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Easter Island

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood has well-known ways of teasing reality into movie magic, winking at factual accuracy. In a new film about Easter Island, that imaginative tradition meshes with a pattern of myth and fantasy already overshadowing the blurry past of this remote Pacific outpost. Some archeologists, trying to piece together an accurate picture of the island's cultural heritage, are unhappy over what Hollywood has done.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | DEEPTI HAJELA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was, once upon a time, one of the most isolated places in the world--Rapa Nui, or Easter Island. More than 2,400 miles from Tahiti or Chile, the South American country to which it belongs, the triangle-shaped island in the South Pacific became home centuries ago to people who populated it with giant stone statues representing their gods and ancient chieftains.
TRAVEL
October 24, 1999 | BILL PAPICH, Bill Papich is a freelance writer living in New Mexico
The window-seat passengers pointed frantically. After 2,200 miles and 5 1/2 hours above the Pacific, they had spotted land: cliffs rising to meet gentle hills peppered with volcanic rock. "Look, moai!" someone blurted. We all strained against our seat belts to see one of the super-size stone statues that make Rapa Nui, as the islanders call their home, an enigma. Why were hundreds of these monuments carved more than half a millennium ago? And who tried to destroy them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Indiana Jones, the swashbuckling fictional adventurer, would seem to have nothing on John Goddard. As a boy growing up in Los Angeles, Goddard dreamed of adventures in faraway lands and spent his life pursuing an elaborate set of goals. He wanted to climb the world's most perilous peaks, navigate its major rivers and explore its most remote regions, among many other ambitions. Goddard, an adventurer, explorer and lecturer who evidently fell only a few goals short of a boyhood list that numbered more than 100, died Friday at a Glendale hospital of complications from cancer, said his son Jeffery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Whatever happened to magic realism? The question arises when dipping into "Maya's Notebook," Isabel Allende's bruising, cinematically vivid new novel. It's an exercise in gritty realism rather than the fanciful folkloricism that Allende has been known for, accurately or not, since her fictional debut, "The House of the Spirits," 30 years ago. Magic realism always was more of a publishers' marketing coinage than an apt description of the works of the so-called Latin American Boom, which looms over Spanish-language literature like Easter Island monoliths: Mario Vargas Llosa, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Henry Rollins travels with a fierce agenda. He believes if you aren't moved, disturbed or changed by where you go, you're not going to the right places. "Traveling allows the opportunity for humility to creep into your life," says Rollins, a photographer, actor, author, publisher, TV and radio personality, and punk-rock veteran. You can meet the former Black Flag frontman and hear about his travel insights at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the L.A. Times Travel Show at the L.A. Convention Center.
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