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East Germany Trade

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NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
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NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
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NEWS
August 28, 1985 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl sharply criticized his counterintelligence agency Tuesday for allowing one of its senior officers, who defected to the East last week, to stay in office even though he was known to have a drinking problem. Kohl's criticism, at a Cabinet meeting, fueled speculation that a former head of counterintelligence, Heribert Hellenbroich, will be forced to resign his new post as chief of the federal intelligence agency. Hellenbroich took over the new assignment on Aug.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the day that Polish Solidarity leader Lech Walesa was greeted here by President Bush as a man who has "inspired the nation and the world in the cause of liberty," Democrats on Monday stepped up pressure on the White House to respond more decisively to the dramatic changes sweeping Eastern Europe. Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell called on Bush to visit West Berlin to personally acknowledge "the tremendous significance of the symbolic destruction of the Berlin Wall."
OPINION
July 15, 1990 | Robert Gerald Livingston, Robert Gerald Livingston directs the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University
It is easy to believe that a unified Germany will essentially be the Federal Republic writ large, the loyal North Atlantic Treaty Organization ally that, for the past 40 years, has been "Germany" for Americans. Each passing week, unification looks more and more as if West Germany is simply absorbing East Germany. Ministries in Bonn are already running the "German Democratic Republic."
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | ADAM TANNER, REUTERS
The ghost of Christmas past is boosting fortunes in this village in former East Germany. Known for high-quality wooden Christmas ornaments, toys and decorations, Seiffen has enjoyed a revival in the decade since German unification by doggedly preserving traditions. Wooden workshops, stores and inns line the main street along the bottom of a valley surrounded by hills in the Erzgebirge region near the Czech border.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conventional wisdom has it that the Germans may become so preoccupied reconstructing the eastern half of their soon-to-be-unified country that the powerful economic sway they have exercised in the rest of the old East Bloc could suffer. There are strong signs, however, that indicate otherwise. "We're beginning a time when it couldn't be better for us Germans," declared Heinrich Machowski, an Eastern Europe specialist at the German Institute for Economic Research here.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After only 10 days of negotiations, the two Germanys agreed Wednesday on terms of a currency union that will bring the much-valued West German deutschemark to East German wage earners, pensioners and small savers at a highly favorable 1-to-1 exchange rate. In most other areas, little-wanted East German ostmarks will be exchanged for deutschemarks at a rate of 2 to 1.
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