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April 29, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since November, when the Berlin Wall fell, it has been expected that the dominance of East German sports would also crumble. But few could have expected it this soon. If there can be such a thing as a rout in gymnastics, it happened Saturday. The United States women beat the East Germans by five points in a exhibition dual meet. The United States scored 192.75 points to 187.588 for the East Germans. The American score wasn't particularly high, but still solid.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2002 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Manfred Ewald, who as head of the state sports program in the former East Germany oversaw one of the most despicable, large-scale doping experiments ever conducted in the name of Olympic glory and national pride, has died. He was 76. Ewald, a former Nazi who after World War II served the Communist regime in East Germany at its highest levels, died Monday of complications of pneumonia in his hometown, Damsdorf, southeast of Berlin.
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SPORTS
September 7, 1991 | MARC FISHER, WASHINGTON POST
According to confidential government documents, East Germany fed steroids to virtually all of its Olympic track and field stars throughout the 1980s, a time when it dominated many events. The list of East German athletes enrolled in a long-term, state-sponsored steroids program includes seven Olympic gold medalists and several athletes still active for the reunited Germany, the documents say.
SPORTS
April 22, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The figurative dust was blown off record books for closer examination when Marion Jones decided to go after an obscure record, in the 300 meters, at the Mt. San Antonio College Relays today in Walnut. Determining the record-holder is not as easy as it sounds because the event is run so seldom officially. Track & Field News editors and other experts recognize East German Marita Koch's 34.1 seconds--a hand-held split time from her world record 400 (47.60), set in 1985 at Canberra, Australia.
SPORTS
April 28, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When East German gymnasts were told they were going to the United States, they said they envisioned skyscrapers. Instead, they got the suburbs of Memphis. Nevertheless, the fact that the East German gymnasts are here for the first time in 11 years, for a dual meet against the United States, signifies the political changes taking place in their country. This meet--the women compete today and the men Sunday--may be among the last times East Germany will compete internationally under its own flag.
SPORTS
February 18, 1991 | Agence France-Presse
Six former East German Olympic champions, including shotputters Udo Beyer and Ulf Timmermann and discus thrower Jurgen Schult, used anabolic steroids during the mid-1980s, according to Der Spiegel magazine. The allegations are based on a book being published later this year by former East German discus champion Brigitte Berendonk. Timmermann and Schult, both '88 Olympic winners, and Beyer, the '76 champion, took a steroid called Oral-Turinabol, Der Spiegel claims.
SPORTS
July 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Two East Germans who were prominent in international sports before they defected to the West have provided accounts of life as athletes on the other side of the wall. For those who have suspected East Germany of creating Wunderkinder through manipulation, intimidation and chemicals, the resulting picture was as grotesque as they could possibly have imagined.
SPORTS
August 30, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
During a recent tour by sports journalists through East Germany's so-called miracle machine, the hosts protested so often that they have no secrets that one couldn't help but wonder what they were hiding. The journalists' skepticism was no more noticeable than, say, the wall that runs between East and West Berlin, but the East Germans seemed not at all offended by it. On the contrary, they were amused. One of those who had fun at the journalists' expense was Dr.
SPORTS
December 4, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
Suspicions that East Germany emerged in the 1970s as a world sports superpower with chemical help have been confirmed through a story Monday in a Berlin newspaper by swimmer Raik Hannemann and through reports by Germany's Stern magazine last week. "We all took them (anabolic steroids)," wrote Hannemann, a silver medalist in the 200-meter medley at the 1989 European Championships, in a new publication, Berliner Kurier am Abend.
SPORTS
November 14, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although West Germany has more than twice as much land and almost three times as many people, it has won fewer than half as many Olympic medals as East Germany since they began competing as separate nations in 1968. The disparity does not have to be explained, particularly not to West Germans. But last year, as East Germany's political leader, Erich Honecker felt compelled to do so, anyway.
SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after the Berlin Wall collapsed in late 1989, Klaus Schoenberger had a dream. Schoenberger, an East German 400-meter hurdler in the 1970s and now director of the Berliner Turn-und Sportclub in the eastern part of the capital, envisioned a powerful all-German Olympic team. "I thought, if you took the East German development system and combined it with West German management techniques and the newest Western equipment, the result would produce a rocket that nobody could hold," he said.
SPORTS
July 11, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divided again. As Astrid Strauss stood on the blocks at the German Olympic swimming trials in Munich seven weeks ago, her former East German compatriots cheered her. But they were drowned out by the boos of former West Germans, including one who held up a banner that read: "No doping champion! Cheater go away!" The divisive issue? Performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
December 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
East Germany dominated women's international swimming with the help of steroids, according to a New York Times report. Twenty former East German coaches said that steroids were in widespread use in their country from the late 1960s to the late 1980s.
SPORTS
November 27, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lutz Dombrowski, the 1980 Olympic long jump champion, told a German newspaper that he had worked as an informer for the state security police of East Germany.
SPORTS
September 7, 1991 | MARC FISHER, WASHINGTON POST
According to confidential government documents, East Germany fed steroids to virtually all of its Olympic track and field stars throughout the 1980s, a time when it dominated many events. The list of East German athletes enrolled in a long-term, state-sponsored steroids program includes seven Olympic gold medalists and several athletes still active for the reunited Germany, the documents say.
MAGAZINE
June 9, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, Tamara Jones is a Times correspondent in Bonn, Germany.
FEET POUNDING AGAINST THE TRACK, CHRISTINE Wachtel saw the finish line swim into view and felt the two Romanians close on her heels. She urged herself on, clenching her jaw in fierce determination. Just half a lap to go. The stands shook with the polyglot cheers of 85 nations as Wachtel flew across the white line, flinging her arms victoriously in the air. Pure rapture lit up her face. She had won. Again.
SPORTS
July 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
East German leader Erich Honecker was so infatuated with figure skater Katarina Witt that he made it plain to the government-sponsored newspapers that they could gain favor with him by publishing her picture as often as possible.
SPORTS
April 30, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Americans lost to the East Germans in a men's gymnastics meet here Sunday, but for U.S. Gymnastics Federation officials, not all was lost. They found a new star. Trent Dimas, a 19-year-old freshman at the University of Nebraska, wasn't even invited to this meet. His coach at Nebraska, Francis Allen, pulled some strings to get him in. Then Dimas, unranked and unexpectedly good, beat the 10th-ranked gymnast in the world, East German Sylvio Kroll, to win the all-around title.
SPORTS
April 16, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
Ted Williams lost most of five years of his athletic career (1943-45, 1952-53) in the service of his country. But they didn't torture him or make him stand in a cell full of cold water while they slipped platefuls of stale sausage and rancid white margarine on a steel tray under his door. Joe DiMaggio lost three years of his career in the service of his country.
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