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East Germany Trade West Germany

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NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With bright Volkswagen and Audi flags fluttering outside, and a perimeter fence freshly painted baby blue, it's hard to miss Sven Erkner's auto repair garage amid Ruedersdorf's drab surroundings. As the head of one of a new network of VW dealerships planned for East Germany, Erkner, 28, says he knows the competition will be tough, but he's ready. "We've got an advantage over others because I've concentrated on VW and know the car," he said in an interview. "We've already got a lot of orders."
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NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With bright Volkswagen and Audi flags fluttering outside, and a perimeter fence freshly painted baby blue, it's hard to miss Sven Erkner's auto repair garage amid Ruedersdorf's drab surroundings. As the head of one of a new network of VW dealerships planned for East Germany, Erkner, 28, says he knows the competition will be tough, but he's ready. "We've got an advantage over others because I've concentrated on VW and know the car," he said in an interview. "We've already got a lot of orders."
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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany sent an unsettling signal to its partners in the European Community on Thursday by postponing an agreement with its closest Western neighbors while at the same time moving toward a closer new relationship with East Germany. The West German government announced that it was holding off on concluding what had been called a landmark treaty that would eliminate border controls with France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An East Berlin political conference warned Wednesday that a rising incidence of neo-Nazi acts in East Germany represents a "serious danger for the nation and democracy." The first "Round Table," bringing together various political parties and opposition groups to discuss democratic reforms and the run-up to the May elections, said East German authorities investigated 144 reports of neo-Nazi violence this year--three times the number in 1988.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German leaders have assured the West German government that free elections will be held within two years, a senior emissary from Bonn reported Tuesday. West German official Rudolf Seiters, after holding talks with East German leader Egon Krenz and Prime Minister Hans Modrow, said he was told that the elections could be held by the spring of 1991. Until a few weeks ago, such free elections would have been considered inconceivable in the former hard-line Communist state.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An East Berlin political conference warned Wednesday that a rising incidence of neo-Nazi acts in East Germany represents a "serious danger for the nation and democracy." The first "Round Table," bringing together various political parties and opposition groups to discuss democratic reforms and the run-up to the May elections, said East German authorities investigated 144 reports of neo-Nazi violence this year--three times the number in 1988.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does it mean for business that the Berlin Wall is down, figuratively speaking, and East Germans are free to travel to the West? There was not much doubt among German economic and financial analysts on Friday that the end of the Wall promises a great boon to the economy of West Germany and by extension to all of Europe and the United States. But there was also an awareness that freedom to travel did not mean reunification of Germany--the Soviet Union has ruled out a change of borders.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany sent an unsettling signal to its partners in the European Community on Thursday by postponing an agreement with its closest Western neighbors while at the same time moving toward a closer new relationship with East Germany. The West German government announced that it was holding off on concluding what had been called a landmark treaty that would eliminate border controls with France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German leaders have assured the West German government that free elections will be held within two years, a senior emissary from Bonn reported Tuesday. West German official Rudolf Seiters, after holding talks with East German leader Egon Krenz and Prime Minister Hans Modrow, said he was told that the elections could be held by the spring of 1991. Until a few weeks ago, such free elections would have been considered inconceivable in the former hard-line Communist state.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does it mean for business that the Berlin Wall is down, figuratively speaking, and East Germans are free to travel to the West? There was not much doubt among German economic and financial analysts on Friday that the end of the Wall promises a great boon to the economy of West Germany and by extension to all of Europe and the United States. But there was also an awareness that freedom to travel did not mean reunification of Germany--the Soviet Union has ruled out a change of borders.
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