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May 13, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley signed an authorization for federal money to be sent to Far East National Bank in 1984, nearly five years before he says he first was made aware that the bank did business with the city, according to a document revealed Friday at a Los Angeles City Council committee hearing into conflict-of-interest allegations against the mayor. Council members also were told that the mayor's office had been notified in writing as early as 1978 that the city had a business relationship with Far East National Bank.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
So Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley is not a crook. And I suppose the report by City Atty. James K. Hahn (Part I, Sept. 14) is not a whitewash. Hahn's "unprecedented investigation" of the mayor's finances (which Bradley claims he insisted upon) lasted six months, ended with a day's conversation with the mayor as the final witness in which Bradley told him he had done nothing wrong, and concluded that "by George, no crimes had been committed." If the $18,000 paid by Far East National Bank was not a bribe to get the $2 million in taxpayer funds, which were deposited under highly irregular circumstances after Bradley called the city treasurer about it, then why did Bradley give the money back?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989
"In retrospect, my decision to engage in outside employment was a mistake because of the perceptions it created. I now recognize that error and I will always regret it." --Mayor Tom Bradley, who faces four independent investigations into his financial relationships with the Far East National Bank and Valley Federal Savings & Loan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The waiters were dishing out melting parfaits and the audience was serving up soft questions Wednesday as Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley stood before 300 San Fernando Valley business leaders at a Sherman Oaks luncheon. Bradley easily fielded inquiries about potholes, police protection and after-school care for children. Then with a smile, he recognized the president of the Encino Chamber of Commerce for the last question of the day. Dessert spoons fell idle across the Valley Hilton dining room as Benjamin M. Reznik asked about the mayor's "errors of judgment" in serving as a paid director of a bank that does business with the city.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A review of Mayor Tom Bradley's stock transactions has been referred to the Securities and Exchange Commission for investigation, City Atty. James K. Hahn revealed today. The transactions include several profitable investments handled by Drexel Burnham Lambert and Michael Milken, who headed the firm's high-yield junk bond operations and has since been indicted on charges of racketeering, insider trading and securities fraud. Hahn made the disclosure after a hearing of the City Council's Government Operations Committee on allegations that Bradley violated conflict-of-interest restrictions by acting as an adviser to Far East National Bank and joining the board of Valley Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
The Urban Mass Transit Authority on Tuesday said that Mayor Tom Bradley's office had failed to follow procedures in a series of transactions of federal funds it funneled through Far East National Bank. The bank is at the heart of a conflict-of-interest investigation of Bradley by the city attorney. The transactions involved $1.4 million in grants from the transit agency to the city of Los Angeles in 1987. The funds were left in a non-interest-bearing account at Far East for several months, costing the city about $12,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
So Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley is not a crook. And I suppose the report by City Atty. James K. Hahn (Part I, Sept. 14) is not a whitewash. Hahn's "unprecedented investigation" of the mayor's finances (which Bradley claims he insisted upon) lasted six months, ended with a day's conversation with the mayor as the final witness in which Bradley told him he had done nothing wrong, and concluded that "by George, no crimes had been committed." If the $18,000 paid by Far East National Bank was not a bribe to get the $2 million in taxpayer funds, which were deposited under highly irregular circumstances after Bradley called the city treasurer about it, then why did Bradley give the money back?
