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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1999
Re East Timor crisis: God bless Australia. JERRY BRADLEY Santa Barbara
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SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Around 35% of women experience violence at the hands of their partners or other sexual violence, the World Health Organization reported Thursday, in the first systematic study to examine global data on violence against women. Working with colleagues at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council, WHO researchers compiled population data from all over the world to report global and local prevalence estimates for sexual and intimate partner violence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999
Re "Don't Rule Out Use of U.S. Troops as an Option in Indonesia," by Tom Plate, Commentary, Aug. 18: The U.S. government helped the Indonesian government to kill about 200,000 people in East Timor. The U.S. government has less than zero moral credibility regarding human rights in East Timor. They call it internationalism, but it smells like old-fashioned imperialism. MIKE MADRID Lomita Had the U.S. and Australian governments tried to discourage Indonesia from invading and occupying East Timor 24 years ago, we would not need to be discussing the use of troops in East Timor now. However, the current situation does demand this discussion.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Expect the world to change overnight. Africa's battle-scarred South Sudan on Saturday is poised to become the newest country on Earth despite renewed attacks launched by Sudan last week as independence day approached.   In case you don't know where South Sudan is, the British newspaper the Guardian has created a brilliant downloadable, printable color map featuring the newest country, which is sandwiched between the Central African Republic and Ethiopia in northern Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999
It is increasingly clear to the Indonesian government and to outside observers that East Timor, the desperately poor half-island, will vote for independence in late August, if the U.N.-sponsored referendum takes place. Pro-Jakarta militias backed by the Indonesian military continue to terrorize the population, intending oting. The world should not stand aloof. The United States and, especially, Indonesia's regional partners, must pressure Jakarta into restraining its military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1999
Re "Indonesia Declares Martial Law in E. Timor," Sept. 7: The moral imperative for doing something to fight thuggery in East Timor is even clearer than it was in Kosovo, where civil war and ethnic hatreds have raged for years. We stood by years ago when Indonesia grabbed East Timor. After years of indifference to the continuing plight of East Timorese, the U.N. suddenly sponsors an election that creates a tragic mockery of the rights of the voters. It then fails to take further action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1999
The U.N. Security Council, racing the clock to relieve tormented inhabitants of East Timor, moved closer Monday to deploying an international security force, too late for many but not too late to safeguard the new country's hard-fought independence. Indonesian Foreign Minister Ali Abdullah Alatas, whose government equivocated while its army-backed militias rampaged through the newly independent territory, said Jakarta will impose no conditions on the U.N. force.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
About 400 Indonesian soldiers left East Timor in a partial withdrawal that the government hopes will set the stage for talks. Tens of thousands of people were killed during Indonesia's December 1975 invasion of East Timor. Indonesia annexed the territory the following year. Since then, rebels have frequently clashed with troops.
WORLD
November 29, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An Indonesian court acquitted a military official accused of involvement in a massacre during East Timor's bloody break from Indonesia in 1999. The court cleared Lt. Col. Endar Priyanto of all charges, making him the latest to be acquitted in a series of such trials. Priyanto was the army chief in East Timor's capital, Dili, when militiamen attacked the house of a prominent independence leader, killing 12 civilians. He was accused of failing to prevent the massacre.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia and Australia agreed to hold emergency talks after weekend violence in East Timor in which up to 30 people died. The nations announced the meeting between Australian Prime Minister John Howard and President B.J. Habibie as Indonesia finalized an autonomy package on which East Timorese are scheduled to vote in July.
WORLD
July 23, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration said Thursday that it would resume limited assistance to Indonesia's special forces, which have been barred from receiving U.S. military aid for more than a decade because of human rights abuses. The decision probably will face criticism from human rights groups and some members of Congress who contend that human rights violations by the special forces, including their role in a violent crackdown on separatists in East Timor in the late 1990s, have not been thoroughly investigated.
WORLD
July 23, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration said Thursday it would resume assistance to Indonesia's special forces, which had been barred from receiving U.S. military aid for more than a decade because of human-rights abuses. The decision was criticized by a human-rights group that contends rights violations by the special forces, including their role in a campaign of violence against separatists in East Timor during the late 1990s, have never been thoroughly investigated. The announcement came after months of negotiations with the Indonesian government, which agreed to remove several special-forces soldiers convicted of human-rights violations and committed to suspend members of the unit who were accused of abuses in the future, according to senior U.S. Defense officials.
WORLD
December 7, 2009 | By Karima Anjani
The government here has banned a controversial Australian-made film that depicts the Indonesian military's reported 1975 execution of six foreign journalists in East Timor. Indonesia's film censorship board announced last week that all screenings of the political thriller "Balibo," which documents the killings of the so-called Balibo Five, are forbidden. The five -- two Australians, two Britons and a New Zealander -- were working for Australian television networks when they were allegedly murdered by Indonesian troops during the 1975 invasion of East Timor.
NEWS
September 13, 2009 | Anthony Deutsch
A decade after tiny East Timor broke from Indonesia and prompted one of the most expensive U.N.-led nation-building projects in history, there is little to show for the billions of dollars spent. The world has given more than $8.8 billion in assistance to East Timor since the vote for independence in 1999, according to figures compiled by the Associated Press from the United Nations and 46 donor countries and agencies. That works out to $8,000 for each of East Timor's 1.1 million people, one of the highest per-person rates of international aid. But little of the money, perhaps no more than a dollar of every 10, appears to have made it into East Timor's economy.
WORLD
July 16, 2008 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
The president of Indonesia on Tuesday formally accepted a commission report that blames his country's security forces for supporting militias in a frenzy of murder, rape and other crimes against humanity in East Timor nine years ago. "We convey very deep remorse at what happened in the past that has caused the loss of lives and property," President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said as he and East Timorese President Jose Ramos-Horta jointly received the commission's findings.
WORLD
March 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A former policeman suspected of wounding East Timor's president last month has surrendered to police, military officials said. Amaro da Costa turned himself in late Saturday, handing over two automatic weapons and some ammunition, Lt. Col. Filomeno Paixao said. President Jose Ramos- Horta is still recovering from the Feb. 11 shooting outside his home. Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao escaped unharmed from an ambush on his motorcade the same day. Da Costa told reporters that the suspect "was involved" but provided few other details.
WORLD
February 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
East Timor prosecutors said today that they had issued arrest warrants for 12 suspects in attacks on the country's top two leaders. Atty. Gen. Longuinhos Monteiro told reporters in the capital, Dili, that five more warrants were likely. The names of the suspects were not released. Nobel Peace Prize-winning President Jose Ramos-Horta was critically wounded by gunmen Monday outside his home. His guards killed a wanted militant leader during the attack.
WORLD
February 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Armored U.N. vehicles were guarding East Timor's leaders today and a beefed-up contingent of Australian troops patrolled streets and searched cars in the wake of rebel attacks Monday on the president and prime minister. The army chief has blamed the United Nations, which oversees a 1,400-member international police force, for failing to protect the country's top leaders and demanded an outside investigation. But the U.N.
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