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NEWS
September 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany is scrambling to prepare for an impending invasion from the East on a scale that North Atlantic Treaty Organization war games never dared to imagine. On Wednesday, the entire 90,000-strong East German Volksarmee will join forces with the West German Bundeswehr in a military merger of former foes.
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NEWS
November 9, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years after their artful diplomacy toppled the Berlin Wall, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, George Bush and Helmut Kohl gathered among the ghostly traces of the hated Cold War symbol Monday to take their bows and reflect on the hopes and fears of Nov. 9, 1989, when the world as they knew it changed overnight.
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NEWS
January 26, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are not worried about the prospect of a reunified Germany once again dominating Europe, but the notion scares people in Poland and concerns the British and French, according to a survey conducted jointly by The Times Poll and The Economist. In the abstract, Americans and the French overwhelmingly favor the idea of reuniting West Germany and East Germany nearly 45 years after the crushing defeat of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ilona Wolke misses East German ketchup. It may not have been the best, she admits, but she grew up on it and liked it. As with many things East German, Wolke's favorite ketchup disappeared amid the avalanche of change that accompanied German reunification, and she complains that the replacement products--all from the West--not only taste different but contain additives.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It did not end like cloak-and-dagger stories are supposed to, with briefcases exchanged on foggy bridges or midnight dashes across nameless borders. Instead, one of the most thrilling chapters in Cold War espionage closed with a German nursery rhyme sung by a lonely, drunken spy: "All my little duckies, swimming on the pond . . . heads deep in water, tails to the sky."
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | From Reuters
An East German military court sentenced a West German man to eight years in jail on Thursday for espionage, the official news agency ADN said. ADN said that Bernd Manthey was found guilty of military espionage against East Germany and "treasonable passing of information."
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When East German head of state Sabine Bergmann Pohl gathered ambassadors to her presidential quarters last week for a toast to German unity, the celebration was tinged with a note of apology. The envoys, all 74 of them, had been put out of a job by the very event they had been called together to cheer. Joining them in joblessness will be 2,000 East German diplomats, made redundant by the reunification taking effect today.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday hailed the opening of East Germany's borders as a "liberation," but he urged East Germans to resist the pull of the West and remain at home to reform their country. The announcement from East Berlin caught Bush Administration officials by surprise, sending shock waves through the White House and the government's foreign policy Establishment and leading some U.S. officials to worry that the changes that have rocked East Germany are coming too fast.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
West Germany's highest court on Saturday rejected the current rules for December's all-German elections, a move likely to split the left-wing vote and further strengthen Chancellor Helmut Kohl's chances of reelection. The decision by the Federal Constitutional Court appeared to throw a life preserver to small East German parties, which had played a key role in last fall's East German revolution but had seemed likely to face extinction in the unified German vote, scheduled for Dec. 2.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | United Press International
West Germany's Lufthansa airlines landed in West Berlin on Sunday for the first time since the end of World War II, picking up Soviet children who had spent their vacation in East Germany and returning them to the Soviet Union. The airline, which had not been allowed to fly into Berlin since 1945, needed special permission to land in the long-divided city from the victorious World War II Allies--France, Britain, the United States and Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Otto Fischer sits in his upstairs window and peers through his binoculars. There is not much to see. Ducklings paddle across the pond, a farmer tinkers with his tractor, a few workers spackle the memorial stretch of the concrete wall that once divided this village into East and West Germany. Gone are the armed guards who once would have arrested Fischer for waving to his neighbors or calling hello to the workers on the other side of the wall.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Once, we swore to the nation's unity despite its division; today, despite unity, we have to realize that the nation remains divided." --Egon Bahr Former West German Cabinet minister It took several months for the architects of German unity to grasp the extent of economic devastation left by four decades of communism in the east and the difficulties it presented in rebuilding a unified nation.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mood was sullen. About 200 souls had crammed into the stuffy lobby of the city's main savings bank waiting for money, and those near the back reckoned the teller's window was a full afternoon away. "Last week, it was two hours; today, who knows?" said Maria Herzog, a young mother of five, as she shifted her youngest from one hip to the other. Behind her, a middle-aged woman added bitterly: "I can afford the time now--my job is gone."
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Legislature on Monday ratified the treaty permitting German unification, formally ending the four World War II victors' authority. The other three--the United States, France and Britain--ratified the treaty last year. "It's been 45 years since the war ended. It's time to live normally," said Marshal Sergei Akhromeyev, former chief of the Soviet general staff and an adviser to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has suddenly found himself facing a serious domestic crisis with the alarming economic decline in eastern Germany--"far more difficult than we expected," his economic minister said Friday. Kohl has ordered a series of emergency meetings to deal with the crisis, and Economic Minister Juergen Moellemann earlier this week unveiled a 10-point program to head off a full-scale collapse of the region--until last October the communist state of East Germany.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | Times correspondents asked a variety of ordinary citizens in different countries about their hopes and fears for 1991. Their answers ranged from the blatantly political to the guardedly personal
Peter Koch, 58, married with two daughters, is a 36-year veteran of Berliner Druckerei, a printing company formerly owned and operated by the Communist Party. It has already shed 25% of its staff in a post-reunification streamlining. "I'm older, so I'm not as optimistic as the younger ones. It will take a few years for things to get better here, but by then, my time will be up. At 58, I also wouldn't have a chance in the west (of Germany).
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Four victors of World War II and the two halves of defeated Germany agreed here Tuesday to begin historic talks "shortly" to reunify Germany and to discuss the security concerns of neighboring states. After a frenetic day of bilateral talks among their foreign ministers, the six nations issued a brief statement that, however vague, begins a process that will finally lead to a peace settlement with Germany 45 years after the end of the war.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the cheers of thousands of onlookers, East German army units Monday began dismantling the first major section of the infamous Berlin Wall, a barrier that for nearly three decades symbolized a divided Europe. Using heavy mechanized equipment, the soldiers began to remove the top portions of the 13-foot-high concrete wall in front of the Brandenburg Gate. East German authorities said initial plans call for removing a 1.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It did not end like cloak-and-dagger stories are supposed to, with briefcases exchanged on foggy bridges or midnight dashes across nameless borders. Instead, one of the most thrilling chapters in Cold War espionage closed with a German nursery rhyme sung by a lonely, drunken spy: "All my little duckies, swimming on the pond . . . heads deep in water, tails to the sky."
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With flags flying and loudspeaker blaring, the bright little car trundled optimistically into this eastern German farming community--a one-vehicle caravan dispatched to spread the socialist message among those preparing to vote in Sunday's national elections. There was only one problem: the streets were empty.
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