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East Germany Foreign Aid West Germany

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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German Prime Minister Hans Modrow, his feelings hurt and his plea for financial aid rejected, left Bonn on Wednesday promising that his lame-duck government will press for economic reform before the national elections scheduled for next month. Modrow, who had conferred Tuesday with Chancellor Helmut Kohl and other West German officials, met with West German businessmen and industrialists Wednesday before returning to East Berlin.
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NEWS
April 1, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a development likely to alter the balance of economic power in Europe and beyond for the foreseeable future, East and West Germans have started the enormous task of unifying their economies. The initial, unofficial cost estimates are staggering. While neither the East nor West German governments have made official projections, some of West Germany's most respected economists have suggested the final price tag for unification could easily top 1 trillion deutschemarks (more than $600 billion).
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NEWS
January 19, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The West German government Thursday called on East Germany to make an explicit commitment to eventual German reunification in exchange for economic support. It was the baldest statement on the subject yet by West Germany, and it came only a day after Chancellor Helmut Kohl had reassured his allies in Paris that reunification would not affect Bonn's role in the Atlantic Alliance.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of East Germany's first free election, West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher called Saturday for an ambitious "Marshall Plan" to aid the formerly Communist part of Germany. Genscher said the prosperous West Germans must now contribute to building up the dilapidated East German economy just as the United States aided West Germany and Western Europe in the immediate postwar years, assuring the remarkable recovery.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reformist Prime Minister Hans Modrow loosened the Communist Party's grip on the East German government Thursday by choosing nearly half of his new Cabinet from four smaller political parties. Reports from East Berlin said 11 of the 27 posts went to the four minor parties--the Christian Democrats, the Liberal Democrats, the National Democrats and the Farmers' Party. Until recently, these parties, with a total membership numbering only a fraction of the ruling Communist Party's 2.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East and West German leaders agreed Tuesday to take steps toward monetary union and, eventually, reunification. Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany told reporters after meeting with East German Prime Minister Hans Modrow that a joint group of economic experts will meet next week to begin the process. They will try to devise a way to make the West German currency, the deutschemark, the common currency in the two countries.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German leader Egon Krenz and reformist Prime Minister Hans Modrow met Monday with a special West German emissary to discuss economic aid from Bonn as another major demonstration for reform was mounted in Leipzig. Rudolf Seiters, West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl's chief of staff, spent the day in East Berlin unveiling his government's offer, which is conditional on East German guarantees of free elections, multiple political parties and a free-market economy.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly elected East German prime minister, Hans Modrow, opened talks with non-Communist Party leaders Tuesday in an effort to form what he called a "genuine coalition government." He and Communist leader Egon Krenz conferred with the heads of four small parties that have suddenly displayed independence after years of serving as Communist Party satellites.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headlong rush toward German reunification has cleared two important hurdles, but serious, potentially volatile difficulties still loom ahead. Tuesday's accord in Ottawa on a formula for talks on German unity is a significant step even if it was anticipated.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of East Germany's first free election, West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher called Saturday for an ambitious "Marshall Plan" to aid the formerly Communist part of Germany. Genscher said the prosperous West Germans must now contribute to building up the dilapidated East German economy just as the United States aided West Germany and Western Europe in the immediate postwar years, assuring the remarkable recovery.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German Prime Minister Hans Modrow, his feelings hurt and his plea for financial aid rejected, left Bonn on Wednesday promising that his lame-duck government will press for economic reform before the national elections scheduled for next month. Modrow, who had conferred Tuesday with Chancellor Helmut Kohl and other West German officials, met with West German businessmen and industrialists Wednesday before returning to East Berlin.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headlong rush toward German reunification has cleared two important hurdles, but serious, potentially volatile difficulties still loom ahead. Tuesday's accord in Ottawa on a formula for talks on German unity is a significant step even if it was anticipated.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East and West German leaders agreed Tuesday to take steps toward monetary union and, eventually, reunification. Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany told reporters after meeting with East German Prime Minister Hans Modrow that a joint group of economic experts will meet next week to begin the process. They will try to devise a way to make the West German currency, the deutschemark, the common currency in the two countries.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The West German government Thursday called on East Germany to make an explicit commitment to eventual German reunification in exchange for economic support. It was the baldest statement on the subject yet by West Germany, and it came only a day after Chancellor Helmut Kohl had reassured his allies in Paris that reunification would not affect Bonn's role in the Atlantic Alliance.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German leader Egon Krenz and reformist Prime Minister Hans Modrow met Monday with a special West German emissary to discuss economic aid from Bonn as another major demonstration for reform was mounted in Leipzig. Rudolf Seiters, West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl's chief of staff, spent the day in East Berlin unveiling his government's offer, which is conditional on East German guarantees of free elections, multiple political parties and a free-market economy.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, a breached Berlin Wall. Tomorrow, a united Germany? The startling events in East Germany have raised anew the troubling German question: reunification of the democratic and Communist parts of the state. Here are some questions and answers on the implications: Question: Does the opening of the Berlin Wall mean reunification is nearer? Answer: Undoubtedly.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, a breached Berlin Wall. Tomorrow, a united Germany? The startling events in East Germany have raised anew the troubling German question: reunification of the democratic and Communist parts of the state. Here are some questions and answers on the implications: Question: Does the opening of the Berlin Wall mean reunification is nearer? Answer: Undoubtedly.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a development likely to alter the balance of economic power in Europe and beyond for the foreseeable future, East and West Germans have started the enormous task of unifying their economies. The initial, unofficial cost estimates are staggering. While neither the East nor West German governments have made official projections, some of West Germany's most respected economists have suggested the final price tag for unification could easily top 1 trillion deutschemarks (more than $600 billion).
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reformist Prime Minister Hans Modrow loosened the Communist Party's grip on the East German government Thursday by choosing nearly half of his new Cabinet from four smaller political parties. Reports from East Berlin said 11 of the 27 posts went to the four minor parties--the Christian Democrats, the Liberal Democrats, the National Democrats and the Farmers' Party. Until recently, these parties, with a total membership numbering only a fraction of the ruling Communist Party's 2.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly elected East German prime minister, Hans Modrow, opened talks with non-Communist Party leaders Tuesday in an effort to form what he called a "genuine coalition government." He and Communist leader Egon Krenz conferred with the heads of four small parties that have suddenly displayed independence after years of serving as Communist Party satellites.
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