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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT
Business brought Sunny Bhalla to the San Fernando Valley. But since he's been here, that business hasn't been booming. Bhalla, his wife and their three children left West Los Angeles six months ago, moving to an apartment above the Canoga Park restaurant they'd bought. But so far, their dream of success is still just a dream. "I thought business would have been better," Bhalla said, sitting at one of dozens of empty tables inside his peach-and-white restaurant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT
Business brought Sunny Bhalla to the San Fernando Valley. But since he's been here, that business hasn't been booming. Bhalla, his wife and their three children left West Los Angeles six months ago, moving to an apartment above the Canoga Park restaurant they'd bought. But so far, their dream of success is still just a dream. "I thought business would have been better," Bhalla said, sitting at one of dozens of empty tables inside his peach-and-white restaurant.
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NEWS
October 2, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
His forehead creased by concern, his fingers drumming on the desk top, Dinesh Lakhanpal picked up the telephone in his Granada Hills insurance office Friday and made a call he never dreamed he'd make. A world away in India, an earthquake had leveled much of his homeland the previous day.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
His forehead creased by concern, his fingers drumming on the desk top, Dinesh Lakhanpal picked up the telephone in his Granada Hills insurance office Friday and made a call he never dreamed he'd make. A world away in India, an earthquake had leveled much of his homeland the previous day.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
In Bombay Spices, a shop along Pioneer Boulevard in Artesia, the air is redolent with the scent of curry and sandalwood. Herbs, spices and other foodstuffs line the shelves, along with articles of traditional Indian dress and, as touted by a sign in the window, "knit sweaters, cardigans, tops and fancy shoes from England." The tiny shop also has more than 1,200 videotapes lining the wall behind the register.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
In Bombay Spices, a shop along Pioneer Boulevard in Artesia, the air is redolent with the scent of curry and sandalwood. Herbs, spices and other foodstuffs line the shelves, along with articles of traditional Indian dress and, as touted by a sign in the window, "knit sweaters, cardigans, tops and fancy shoes from England." The tiny shop also has more than 1,200 videotapes lining the wall behind the register.
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