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East Timor Government

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WORLD
May 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Armed gangs left a path of devastation across East Timor's capital Saturday, sending thousands of people fleeing and deepening a crisis that foreign intervention troops have so far been unable to quell. The violence is raising concerns that the world's youngest nation is plunging into a civil war, seven years after its traumatic break from 24 years of repressive occupation by the regional giant, Indonesia.
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WORLD
May 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Armed gangs left a path of devastation across East Timor's capital Saturday, sending thousands of people fleeing and deepening a crisis that foreign intervention troops have so far been unable to quell. The violence is raising concerns that the world's youngest nation is plunging into a civil war, seven years after its traumatic break from 24 years of repressive occupation by the regional giant, Indonesia.
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NEWS
February 11, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Indonesian soldiers parachuted into East Timor in 1975, in an invasion carried out with tacit U.S. approval, Marxist guerrillas in the island territory were there to greet them with a withering barrage of bullets. Many of the paratroopers died before hitting the ground. That was the beginning of a 24-year association that has never gotten much friendlier. It turned the former Portuguese colony into what Indonesian presidential candidate Amien Rais has called "a thorn in our flesh."
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Indonesian soldiers parachuted into East Timor in 1975, in an invasion carried out with tacit U.S. approval, Marxist guerrillas in the island territory were there to greet them with a withering barrage of bullets. Many of the paratroopers died before hitting the ground. That was the beginning of a 24-year association that has never gotten much friendlier. It turned the former Portuguese colony into what Indonesian presidential candidate Amien Rais has called "a thorn in our flesh."
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | Associated Press
Indonesia is willing to grant independence to East Timor, the government said Wednesday for the first time since annexing the island territory 23 years ago. Although East Timor activists greeted the news cautiously, the statement seemed to be a major reversal of Indonesia's stance on the former Portuguese territory, where it has faced international pressure to end years of fighting with rebels.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 |
A crowd of onlookers Friday jeered and chased a bus carrying the first pro-Indonesian militia leader to return to East Timor since violence shattered the territory six months ago. Jaunico Belo, who commanded militias in eastern East Timor, toured parts of the territory's capital, Dili, while under heavy military escort. "We brought him here from West Timor so he could see what's going on," U.N. spokeswoman Barbara Reis said.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indonesia, in one of the most repressive steps toward its press in years, has closed its three leading newsmagazines after the government said they overstepped official restrictions on the news media. The Information Department, which must license all publications in the sprawling island nation, announced that it has revoked the permit for Tempo, the country's biggest news weekly; DeTik, a rapidly expanding tabloid, and Editor, another newsmagazine.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remote territory of East Timor has been a thorn in the Indonesian government's side for years. Now a Clinton Administration decision to adopt a tougher stance on human rights violations there is being seen as a possible precursor to a fundamental change in U.S. human rights policy in Asia. The departure came late last month in a little-noticed action when the United States joined in supporting a resolution of the U.N.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The angry militia members carried the headless corpse of their leader through the town of Atambua, looking for revenge. After a year of living in squalid refugee camps in the province of West Timor and surviving on handouts from the United Nations, they knew right where to go: the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. A mob of 6,000 gathered outside and screamed for the death of foreigners--any foreigners, one witness said.
WORLD
May 18, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Domingues da Costa tells it, the only bad thing he did was dump a body down a well. He swears that he didn't kill anybody or steal anything. A member of the feared Aitarak militia that destroyed much of this capital in 1999, he returned home last week to face his neighbors for the first time in nearly three years. He hopes that they will forgive him for opposing independence for East Timor. "I wanted to come back because this is my homeland," he said. "I'm ready to confess.
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