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East Germany Defense

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January 24, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
East Germany will cut its defense budget by 10% and reduce its armed forces by 10,000 troops in two years' time, East German leader Erich Honecker announced Monday. The purpose of the cuts, said Honecker, is to give East Germany's armed forces "an even more defensive character." The East German head of state's declaration, at a dinner for Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson in East Berlin, was the latest in a series of announcements of Warsaw Pact troop and armaments reductions.
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NEWS
March 8, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dealing a potentially serious blow to confidence in U.S.-Soviet arms pacts, East Germany acknowledged Wednesday that it has 24 previously undeclared Soviet-made missiles that were banned by the 1987 medium-range missile treaty. The East German government said that it will destroy the SS-23 missiles, which are capable of carrying nuclear warheads but apparently were equipped with conventional explosives or other non-nuclear devices. It said two launch platforms were destroyed last month.
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NEWS
March 8, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dealing a potentially serious blow to confidence in U.S.-Soviet arms pacts, East Germany acknowledged Wednesday that it has 24 previously undeclared Soviet-made missiles that were banned by the 1987 medium-range missile treaty. The East German government said that it will destroy the SS-23 missiles, which are capable of carrying nuclear warheads but apparently were equipped with conventional explosives or other non-nuclear devices. It said two launch platforms were destroyed last month.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
East Germany will cut its defense budget by 10% and reduce its armed forces by 10,000 troops in two years' time, East German leader Erich Honecker announced Monday. The purpose of the cuts, said Honecker, is to give East Germany's armed forces "an even more defensive character." The East German head of state's declaration, at a dinner for Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson in East Berlin, was the latest in a series of announcements of Warsaw Pact troop and armaments reductions.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hungary, attempting to meet its defense needs independently of Moscow for the first time in decades, wants to buy much of the arsenal of the former East Germany. Defense Ministry spokesman Gyoergy Keleti said the items his country wants include 360 T-72 tanks, 350 BPM infantry fighting vehicles, 50 million rounds of ammunition and 100,000 anti-tank guided missiles.
NEWS
July 24, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union has assured the United States that the ramming of a U.S. military vehicle by a Soviet army truck in East Germany was an accident and not an intentional provocation, a U.S. official said Tuesday. "There are indications that the incident may not have been intentional," Pentagon spokesman Fred Hoffman said. He made it clear that the indications came from discussions with the Soviets. He added, however, that the United States is "still looking into the matter." U.S.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Reuters
East Germany's defense minister said Thursday that tension is rising between impoverished Soviet troops based in the country and increasingly resentful local people. Never much loved by ordinary East Germans, Soviet troops now face the unrestrained resentment of people fed up with decades of noisy exercises, troop movements and low-flying military aircraft.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
After resisting for three years, the Soviet Union has formally apologized for the March, 1985, killing of U.S. Army Maj. Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. while he was on a legitimate surveillance mission in East Germany, Defense Department officials said Tuesday. Soviet Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov made the apology in a private talk with Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci during the Moscow summit meeting two weeks ago, a Pentagon spokesman announced.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking further savings from the declining Soviet threat, Democratic House and Senate leaders said Sunday that U.S. troop levels in Central Europe should be cut to about 100,000 within a few years, or roughly half the level proposed last week by President Bush. But the suggestion by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) drew immediate fire from President Bush's chief of staff, John H.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | DRUSILLA MENAKER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Poland is awash in would-be benefactors. Executives, ambassadors, governors, heads of state, celebrities--the parade of visitors trailing their good intentions through the country's wrecked economy is endless. The goodwill visits have become tiring, but Poland must try to cash in on the bonanza before the angels from the West turn to another fashionable cause. For every planeload of visitors, ranking government members must clear schedules and prepare briefings.
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