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East Germany Health

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November 7, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sprawling Charity Hospital, hard by the Berlin Wall, is the showplace of East German medicine, and it is in serious trouble. Tens of thousands of young East Germans have fled to the West, and this has left the hospital short of doctors and, just as important, nurses. "We have problems," Dr. Siegbert Thomas, the administrative director, admitted in a guarded interview, "and we are very much involved in finding solutions."
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NEWS
November 7, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sprawling Charity Hospital, hard by the Berlin Wall, is the showplace of East German medicine, and it is in serious trouble. Tens of thousands of young East Germans have fled to the West, and this has left the hospital short of doctors and, just as important, nurses. "We have problems," Dr. Siegbert Thomas, the administrative director, admitted in a guarded interview, "and we are very much involved in finding solutions."
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NEWS
February 23, 1987 | From Reuters
East Germany will issue an anti-AIDS brochure and television film this year after the nation's first reported death from the disease, a senior health official said Sunday. Nils Soennichsen told a public meeting called to help to allay fears about aquired immune deficiency syndrome that the brochure and program will be available soon. Soennichsen announced last week that East Germany had registered its first AIDS death and 14 cases of infection.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | From Reuters
East Germany will issue an anti-AIDS brochure and television film this year after the nation's first reported death from the disease, a senior health official said Sunday. Nils Soennichsen told a public meeting called to help to allay fears about aquired immune deficiency syndrome that the brochure and program will be available soon. Soennichsen announced last week that East Germany had registered its first AIDS death and 14 cases of infection.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hevka Sramek was born in Czechoslovakia in 1936, that country's health care system was one of the best in Europe. Then came World War II and more than four decades of Communist control. Sramek took political refuge in the United States in 1964. She returned to her homeland for a visit in 1988. In those 24 years, Sramek said, the medical system had deteriorated badly. "Everything was ready to collapse," she said, recalling her visit.
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