, the history books tell us, and is supposedly prone to the extremities of thought to which deserts give rise. But there is a whole other side to Islamic history that has been obscured, even as it illuminates a key strategic geography of the 21st century.
OPINION
September 26, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Now that China has become a global economic power, it's beginning to throw its weight around Asia as a military power as well. That's making China's neighbors — and the United States — nervous. And for good reason. China and its neighbors disagree over who owns hundreds of islands in East Asia's seas – and, more important, vast offshore areas around those islands that could yield oil, gas or minerals. In the South China Sea, parts of whose waters are claimed by many nations, a Chinese-built submersible set a record last summer by diving more than two miles to survey the seabed and to plant a Chinese flag on the bottom.
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