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East Germany Courts

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September 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ninety-eight inmates at an East German jail went on a hunger strike in support of fellow convicts who have been protesting on the rooftops of several prisons since Wednesday. The inmates are demanding that the government declare a general amnesty Oct. 3, the date set for German unification, because they say many sentences handed down under the ousted Communist government were overly harsh and should be reviewed.
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NEWS
April 25, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four decades, East Germans lived with a legal system that expressed little more than the whim of the ruling Communist Party. Now, six months after embracing democracy in the form of German unification, they hardly have a system at all. Confused, uncertain eastern judges are struggling with an imported western German legal system that they barely understand. Prosecutors and defense attorneys often argue cases that they have hardly dealt with before, often in cramped, makeshift courtrooms.
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NEWS
April 25, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four decades, East Germans lived with a legal system that expressed little more than the whim of the ruling Communist Party. Now, six months after embracing democracy in the form of German unification, they hardly have a system at all. Confused, uncertain eastern judges are struggling with an imported western German legal system that they barely understand. Prosecutors and defense attorneys often argue cases that they have hardly dealt with before, often in cramped, makeshift courtrooms.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ninety-eight inmates at an East German jail went on a hunger strike in support of fellow convicts who have been protesting on the rooftops of several prisons since Wednesday. The inmates are demanding that the government declare a general amnesty Oct. 3, the date set for German unification, because they say many sentences handed down under the ousted Communist government were overly harsh and should be reviewed.
NEWS
February 4, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Koos Botha is a burly, bull-necked man who wears thick, wraparound mirrored sunglasses and a gruff demeanor. On his wall, he proudly displays a 1990 newspaper photo that shows him punching a local official in the face. But the former Conservative Party member of Parliament doesn't exhibit the far more disturbing pictures of his once private war to preserve apartheid and a white-ruled South Africa. It began at 2 a.m.
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