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East Mojave National Preserve

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NEWS
September 21, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a move that may effectively kill California's newest national park, Republicans in Congress have slashed funding for the East Mojave National Preserve and ordered that it be run as a scenic area with fewer limits on mining, grazing and other activities. Led by opponents of the preserve, a Senate-House conference committee voted late Tuesday to take away all funds for the National Park Service to operate Mojave. Control over the 1.
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NEWS
September 21, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a move that may effectively kill California's newest national park, Republicans in Congress have slashed funding for the East Mojave National Preserve and ordered that it be run as a scenic area with fewer limits on mining, grazing and other activities. Led by opponents of the preserve, a Senate-House conference committee voted late Tuesday to take away all funds for the National Park Service to operate Mojave. Control over the 1.
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NEWS
May 28, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
If preservationists thought the battle for the California desert ended last year when Congress approved creation of the 1.4-million acre East Mojave National Preserve, they were wrong. What Congress can give, Congress can take away. And with a new Republican majority in Washington, longtime opponents of the desert preserve are hoping to starve it of funds needed to operate. Already, they have had some success. At the behest of Rep.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
If preservationists thought the battle for the California desert ended last year when Congress approved creation of the 1.4-million acre East Mojave National Preserve, they were wrong. What Congress can give, Congress can take away. And with a new Republican majority in Washington, longtime opponents of the desert preserve are hoping to starve it of funds needed to operate. Already, they have had some success. At the behest of Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1995
In answer to "Clinton Should Reject Sabotage of Desert Act" (editorial, Sept. 22), expressing a one-sided view of Congress' wish to continue to have the Bureau of Land Management manage the proposed East Mojave National Park: The act that resulted in the East Mojave National Preserve was written behind closed doors by a small, elitist group and with little, if any, input from an informed public--and it passed by only one vote, from an urban Eastern...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995
President Clinton's veto of the Interior Department's appropriation bill drew considerably less notice than the titanic game of chicken being played over the omnibus budget package. But his action was important and his objections to the many invidious riders in the $12.1-billion bill were correct. Arguably the two worst of that bad batch were provisions allowing clear cutting in Alaska's Tongass National Forest and undermining funding for and use of California's new Mojave National Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995
President Clinton is in California today to raise money for his reelection. If he sees this state, the most populous, as crucial to his reelection--which it inarguably is--then he should veto the congressional mischief known as the interior appropriations bill. The bill, approved Tuesday by a Senate-House conference, has joined a herd of legislative Trojan horses stalking Washington. It is swollen with hidden attacks on the public lands, national parks and the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2002 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Antelope Valley Poppy Preserve closed a month early, with a funereal-looking black-bordered announcement on its Web site. With no poppies in bloom, the season was dead. The worst ever recorded 12-month dry spell across California's 25 million acres of desert, from Death Valley to the Mexican border, has set off an ecological chain reaction of hunger, thirst and deprivation for scores of plant and animal species.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER and FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A House Appropriations subcommittee voted 7 to 6 Tuesday to lift a 14-year-old moratorium on offshore oil drilling along the coast of California, sparking immediate opposition from President Clinton. In voting to drop the moratorium from this year's Interior Department spending bill, the subcommittee has begun a process that could eventually lead to new oil and gas exploration and development in federal waters off California.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | JANET HOOK and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concluding a Republican drive to enact high-priority legislation before beginning a two-week recess, the House on Friday approved and sent to the White House a bill limiting damage awards in product liability cases. But the GOP sense of accomplishment was dampened by the recognition that the product liability measure is unlikely to become law and by the inability of congressional negotiators to complete work on this year's federal budget.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of partisan wrangling, the House on Wednesday passed a sweeping land-protection bill, creating two national parks and dozens of wilderness areas in the ecologically fragile and archeologically rich California desert. The House voted 298 to 128 to approve the landmark legislation after Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez) took the extraordinary step of asking for a time limit on debate over several remaining Republican amendments.
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