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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
What is the Gold Line Eastside extension? It's the latest light-rail line in Los Angeles County, running six miles from downtown L.A. through Boyle Heights and into East Los Angeles. When it opens to the public on Sunday, the Gold Line will run from Pasadena to East L.A. The Eastside extension cost $898 million to build. Construction began in 2004. -- How many stations are there? There are eight stations along the extension's route: Atlantic, East L.A. Civic Center, Maravilla, Indiana, Soto, Mariachi Plaza, Pico/Aliso and Little Tokyo/Arts District.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2009 | Baxter Holmes
Martin Perez has two reasons to celebrate today. First, it's his 50th birthday, and, second, he plans to join the crowd of passengers expected to ride the new Gold Line Eastside extension for free on its first day of service. "My friend already called me, 'Hey, let's check it out to go downtown,' " said Perez, an Eastside resident who works for a demolition company. Los Angeles County's latest light-rail line, the $898-million Gold Line Eastside extension opens to the public today after being formally dedicated Saturday morning.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2009 | Baxter Holmes
Martin Perez has two reasons to celebrate today. First, it's his 50th birthday, and, second, he plans to join the crowd of passengers expected to ride the new Gold Line Eastside extension for free on its first day of service. "My friend already called me, 'Hey, let's check it out to go downtown,' " said Perez, an Eastside resident who works for a demolition company. Los Angeles County's latest light-rail line, the $898-million Gold Line Eastside extension opens to the public today after being formally dedicated Saturday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
What is the Gold Line Eastside extension? It's the latest light-rail line in Los Angeles County, running six miles from downtown L.A. through Boyle Heights and into East Los Angeles. When it opens to the public on Sunday, the Gold Line will run from Pasadena to East L.A. The Eastside extension cost $898 million to build. Construction began in 2004. -- How many stations are there? There are eight stations along the extension's route: Atlantic, East L.A. Civic Center, Maravilla, Indiana, Soto, Mariachi Plaza, Pico/Aliso and Little Tokyo/Arts District.
FOOD
November 11, 2009 | By Linda Burum, Miles Clements, Betty Hallock and Thi Nguyen
Call it the sushi- torta express. Set to start running on Sunday, the Gold Line Eastside Extension is a direct, six-mile shot from Little Tokyo to East Los Angeles. It's also a light-rail lifeline to the incredible variety of restaurants that surrounds each of the eight new stations: izakaya , bakeries, marketplaces, taquerías, burrito stands, sukiyaki joints, sandwich shops, roast goat specialists and seafood emporiums. Once the train pulls out of the Little Tokyo depot and leaves behind downtown's sushi bars and ramen- ya , it crosses the 1st Street bridge, dips underground for a couple of stops and comes up again after Soto Street, passing the burritos, cemitas and mariscos of Boyle Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drive down 3rd Street through East Los Angeles, and you can't help but notice Belvedere Park, with its tranquil lake and sloping grass field. Less eye-catching, however, is the row of county buildings on Fetterly Avenue just outside the southwestern edge of the park. Some buildings have no signs, and confused visitors often circle the block, unsure where to go or where they can park.
MAGAZINE
August 31, 2003 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
Despite the broken windows and graffiti, the old Golden Gate Theatre in East Los Angeles still maintains its majestic aura. An architectural landmark and social hub before it was vacated in the late 1980s, the 12,000-square-foot structure at the intersection of Atlantic and Whittier boulevards may be staging a comeback. Escrow closed recently on sale of the property to the Charles Co. of Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2012 | By Frank Shyong and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously adopted a resolution Tuesday that joined a chorus of voices opposing plans to extend the 710 Freeway north either above ground or by tunnel. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Thursday narrowed the 12 possible options down to five and decided to cease exploration of any above-ground extension. But a tunnel connecting the 710 Freeway to the 210 Freeway is still on the table. MTA officials have said they do not prefer a single option, but foes believe the tunnel is the favored option because it provides a route for trucks from the Port of Los Angeles to move cargo inland.
FOOD
November 11, 2009 | Linda Burum; Miles Clements; Betty Hallock; Thi Nguyen
Call it the sushi-torta torta express. Set to start running on Sunday, the Gold Line Eastside Extension is a direct, six-mile shot from Little Tokyo to East Los Angeles. It's also a light-rail lifeline to the incredible variety of restaurants that surrounds each of the eight new stations: izakaya , bakeries, marketplaces, taquerías, burrito stands, sukiyaki joints, sandwich shops, roast goat specialists and seafood emporiums. Once the train pulls out of the Little Tokyo depot and leaves behind downtown's sushi bars and ramen- ya , it crosses the 1st Street bridge, dips underground for a couple of stops and comes up again after Soto Street, passing the burritos, cemitas and mariscos of Boyle Heights.
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
It would be tough to overstate the level of cynicism that exists in certain corners of the Los Angeles establishment about the future of mass transit in Southern California. For many power brokers and longtime observers of the political scene, disparaging the chances of the region ever putting together a comprehensive transit system is some combination of rhetorical tic and parlor game.   In fact, the progress we've already made on a subway and light-rail network -- full of delays and misjudgments as it has been -- is remaking the physical and psychological terrain of Los Angeles in some profound ways.
FOOD
November 11, 2009 | By Linda Burum, Miles Clements, Betty Hallock and Thi Nguyen
Call it the sushi- torta express. Set to start running on Sunday, the Gold Line Eastside Extension is a direct, six-mile shot from Little Tokyo to East Los Angeles. It's also a light-rail lifeline to the incredible variety of restaurants that surrounds each of the eight new stations: izakaya , bakeries, marketplaces, taquerías, burrito stands, sukiyaki joints, sandwich shops, roast goat specialists and seafood emporiums. Once the train pulls out of the Little Tokyo depot and leaves behind downtown's sushi bars and ramen- ya , it crosses the 1st Street bridge, dips underground for a couple of stops and comes up again after Soto Street, passing the burritos, cemitas and mariscos of Boyle Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drive down 3rd Street through East Los Angeles, and you can't help but notice Belvedere Park, with its tranquil lake and sloping grass field. Less eye-catching, however, is the row of county buildings on Fetterly Avenue just outside the southwestern edge of the park. Some buildings have no signs, and confused visitors often circle the block, unsure where to go or where they can park.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The Watts Village Theater Company's signature for the past three years has been "Meet Me @Metro," a traveling show in which the small nonprofit company rode L.A.'s light rail system, with actors and audiences disembarking and reboarding for performances related to the history and issues of neighborhoods along the route. But after last summer's production along the Metro Gold Line from Union Station to the East L.A. Civic Center, artistic director Guillermo Aviles-Rodriguez's ambitions for "Meet Me @Metro" became a sore spot for the theater's board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | Christopher Hawthorne ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
It would be tough to overstate the level of cynicism that exists in certain corners of the Los Angeles establishment about the future of mass transit in Southern California. For many power brokers and longtime observers of the political scene, disparaging the chances of the region ever putting together a comprehensive transit system is some combination of rhetorical tic and parlor game. In fact, the progress we've already made on a subway and light-rail network -- full of delays and misjudgments as it has been -- is remaking the physical and psychological terrain of Los Angeles in some profound ways.
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