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD and FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, contrary to past denials, apparently knew that the city was doing business with Far East National Bank while he was a paid member of the bank's board of advisers, according to documents made available to The Times. Moreover, some of the documents, as well as interviews with city officials, indicate that actions taken by Bradley's office prompted the city treasurer's office to work more closely with the bank. The documents, along with comments of bank President Henry Hwang, present a picture of a mayor using his influence to advance the interests of a private firm by interceding with city agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Tom Bradley met in his City Hall office with Far East National Bank Chairman Henry Hwang early last year while the mayor was serving as a paid adviser to the bank and Hwang was actively soliciting deposits from the city, newly obtained records show. The March 16, 1988, meeting came five days before the bank received a $1-million city deposit. The mayor has repeatedly insisted that he did not know, during the 12-month period he earned $18,000 as a foreign trade adviser to Far East National Bank, that the bank did business with the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY and FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley spent Saturday in the comfort of the neighborhood where his political career began, talking with children and knocking on old friends' doors. But he refused to answer questions about an investigation into city involvement with a bank that hired him as an adviser. "When the inquiry is over, we will have the facts we need," he told a reporter who interviewed him in the Crenshaw District, which he represented in the City Council from 1963 until he was elected mayor in 1973.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
The Urban Mass Transit Authority on Tuesday said that Mayor Tom Bradley's office had failed to follow procedures in a series of transactions of federal funds it funneled through Far East National Bank. The bank is at the heart of a conflict-of-interest investigation of Bradley by the city attorney. The transactions involved $1.4 million in grants from the transit agency to the city of Los Angeles in 1987. The funds were left in a non-interest-bearing account at Far East for several months, costing the city about $12,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Tom Bradley met in his City Hall office with Far East National Bank Chairman Henry Hwang early last year while the mayor was serving as a paid adviser to the bank and Hwang was actively soliciting deposits from the city, newly obtained records show. The March 16, 1988, meeting came five days before the bank received a $1-million city deposit. The mayor has repeatedly insisted that he did not know, during the 12-month period he earned $18,000 as a foreign trade adviser to Far East National Bank, that the bank did business with the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
The city attorney's investigation into Mayor Tom Bradley's financial holdings has widened to include a comprehensive look at all potential conflicts of interest involving the mayor, senior officials indicated Wednesday. The indication came when Councilman Michael Woo, in a meeting of the council's Governmental Operations Committee, asked Assistant City Atty. Charles Goldenberg whether the investigation he is directing will look at the relationship between city officials and the troubled investment firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
An independent authority set up by the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach has held a non-interest-bearing checking account with Far East National Bank since 1984, according to documents released Tuesday by the Los Angeles Harbor Department. The two ports deposited a total of $5 million in the account during 1984 and 1985 toward construction of a $62-million facility to transfer cargo containers from ships to rail cars. The 150-acre Wilmington facility, operated by Southern Pacific Transportation Co., opened in December, 1986.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Legal Affairs Writer
Legal experts say they do not expect prosecutors to charge Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley with any crimes based on allegations that he took official actions to benefit a bank and a savings and loan in which he had financial interests. They say that if the mayor faces legal difficulty stemming from his role as a paid official of the two financial institutions--and it is not clear that he does--it will most likely take the form of a civil suit alleging that he violated the less punitive of the state's two conflict-of-interest laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Publicly conceding that the controversy over Mayor Tom Bradley's financial dealings will not soon be silenced, Deputy Mayor Mike Gage said Friday that the Administration will soon unleash policy proposals that had been held up for weeks in the hope that the storm over the mayor's personal finances would pass. The first of the proposals--a plan to encourage developments that include both homes and businesses, thereby theoretically lessening traffic and smog concerns--will be unveiled Wednesday, Gage said in an interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writers
The City Council today will question City Treasurer Leonard Rittenberg about his controversial ad hoc policy of steering lucrative city business to select minority-owned banks--including one that had employed Mayor Tom Bradley as a paid adviser. The Governmental Operations Committee of the City Council, which is conducting an inquiry into the mayor's ties to two local financial institutions and a trade association, has asked Rittenberg to supply more information on his unusual investment policy that was put into writing as a policy statement only last Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY and FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Tom Bradley disclosed Wednesday that he has retained a top civil attorney and a politically influential law firm to "protect my interest" in the city attorney's investigation of his ties with two financial institutions. Meanwhile, the prospect arose that the City Council may hire special counsel to look into whether Bradley violated conflict-of-interest laws when he received payments for serving on the board of Valley Federal Savings and Loan Assn. and as a member of the Board of Advisors for Far East National Bank, firms that have had dealings with the city.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley signed an authorization for federal money to be sent to Far East National Bank in 1984, nearly five years before he says he first was made aware that the bank did business with the city, according to a document revealed Friday at a Los Angeles City Council committee hearing into conflict-of-interest allegations against the mayor. Council members also were told that the mayor's office had been notified in writing as early as 1978 that the city had a business relationship with Far East National Bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writers
The City Council today will question City Treasurer Leonard Rittenberg about his controversial ad hoc policy of steering lucrative city business to select minority-owned banks--including one that had employed Mayor Tom Bradley as a paid adviser. The Governmental Operations Committee of the City Council, which is conducting an inquiry into the mayor's ties to two local financial institutions and a trade association, has asked Rittenberg to supply more information on his unusual investment policy that was put into writing as a policy statement only last Friday.
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