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BUSINESS
September 30, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
At the beginning of the 18th Century, pharmacist Johann Friedrich Boettger, reputedly also an alchemist, was instructed by Augustus the Strong, king of Poland and elector of Saxony, to convert base metals into gold. Like others before him, Boettger failed, but he discovered something in the process: how to turn this region's pale clay into fine porcelain, of such quality that it quickly became known as "white gold."
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NEWS
January 10, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Come the greening of America, householders in cities like Los Angeles may be able to buy refrigerators that don't use Freon, one of a family of cooling compounds long standard in U.S. models that work their way into the atmosphere and damage Earth's protective ozone layer.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Privatization Nearly Complete in Former East Germany: After selling off nearly 40,000 inns, stores and other companies, the agency charged with privatizing East Germany's state sector said its task is nearly over. The Treuhandanstalt, or Trustee Agency, which once was reportedly the largest corporation in the world, said it has only 131 companies left to sell before it closes shop as scheduled at year's end. The agency took over ownership of state companies employing 4.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Privatization Nearly Complete in Former East Germany: After selling off nearly 40,000 inns, stores and other companies, the agency charged with privatizing East Germany's state sector said its task is nearly over. The Treuhandanstalt, or Trustee Agency, which once was reportedly the largest corporation in the world, said it has only 131 companies left to sell before it closes shop as scheduled at year's end. The agency took over ownership of state companies employing 4.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand East Germans applied for the first benefits their government has ever given the unemployed, whose ranks may swell dramatically as the nation moves toward capitalism. At the moment, East Germany has a severe labor shortage because skilled workers continue to leave for West Germany. But industrial production has slowed, and the nation is threatened with financial collapse.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an hour after official closing time for the town's only bank, yet 14 weary souls waited quietly in the cheap fluorescent glare as the lone teller labored on. In calmer times, everyone here would have long since been home, the bank's manager, Martina Bengsch, admitted, and she would occasionally see her infant daughter before she went to sleep. But for East Germany, these are not calm times.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German political parties and opposition groups Sunday proposed Dec. 7 as the date for an unprecedented round-table discussion on free elections. Wolfgang Ullmann, a spokesman for the opposition group Democracy Now, announced the proposal, saying the meeting would be attended by 31 delegates. The groups said they have not received a formal reply from the Communist-dominated government. The government last week proposed round-table talks but gave no start date.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The burghers in Weimar, the quiet city that recalls Germany's cultural glory and political shame, share the feelings of their countrymen. From the salt-sprayed Baltic coast and the spacious, lake-speckled farmlands of Mecklenburg to the depressed cities of Saxony and the rolling hills of Thuringia, East Germans are gingerly moving toward democracy--confused about the present, deeply unsure about the future.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely four months ago, the East Germans were basking in the glory of having carried off the first successful German revolution. It has been mostly downhill since. In all of East Europe, no one took communism more seriously than the East Germans, and no one has lost more as a result of its fall. Today, the caretaker government in East Berlin seems powerless, the economy has gone into a tailspin and key institutions such as the army, once the Warsaw Pact's finest, have simply come unstuck.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has suddenly found himself facing a serious domestic crisis with the alarming economic decline in eastern Germany--"far more difficult than we expected," his economic minister said Friday. Kohl has ordered a series of emergency meetings to deal with the crisis, and Economic Minister Juergen Moellemann earlier this week unveiled a 10-point program to head off a full-scale collapse of the region--until last October the communist state of East Germany.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has suddenly found himself facing a serious domestic crisis with the alarming economic decline in eastern Germany--"far more difficult than we expected," his economic minister said Friday. Kohl has ordered a series of emergency meetings to deal with the crisis, and Economic Minister Juergen Moellemann earlier this week unveiled a 10-point program to head off a full-scale collapse of the region--until last October the communist state of East Germany.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an hour after official closing time for the town's only bank, yet 14 weary souls waited quietly in the cheap fluorescent glare as the lone teller labored on. In calmer times, everyone here would have long since been home, the bank's manager, Martina Bengsch, admitted, and she would occasionally see her infant daughter before she went to sleep. But for East Germany, these are not calm times.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely four months ago, the East Germans were basking in the glory of having carried off the first successful German revolution. It has been mostly downhill since. In all of East Europe, no one took communism more seriously than the East Germans, and no one has lost more as a result of its fall. Today, the caretaker government in East Berlin seems powerless, the economy has gone into a tailspin and key institutions such as the army, once the Warsaw Pact's finest, have simply come unstuck.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand East Germans applied for the first benefits their government has ever given the unemployed, whose ranks may swell dramatically as the nation moves toward capitalism. At the moment, East Germany has a severe labor shortage because skilled workers continue to leave for West Germany. But industrial production has slowed, and the nation is threatened with financial collapse.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The burghers in Weimar, the quiet city that recalls Germany's cultural glory and political shame, share the feelings of their countrymen. From the salt-sprayed Baltic coast and the spacious, lake-speckled farmlands of Mecklenburg to the depressed cities of Saxony and the rolling hills of Thuringia, East Germans are gingerly moving toward democracy--confused about the present, deeply unsure about the future.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German political parties and opposition groups Sunday proposed Dec. 7 as the date for an unprecedented round-table discussion on free elections. Wolfgang Ullmann, a spokesman for the opposition group Democracy Now, announced the proposal, saying the meeting would be attended by 31 delegates. The groups said they have not received a formal reply from the Communist-dominated government. The government last week proposed round-table talks but gave no start date.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Come the greening of America, householders in cities like Los Angeles may be able to buy refrigerators that don't use Freon, one of a family of cooling compounds long standard in U.S. models that work their way into the atmosphere and damage Earth's protective ozone layer.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's third-largest personal computer maker, said it will build a new PC manufacturing plant in the Netherlands to take advantage of the country's excellent infrastructure and access to principal European markets. The company said the new facility will employ about 600 people. It didn't disclose the cost or location of the new plant. The Palo Alto-based company has a printer plant in Amersfoort, the Netherlands.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
At the beginning of the 18th Century, pharmacist Johann Friedrich Boettger, reputedly also an alchemist, was instructed by Augustus the Strong, king of Poland and elector of Saxony, to convert base metals into gold. Like others before him, Boettger failed, but he discovered something in the process: how to turn this region's pale clay into fine porcelain, of such quality that it quickly became known as "white gold."
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