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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990
Playboy magazine was unfairly maligned in Cal Thomas's column on American exports to Eastern Europe (Op-Ed Page, Jan. 3). He laments the introduction of Playboy into Hungary and criticized the magazine for placing an advertisement celebrating the new freedom in the Eastern Bloc. If Thomas had his way, the yoke of communism would be replaced by the yoke of puritanism. But he's missing the point of the dramatic events of recent months. The people of Poland, Hungary, Romania and East Germany risked their lives for the right to be free from domination and censorship by any ruling class.
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WORLD
March 9, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Polish President Lech Kaczynski said he believes that the U.S. will honor its agreement to build a missile defense base in his country, adding that scrapping the project to improve ties with Russia would be an unfriendly gesture toward Poland. President Obama has acknowledged that he sent a letter to Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev that said curtailing Iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons would lessen the need for a U.S. missile defense system in East Europe, a project Moscow sharply opposes.
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NEWS
July 10, 1988 | WILLIAM ECHIKSON, Christian Science Monitor
Kati Fabian wouldn't listen. When the 22-year-old Budapest University student decided in May to join a new independent Hungarian students union, her parents warned her that it might jeopardize her career. Dinner time turned into shouting matches. "My parents plead with me, 'Don't go, don't go, it's dangerous,' " Fabian said. "I answer, 'Why? What do I have to lose?' " An explosive generation gap is destabilizing Eastern Europe.
WORLD
March 8, 2009 | Paul Richter
If anyone doubted that the "restart" button has been pushed on U.S. diplomacy, look no further than the T-shirt worn by a young gay rights advocate at a question-and-answer session in Belgium last week: "I [Heart] Hillary." "I must call on this young man," the new secretary of State said.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | Associated Press
Britain's Prince Charles today praised East Europeans for casting off communism but warned that the region faces an "ecological Armageddon." Speaking in the shadow of a statue of Karl Marx at a Budapest university that until recently bore the name of the father of communism, Charles was strident in his condemnation of Stalinism.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | From Reuters
Former President Ronald Reagan, in his first overseas speech since leaving office, said Tuesday that a tide of democracy is surging through the Communist world and bringing the collapse of totalitarianism nearer. Reagan said that events in China and Eastern Europe have planted irrepressible "seeds of democracy." Speaking in the medieval Guildhall, historic heart of London's financial district, the 78-year-old former President said the bloody suppression of popular unrest in China could not destroy the democratic yearnings of its people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter is director of European studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
The anointing of a Solidarity-led government in Poland is by no means the beginning of the end of Soviet power in Eastern Europe; indeed, a difficult and potentially dangerous period lies ahead. Following a host of mostly pleasant surprises from Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, it is tempting to see human progress as inevitable in rejecting four decades of rigid communist domination of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
The president of the World Jewish Congress said Monday that economic hardship in Eastern Europe is causing a rise in anti-Semitism. At a news conference in West Berlin, where the group is holding its first meeting on German soil, President Edgar M. Bronfman said the countries of Eastern Europe are trying to introduce democratic change at a time of economic difficulties and that Jews once again face being singled out for attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | CHARLES GATI, Charles Gati is a professor of political science at Union College and a senior research scholar at Columbia University's Research Institute on International Change. This is adapted from an article in the America and the World 1988/89 issue of Foreign Affairs.
Today the winds of change blow from the Soviet Union to Eastern Europe and not the other way around--and most East European regimes, making use of their newly granted if still limited autonomy, are dissociating themselves from Mikhail Gorbachev's policies of reform. Most are, in fact, united against almost everything he stands for, and they are unwilling to follow his example.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared Tuesday that Japan should play an economic and political role in East Europe. Kaifu, referring to a $1-billion Japanese aid program for Poland and Hungary, told a meeting at the German-Japanese Center, "We are ready positively to support the democratization of Eastern Europe and help them bring about a new order."
NEWS
November 13, 2005 | William J. Kole, Associated Press Writer
Instead of iron cots and squalor, there are plush toys and pillows in primary colors. Walls once decorated with photos of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu are now plastered with posters of pop star Kylie Minogue. But the government facility still serves a purpose born of the communist era: It's a repository for the unwanted: mentally disabled children whose parents are too poor, too unwilling or too ashamed to care for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000
John Campbell, 88, State Department and Council on Foreign Relations expert on the Middle East and Eastern Europe. Campbell was a consultant and advisor to the State Department from 1963 to 1980 and a member of its policy planning council in 1967, during the Arab-Israeli war, and in 1968. He also served on an advisory panel for the State Department's Bureau of Near East and South Asian Affairs during the 1960s.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Asian economic crisis, by contributing to Russia's recent financial upheavals, has now hit Eastern Europe. While Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic have only modest trade ties to East Asia, they are guilty by association as emerging markets. And the Russian crisis threatens to cut directly into these countries' exports. Economic growth remains fairly robust in Poland and Hungary.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1998 | RUSS WILES
It has been a year since the Asian economic crisis broke, and most nations in that region are still hurting. Yet developing countries in other parts of the world aren't faring nearly as bad and may even be learning from Asia's mistakes. Managers of mutual funds that focus on emerging economies say they're still finding plenty of stocks to buy.
NEWS
July 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Deadly rain that has swollen rivers and swallowed people and villages whole in the past two weeks is still falling in southern Poland and the neighboring Czech Republic, and the devastation spread to Germany on Friday as streets and cellars in towns on the Polish border were flooded. The storms have killed at least 86 people in 10 days and have devastated agriculture and manufacturing in Poland and the Czech Republic. Forecasters predicted that the rains will continue through the weekend.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | ANDRZEJ STYLINSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Furniture from the Forte SA factory looks attractive by any standard: design, craftsmanship, price. The shelves, cabinets and desks for home and office have found a ready market in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and other Western European countries, evidence of the growing popularity of Polish furniture abroad. Similar export successes are occurring across Eastern Europe, where market-driven competition was thrust on locals after communist central planning collapsed in the early 1990s.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What makes a 64-year-old disabled pensioner take her last $1,000 and invest it in a risky venture promising unrealistically huge returns? What makes a retired kindergarten teacher and her out-of-work husband sell their home of more than 20 years and place the proceeds in four pyramid schemes? "A kind of societal fever took hold here," says World Bank representative Carlos Elbirt. "People who you never imagined would trust these types of schemes were trusting these types of schemes."
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | From Associated Press
Eastern countries have been hardest hit by the wave of cold and snow gripping Europe, where the death toll rose Monday to more than 100 people, most of them homeless or elderly. European weather officials are calling the frigid temperatures the coldest in a decade. Heavy snows across the region have stranded motorists, closed air- and seaports, delayed bus and rail traffic and led to many accidents.
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