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BUSINESS
October 21, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whose destiny is it to lead the Pacific into the 21st Century? Pundits are asking that question with increasing frequency, wringing their hands over the decline of Pax Americana, fretting about Japan's dream of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere and postulating about how the two great Pacific powers might balance their interests in a lasting partnership.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whose destiny is it to lead the Pacific into the 21st Century? Pundits are asking that question with increasing frequency, wringing their hands over the decline of Pax Americana, fretting about Japan's dream of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere and postulating about how the two great Pacific powers might balance their interests in a lasting partnership.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993
It's often noted that it takes two to tango. But with Japan and the United States it's more often the case that the two only tangle. Perhaps Secretary of State Warren Christopher's current trip to Asia--less than a month after accompanying President Clinton on his first presidential trip to that region--can help take some of the harsh edge off one of the world's more troubled bilateral alliances. During Christopher's meetings next week with the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1991 | DAVID ARASE, David Arase is an assistant professor of government at Pomona College. and
Today's Bush-Kaifu summit will have to deal with the fact that bilateral discussions are widening in scope while U.S. and Japanese interests seem to be growing apart. This means that Japan is fast becoming a paramount policy problem. Five issues likely to be on the agenda help make this point. -- Japanese authorities last month got U.S. rice growers to remove their product from display at a U.S. trade show in Japan by threatening to arrest them. This incident unequivocally says "no" to U.S.
OPINION
November 24, 1991
JAPAN "When compared with Europe, Asia continues to be something like 'broccoli' for a large number of Americans. Though aware of its rich nutritional value, many shy away from even tasting the vegetable." --Mainichi Shimbun editorial on President Bush's decision to postpone his trip to Asia "Japan is not a country where foreigners can live comfortably in society." --Daily Yomiuri on rising crime by foreigners "Lukewarm might be the most pleasant state. . . .
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of six Southeast Asian nations began two days of talks Friday to consider setting up an 18-nation regional security forum and to attempt a joint response to President Clinton's call for a meeting of Pacific leaders in the autumn. Regional security topped the meeting agenda of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations--Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, Indonesia and the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1992 | JOSEPH S. NYE JR., Joseph S. Nye Jr. is the director of the Center for International Affairs at Harvard University. This is drawn from his recent article in Foreign Policy. and
Americans are worried about Japan. During the Cold War, the United States viewed Japan's role in the world through a Soviet lens. Today, an insecure Japan could lead to an arms race in East Asia, and a U.S.-Japanese trade war could destroy the multilateral system. President Clinton will need a new strategic vision for dealing with Japan. What role should the United States want Japan to play by the end of this century? Japan has four main options.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle called it "counterproductive." Japan was "cool and impassive." But a proposal for Asian countries to create a trade bloc that could hold its own against North America and a united Europe seems to be catching on in Southeast Asia.
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev writes frequently on Soviet and East European affairs
President Boris N. Yeltsin's recently announced economic plan of free prices, budget-cutting, privatization and private property represents a turning point in Russian history. In the words of a Moscow wiseacre, " Perestroika is dead, long live perestroika. " This emerging era of Russian capitalism also may hold tremendous economic opportunities for the United States. U.S. policy vis-a-vis the Kremlin has been anything but a smashing success during the last five years.
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